124

I can see three very clear aspects that all three photos share, so let's concentrate on those. Two can be done in camera, the third is a software process. I didn't have time to costume a collection of actors or find a nice medieval-style location... but I have a toy bear & my living room, with a bookcase in the corner. I didn't set up any lighting for ...


56

There are two ways to go about accomplishing this - in camera and in post. Both techniques will rely on shooting a rim-lit subject. Put a flash behind the subject. In my image, I actually had the flash cranked up WAY too much, so I'm getting additional light acting as fill (bouncing off the couch and back toward the front of the subject): Set-up below ...


41

Directly with regards to the lighting: Much of her recent work has strong light sources from behind the main subject(s). About 45° (either to the side or a combination of to the side and above) from directly behind the subject seems to be the most common angle in her examples on instagram. She's not afraid to let the highlights go to get the shot she wants. ...


26

Increase the contrast - globally and additional local contrast in the trees and other areas (when you say amazing sharpness I think it's a big boost in contrast that you're noticing) Increase saturation Warm the image - you can see the greens have gone yellow Vignette In addtion, looks like they've applied some "glow" to the image. You can do this by ...


20

So, here's what I got in just a few minutes using two basic tools: Curves, and Unsharp mask: I used Gimp, but this is basic stuff any decent image editing software will have. Here's all I did. First, I used the curves tool to dramatically increase the black point, increasing shadow contrast: Then, I pulled the curve upwards to brighten the (new) midtones: ...


20

Background bokeh straight out of camera The above picture isn't necessarily a composite. You can achieve a similar effect straight out of camera. Here's a picture I took almost 10 years ago: And here's the setup: SB600+gridspot, back camera right, 1/16, 85mm SB25+Plusgreen gel, camera left, 1/64, 24mm. One chair as a big gobo to prevent light from ...


20

There are two main elements I see in your example images: Contrast These images have relatively low contrast. The brightest whites are nowhere near pure white. They're light grey. The darkest blacks are nowhere near pure black. They're dark grey. You can do this by reducing overall contrast, by lightening up the shadows (also known as reducing the blacks, ...


17

Lighting Luckily you don't need to drag round a full set of Profotos and car batteries to get this look, natural light is all you need. Shoot late in the day when the sun is low in the sky. This gives you a softer light, with natural fill, warmer colours and makes it easier to blow out (overexpose) the background and/or provide lots of highlights for great ...


15

The effect is due to combining flash and ambient light on a moving subject. The flash illuminates the subject which then moves. The subject blocks the ambient light creating a silhouette, and then moves before the flash fires so that the image lit by the flash is offset with the silhouette, giving the hard cartoon outline effect. No photoshop required for ...


15

You don't actually need a tilt-shift lens to do this. This particular image was taken with a standard lens (50mm f1.2 according to the filename of the image on Ryan's website) rather than with a tilt-shift. The extreme bokeh effect here was achieved by using a freelensing technique, where the lens is detached from the camera body and held at a tilted angle ...


14

In your question I recognise two parts: 1. How to combine the day/night parts. Take one photo of the daytime situation, take one photo of the evening situation. Use a tripod for the photos and let it stay there between the shots so the composition stays the same. Another possibility is to tether your camera to a laptop and use the daytime image as an ...


14

Shoot with a small aperture, f22 or like. It is called diffraction. There is a detailed answer Here And here are some sample photos taken with Sony Alpha A35 and an old Carl Zeiss Sonnar 135mm f/3.5 lens. I choose this lens to experiment because it has six blades and has a nice octagonal aperture at f/22. And also being a lens from cold war era, it is much ...


14

Low contrast (just look at the areas of deep shadow-- grey instead of black), possible desaturation, plus possibly a slight touch of simulated cross-processing, I'd say. Note also that in the region of the head, the contrast is stronger, indicating that a mask was applied at some point. This tutorial on a washed-out look may be interesting to you-- I ...


14

I'm not seeing this as particularly pastel. What I do see is a very common and popular look we get asked about a lot, often does described as a "old film effect". (See also this and this.) The black point this slightly raised. The deepest blacks are shown as medium/dark gray. A color cast is applied. In this case, yellowish. And that's really all there ...


14

The key is to find areas of the image with a lot of parallax, such as a foreground building and a background tree. Try to pick a point as close to one edge of frame as possible. Now walk left/right (green) to find the correct point of intersection from the old photograph. Now that you've done that, you've established a straight line to move along (red). ...


14

The setup is relatively simple but to do this as one shot you will need space. An awful lot of space. Doing this indoors in a regular sized house is not going to work, the walls/ceiling are going to reflect light back filling in the shadows and you wont get the fading-into-black effect. The easiest way to shoot this (short of renting a studio) would be to ...


13

I'm the photographer, who made the picture, and I used Photoshop to make the strings invisible holding the lenses. This is not a composite. The picture was made from 1 shot. The CE logo on the lens confuses people, because it looks like it's upside down, but actually it's reflected from a mirror.


13

I recognize this exact picture - I've seen it before. There are two photography magazines that I read that showed how to do this exact type of family portrait. This was done in a home with a simple black background. One article uses a softbox slightly off to the side and behind the subject. The other article uses a speedlight with a simple grid straight on (...


12

This technique is called Selective color. Sometimes, you select a point (in this case, somewhere on the CD-R case), and the region around that point that is close enough to the same color retains its color, while the rest of the picture becomes black and white. Other times, as you mention, you can select a color and a tolerance, or a range of colors, and ...


12

Look at the shadows under the cars. Now look at the shadow under the model... Oh wait! This looks to be more about how it was lit and exposed when shot than how it was post-processed. This photo is not really as much about the lens, the camera, or the post-processing. It is more about the off camera lighting illuminating the model and what that allows with ...


12

I think it combines two techniques: strong backlight (also known as contre-jour) fill-flash to add light to the details of subjects It can be created using lighting setups (absolutely artificial lighting), or using natural light as well (like sunset).


11

This is achieved by what is known as panning. To explain it simply, you basically follow your subject with your camera (in a panning motion.) It takes quite a bit of practice to get it right, but patience and practice will pay off with great looking shots. More information on capturing moving subjects can be found HERE.


11

Is there something important to say about the light in the portraits of Charles? There is. There is no mastering of light here. It's always diffused natural light, either from an overcast sky or very large windows, with very little shadows. No risk taken, just the very basics and lots of color retouch in post. The catchlights in the eyes here and here show ...


10

It looks like the photographer has changed the aperture during the exposure, using a manual lens. The lens starts wide open when the firework first explodes and is then quickly stopped down. I guess it just takes a lot of practice snapping with one hand and twisting the aperture ring with the other. A lens that offers a continually variable aperture (like ...


10

The look you are after is dependant on lighting and post processing rather than lenses. You want to shoot with soft but directional lighting so create strong textures within your image, directly sunlight through hazy cloud is good for this. As is the "magic hour". In post you need to blend the colour channels looking for the most contrasty mix. Then its a ...


10

I'm not quite sure why you're so skeptical; it's well-explained and the explanation seems plausible. To respond to your particular points, having read the page: The setup with the stool and glass is used for the photos where the snowflakes are on the glass and backlit. They are on the glass, 2.5-3cm away from the lens. The rings on the front of the lens (...


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