10

I'm not quite sure why you're so skeptical; it's well-explained and the explanation seems plausible. To respond to your particular points, having read the page: The setup with the stool and glass is used for the photos where the snowflakes are on the glass and backlit. They are on the glass, 2.5-3cm away from the lens. The rings on the front of the lens (...


9

Lens weight when reverse mounting is rarely an issue. The technique gives the best result with normal or slightly wide angle prime lens. These are not heavy. Mounting a telephoto lens in fact gives you an inferior result (low magnification). Mounting a zoom in reverse is bad optics. You can not control the aperture from camera; it is therefore easier to use ...


8

It's a fact that using two lenses with one reversed works. Here are a few quick examples that I shot by combining two lenses: 50mm with 50mm reversed: 50mm with 28mm reversed: 105mm with 28mm reversed: These were quick, dirty, and hand held -- I held the camera with one hand and held the reversed lens against the camera lens, focusing simply by moving ...


7

Yes, it can; pretty much any lens can, given a wide enough focal length. A 50mm lens will give you a 1:1 reproduction ratio (the magic 'macro' ratio), which means the image on the sensor will be life size. The wider the lens, the bigger the ratio, so a 35mm lens will give you a good macro shot (at least in terms of magnification). An 18-55mm kit lens will ...


6

We have a great blog post here at our own photography stack exchange blog that explains the process very thoroughly: Take macro shots like this for less than the cost of a pizza To answer your question, yes you can still manual focus, that is the only option as autofocus will not work when reverse mounted. Manual focus is a bit odd feeling, because the ...


6

If the image in the viewfinder was dark, I would say you are probably not opening the aperture. However, as you mention it is cloudy grey, I think it is more likely that you are simply not getting close enough to your subject. You need to get within a couple of centimetres of your subject to form an image when using a reversed lens. As Unapiedra said in the ...


5

You attach both lenses by their filter threads. So you need to find a reverse rings where one filter thread is for tele and another is for prime lens filter thread (so in your case 62 -> 52mm). Just be careful not to buy one with bayonet on one side and filter thread on another, as that's quite different type on mounting than what you need. And be careful ...


5

Basic cameras use "exposure simulation" in Liveview to help the shooter visualize what the final exposure will be. This creates problems when using manual lenses or any lens that does not communicate with the camera. More advanced cameras have the option to turn off "exposure simulation" but basic cameras like the 750D or SL1 do not have this option and ...


4

Well, the most extreme macro lens in production is, as far as I know, the Canon MP-E 65mm. It offers up to 5x magnification and is not an easy beast to master. At 5x magnification, it would still have to be a pretty darn big fly if its face were to fill a 24x36mm full-frame sensor, or even the 16x24-ish one on a crop camera. In other words - kit that ...


4

On the front of the camera, bottom right of the lens mount (as you look at the front), small round button.


4

Your best option is to get an old, manual focus lens. While new lenses are available, they are likely to cost more with little benefit for your purpose (experimentation with lens reversal). The mount doesn't matter because you will be using it with a reversal ring. If you want a lens you can use normally on your camera with an adapter, look for PK, OM, M42, ...


3

For Nikon F-mount lenses with mechanical aperture control, you can use the Nikon BR-6 Auto Diaphragm Ring. For Canon EF lenses, which have electronic only camera/lens communication, you can use an "Automatic" Macro reverse mount adapter. There are also other "DIY" ways to set the aperture to a desired setting. For Nikon F-mount lenses they usually involve ...


3

There is nothing wrong with the camera. Since lens is not attached, camera doesn't detect it and you can not shoot. solution : buy a reverse ring (Rs.200 cheaper one) for 18-55mm for your mount.


3

Can the MP-E 65 achieve a greater depth of field at the same magnification than a stopped down reversed lens? Probably not much in the center of the frame. Where the big advantage of the purpose built macro lens would be noticeable at the same magnification compared to some reversed lenses would be out near the edges and corners of the frame. Any minor ...


