23

Usually, people are aware that they have it, but don't want it to be so pronounced. If you can use Gimp, there is a plugin called Wavelet decompose. In this site there is some information on how to use it to retouch pictures. I like that technique because you don't need to complete remove what doesn't please you, but you can minimize it so the picture ...


9

What kind of retouching are you doing ? only using the different buttons/sliders in Photoshop (or equivalent) or are you "drawing" stuff like masks, making hand-drawn selection, or actual painting ? A tablet is a tool that you need to learn to use; and learning is not something that is instantaneous; take your time. A tablet is a great tool when someone is ...


8

I have used retouchers in China like these guys that charge $5/picture (and less for large quantities) and aren't bad for basic retouching. For more skilled retouchers $10/picture is common. For pros that are more on the "graphic artist" level the rates I see run $50-$100/hour.


7

You can darken the pupils in a separate layer and tweak the transparency. You'd want to tweak a bit more on the edges of your drawn part to make it less fake. If you have a photo with the natural color, colorpick that and draw with that color instead of black. This tutorial just uses black, but shows the general procedure: http://graphicssoft.about.com/od/...


7

One technique often used to deal with those "shiny spots" as well as many other skin blemishes is called frequency separation. From The Ultimate Guide To The Frequency Separation Technique: Frequency Separation technique is virtually a process of decomposing of the image data into spatial frequencies, so that we can edit image details in the different ...


7

A photographer’s skill to retouch film and spot a print was a make or break proposition. Photographers had lots of tricks up their sleeves and successful ones used all of them. The portrait photographer made heavy use of these skills. They retouched negatives to remove blemishes and soften wrinkles and the like. Likely a retouch artist was on the payroll or ...


6

The solution was pretty straightforward. Covering the stain would work, but just using curves and applying them with a history brush in two modes, soft light and saturation removed the offending stains.


5

it's not a necessary step at all but it is popular especially on pictures of women and especially for lifestyle and fashion shots as it covers up wrinkles and bad skin. you're right though - it can be overdone to an extent that the skin looks flat. i think in portraiture a little glow is good though as it does glamourise the shot.


5

It's not particularly easy to remove entirely because where there are sweat stains there are also generally a lot of texture. I would probably try masking the area (making a layer that covers the area of the stain) and then use that mask to brighten the image up and make the stain less noticeable. I'd 'also probably feather the edges a bit to help blend it ...


5

Try holding down the spacebar while the tool is selected


4

What you need is the High Frequency Separation technique. Then you will be able to edit the sweat spot on the low resolution image very easily, basically a color replacement, and keep the textures of the T-shirt. You just have to select the proper filter frequency (or pixel blur, in other words, in the described technique). Do not forget to increase the ...


4

It is not required to take your professional further. What will take your career farther is a happy client. A good deal of blemish/wrinkles etc. can be taking care of by lighting direction and quality. However, pride is a big part of photography and if your subject wants wrinkles to disappear, then away they go. I try to take care of this in a client ...


4

The number one thing you can do is to get the flash off the camera. I use remote flashes when I can and a Custom Bracket at other times. The reflection in the dogs eyes is the same phenomenon as red-eye in people, it is light reflecting off of the back of their eye and into your camera, by moving the flash or other light source off axes of the camera the ...


4

As a professional photographer it takes me about 20-30 minutes per photo AT LEAST whether I'm editing a photos of inanimate objects or humans. It can take much longer if you're actually altering the information in the image. I've been asked to remove cords, change house numbers, edit out telephone lines, etc. That 30 min when editing a portrait includes ...


4

The problem with this image isn't general overexposure. It's that a cheap on-camera flash was used, pointed directly at the subject. The camera's auto-exposure program did a fine job of exposing most of the scene — the bookshelf and fireplace look fine! — but, of course, your main subject got too much light and is washed out. There's actually a reasonable ...


3

I've done a lot of sky replacements. I've used Topaz Remask, and all of Photoshop's built in tools, and it's never simple. There is always some manual touch ups necessary. This is what works for me: Initial Selection Color select usually does a good job if the sky is uniform in color. But any quick masking technique is never going to be perfect. ...


3

If both image have exactly the same size, this is pretty easy. Using an image editing program supporting layers (Paint.Net, Gimp, Photoshop), you can load each image on a different layer, one on top of the other. Then, carefully select the area you want to remove from the top image (make sure you are working on its layer) and remove the selected area. The ...


3

Two words... Pressure Sensitivity. A digitizer tablet allows you to control parameters of brushes based on how hard you press down. This is a huge advantage that a mouse can't replicate in terms of control over your work. Note that this also takes some configuration to figure out how best to maximize and may involve having to refine your touch up ...


3

If the background is sky, or is lighter than the wires, then stack your multiple images, align them and then for each wire you want to remove: with the image with the wire below and image without the wire above set layer blend mode to "lighten" that will show the top layer's lighter pixels in place of the wire mask as necessary It may be tricky to align ...


3

For removing spots there were fine brushes with paints designed to match the tones in black and white prints (I still have a set, 'cause I'm a geezer). For smoothing skin you could use airbrushing. For manipulating contrast in specific areas you could use masks (physical masks, cut out of thick paper) during the print exposure, so some areas got more light ...


3

Copyright has "nothing" to do with the watermark. At least not in this case. You do not have the right to commercialize the images for example. In this case, the watermark can simply be marked as "Preview" only. But the thing that is going to protect you more effectively is a contract.


3

All such rules vary by venue, I am not a lawyer, and this is not legal advice but I offer a slightly different answer to the also correct one by @Rafael: You are asking about your "rights". You have no rights beyond the contract you have with the photographer. Whether that contract is written or oral, vague or specific, that is the limit and the extent of ...


2

Find a stock image of a red lady over the white background and use parts of her hair to patch the image you are trying to fix. You will need to grade color a little bit and it will take like 10-15 minutes of work, but certainly doable.


2

I would not even try, you can fix it but it will take a lot of time. Even for me with a lot of Photoshop experience. You would have you rebuild the hair, and delete a lot of it. Request a better photo, or even just the original one - this one seems to have been tutored in Photoshop.


2

For a beginner, I think the Scott Kelby books are probably easiest to understand, and if you don't mind his corny sense of humour, they are well written and organised. The Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 Book for Digital Photographers The Adobe Photoshop CS6 Book for Digital Photographers Since you specifically mentioned portraits, his Professional Portrait ...


2

Don't forget that a lot of models are shooting TFP - time for prints. On their end they need shots that compete with all of the other models in portfolios, who have had such smoothing applied... Like you, I think most softening is overdone. I like to apply a light amount of softening so generally smooth out small imperfections while leaving overall ...


2

It's certainly the fastest way to hide blemishes and make skin look smoother, but overdone it does make it look flat. Personally, I'm not a big fan of the look, but I think expediency might be part of it. It is a lot more difficult to go in and fix blemishes by hand while maintaining the detail level without making it obvious that manipulations were made. ...


2

They were probably using the local adjustment tool with the clarity set to a negative value.


2

Personally, I generally use a very soft clone brush from right next to where the line is. If you feather it in properly and mix where you are pulling from between the two sides of a vein, you can usually clean them away with out the alterations being noticeable.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible