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3

Okay, so, while I might quibble with your example (I see some pretty bright images in there), I think there is a backlash against highly-saturated, "ultra-color" images. This is exemplified by a comment your question (which I'm quoting in case it's later deleted): Thank goodness the trend to make everything look like technicolor rainbows of clown vomit ...


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If things are remotely close on Snapsort, then Snapsort is generally agreed to be a poor judge of which is best. It can reliably tell you that a D800 is better than a T5i since it is a huge difference, but Snapsort overall scores and the noise and IQ ratings rarely relate that closely to real life experience. What is a little more telling though is looking ...


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You can look at DxO Labs description of their testing protocol. Be sure to click on next at the bottom of each page to read the entire document. As the above link indicates, for testing to be meaningful it must take place in strictly controlled and reproducible conditions. This includes seemingly insignificant things such as temperature and humidity, as ...


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Let's not forget the reviews on lensrentals.com. While it's not a dedicated review site, it may as well be. There's lots of great information in there from people who've been using the lenses for years.


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Now we know that Tamron may have autofocus issues right out of the box, and may require tweaking via the tap-in console... The-Digital-Picture does their lens tests using careful manual focus, so AF performance does not affect the image quality samples at TDP. How much coffee Bryan has had before testing a lens might! The real users on the Internet, on ...


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NO Snapsort just pulls various numbers from other sites and weights them in a way that has nothing to do with what matters most or least to most photographers. For example, their sensor rating scores are taken from DxO Mark without any sense of context or any recognition of the way different manufacturers scores are affected at DxO Mark by such things as ...


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The camera used to test a lens affects image quality. The exact same lens can be moved from one body to another with very different results. The Digital Picture prefers to use Canon bodies, but Tamron makes lenses for multiple camera mounts. Reviews from multiple sources, using different bodies and copies of the lens, are likely to report different results. ...


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They may have had a bad copy of the lens. Consider, for example, the Canon EF 35mm f/2 non-IS non-USM lens. TheDigitalPicture says this. Whereas, DxOMark says this (see field map at f/2.8). According to TDP, the 35mm lens is crap in the corners even at f/2.8. According to DxOMark, it's quite a good lens assuming you stop down to f/2.8. Obligatory links: ...


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There are lots of possible explanations for the possible trend that you've noticed, including: math: It may be that you're just looking for a set of images that are in the minority compared to the full set of photos on these sites. For example, you asked about warm, saturated colors. If photos tend to be uniformly distributed across the color temperature ...


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For me it looks like rolling shutter effect. For more detailed explanation what is this you can check here


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