3

You can use any lens from any manufacturer. I use a 40 year old PK-mount Rikonon 50mm 1.7 lens on my Nikon (manual aperture rings are a great help when reversing). The wider the angle the bigger the magnification. Lens filter threads do vary in size, so make sure the ring you buy fits the lens you plan to use. Check out the Photo SE blog post on reversing ...


3

Actually instead of holding the apeture lever or using an aftermarket adapter you can use your DOF preview button or live view when the lens is connected properly. Then without shutting the camera off, pop the lens off and your apeture should stay where you had it set while it was connected properly. Much easier and I have used this trick with a d3100, d5100,...


3

Photograph a normal ruler, mm scale preferred. Then if your sensor is 24 mm wide (camera specs should say), and if the image shows say 20mm of that ruler, then the magnification is 24/20 or 1.2x (larger than 1:1 life size). Normally lenses show smaller than life size, like showing 40 mm on a 24mm sensor would be 24/40 = 0.6x magnification.


2

You may be underexposed in Manual mode and that's why exposure simulation is showing you a black screen. Try using Av mode, and seeing if exposure simulation now works to show you an image.


2

In addition to Esa Paulasto's suggestion, you can use a combination of telephoto and reversed wide-angle lens to do macro. I found that a 28mm reversed and added to a 200mm lens gave me 5.2x magnification (I photographed a ruler with this arrangement and computed the magnification). But as Staale S says, you will need bright lighting since you need to stop ...


2

Get a set of cheap screw Nikon G extension tubes from eBay. The part with the lens mount can be unscrewed from the rest of the tubes and mounted to the lens. This allows you to easily control the aperture, plus should provide a male filter thread that you can screw filters onto. (The set I purchased has a rather unusual 57 mm thread, and while it looks like ...


2

When looking for reverse mounting a lens, I have had the same issue, where I wanted to try macro but did not want to leave the lens open to dust or damage. The option I came up with was to modify a rear lens cap. What I did was to use a 50mm hole cutter to take out the center of the rear lens cap. I then trimmed down the remain wall to open out the hole ...


2

There is no electronic connection between the lens and the body. Except if you have bought the macro adapter. If you want to control the aperture, you have two options: Buy an adapter that provides the communication between the body and the lens. Use an old (any brand) lens with a manual aperture setting. The old auto aperture used a mechanical contact (...


2

The aperture operates in a plane perpendicular to the optical axis of the lens, so reversing the lens doesn't affect the way the aperture operates. Opening the aperture still lets in more light. Closing the aperture still lets in less light. Light passing through the center is still allowed to pass and light falling outside the opening is not allowed to pass....


2

Make sure you are working on Manual mode. That should work. Most DSLR cameras will not work on any mode but that one without an electronic lens attached. Another trick is to use another lens over your kit lens. You will get more magnification. :o) Use the longer focal length, not the wider one.


1

You may use extensión rings or auto bellows to obtain greater magnífication, with normal or reversed lens.


1

The problem is, once the normal lens is detached, the lens no longer able to exchanges electronic and mechanical instructions with the camera body. You can work this way, but now the burden to make lens adjustments, such as aperture settings, falls on your shoulders. The good news is, you can purchase advanced tubes and spacer rings that will maintain ...


1

I have never trusted a reverse mount for macro photography. Partly because of your noted concerns regarding the stress on the screw-thread [& possibly worse on the zoom, should you try to use one], but also because you're pretty much turning it into a manual lens. Also consider price-point. One Lens reverser - one per lens thread size, or a bunch of ...


1

I would hazard a guess and say probably the same way it does normally. As the AF is in body, and the adapter provides communication between camera and the lens it keeps sending signals to the lens till it gets a focus lock


1

NO. Manual focus will NOT be available with a Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 that is reverse mounted to the camera body. Reverse mounting attaches the filter threads, and all the glass elements of the lens, directly to the camera body. When you turn the focus ring the body of the lens will move back and forth but it will not move the glass elements. The only way to ...


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