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49

I would like to add my technique! Scan the photo once as usual. Rotate the photo 180% on the scanner and scan again. In Photoshop, un-rotate the second scan. Import it as a layer on top of the first scan. Auto-Align Layers using Photoshop command. Assign second scan 50% opacity to blend images together. This technique comes from observing that the ...


36

The textbook method is, as others mentioned, to suppress the texture in frequency space. I will explain how to find the correct filter, that you can basically do manually in ImageJ (freeware java app). When you open the program it is a strip of menu. The parts you need are: File Open Selection rectangle Edit Crop Process-> FFT -> FFT Process-> FFT -> ...


22

Since the noise is periodic, your best option is to Fourier-transform the image and filter out the specific spatial frequencies of the noise. This way you will preserve a lot more detail than with any gaussian-based filtering. I don't know whether Photoshop can do that, but here is an example using ImageMagick.


17

A modern scanner of typical resolution should be able to do a reasonably good job on old photos if well used. Method of use can make a difference. See references at end for some tips and guidance. A 6" x 4" print at 300 dpi corresponds to 1800 x 1200 pixels ~=.... 2.5 megapixels A 6" x 4" print at 600 dpi corresponds to 3600 x 2400 pixels ~=..... 9 ...


16

You can't restore information that is lost, but if the effect is uniform over the entire image, or at least gradual, you can balance it out to restore the same look as it would originally have. With the added processing you will of course lose even a little more quality, but that is hardly visible. What you might see is that the limitations of the data gets ...


16

So... I'm by no means an expert at this, but... Here's what I did with your image: Duplicate image layer Apply gaussian blur to new layer (mine was 2.9 pixels, adjust as you desire) Set new layer blending mode to luminosity and adjust opacity to suit Flatten the image Unsharp mask to taste. I used 72% with a radius of 5 and threshold of 4, but play with ...


15

Do you still have access to the original photos? The best thing you can do is to put it on a copy stand with two lights on goosenecks and re-shoot with a good digital camera. You can play with the positions of the two lights to eliminate the texture. Other copy stand possibilities: use crossed polarizers -- one on the lights in one direction, one on the ...


11

If we are talking about global colour shifts, Photoshop has lots of tools to change the colours back, like hue shift, white balance and the tool where you can "Drag" one colour on the gamut towards another. and maybe you need some contrast enhancement. If it is destroyed in a unique spatial pattern, it is much harder. You need to apply correction in a ...


7

I think you can do better than a large radius blur. For removing light coloured dust, a common technique is to duplicate the image, set the blend mode to darken, then nudge (move) the duplicate layer a few pixels so that darker pixels overlay where the dust is (and these darker pixels are from the immediate surrounding area, so match the colour/tone well). ...


6

First, I strongly recommend Ctein's book on photo restoration. It's got all of the gory detail work and techniques in it that are needed for this: Photo repair .com site Not sure what scanner you are using, but modern scanners, even really inexpensive ones, are pretty good. I've done a fair amount of recovery work of family photos using under $100 Canon ...


6

No. Film can only be developed once. What you should do instead is scan the negatives using the highest bit-depth film scanner you can find. Many photo stores can do this if you do not have access to one. Scanners can do 48 bits-per-pixel or even 96 bits-per-pixel now. Some high-resolution scanners can use a special transparency adapter add-on but a ...


6

By doing a quick edit using Fourier Transform as described in this Imagemagick tutorial I managed to considerable reduce the annoying effect when viewed at 100%. A more thorough edit using this method might provide better results, but the repeating pattern appears so often that some areas of the picture are basically left without any detail.


5

I recognize these. I've made them. It is a copper printing plate. They are screened for use directly onto the paper, probably in a letterpress since they are flat. They are made by exposing a print (copy) in a large process camera with a vacuum back to hold the film perfectly flat during a long exposure. The resulting very dense high contrast "lithographic" ...


5

If the data is corrupted, there isn't necessarily a whole lot that can be done to help you since part of the data is gone (unless it got distorted in some kind of a pattern that you can identify and reverse). CR2 stores a preview jpeg in addition to the RAW data, so your viewer is simply looking at the JPEG rather than the RAW data. The RAW data on the ...


5

Try this. Get a sheet of flat wrapping paper bigger than the photo, a broom handle or dowel, and some sticky tape. Partially unroll the photo and place the unrolled part, photo side up (assuming it was rolled up with the photo on the outside), at one corner of the paper, at a 45º angle (so the corner of the wrapping paper and the edge of the photo form a ...


5

Most of the problems are coming from the paper texture, or, rather, from the way the scanner's light source is reflected by the texture. You can minimize that by scanning the photo in several different orientations: vertical; vertical again, but upside-down; horizontal; and horizontal the other way around. Each of those scans will put the highlights of the ...


4

I would you recommend to use FFT method. This way you don't get that blurry picture. All details stay. ImageJ (for Mac) is a good app for that. There are lots of FFT plug-ins for Photoshop you can find on the internet as well.


4

At a pixel level, you want to blur the lighter pixels horizontally, without blurring the picture as a whole too much. I took two times two similar steps in Adobe Photoshop to create the picture below. The first two steps: I selected the white colors using the "Select color range" tool, selecting an almost white pixel and using a large range to select ...


3

There are three main options you can use to uncurl a photo in the condition yours is in. Given the fairly extreme condition your photo is in, I would really recommend option one, and Jim gave further details on that. The other two options may or may not work. Flatten the photo out as much as possible on a flat bed scanner. Placing some moderately heavy ...


3

That's noise. Mostly color noise. You can remove that in Camera Raw using the Luminance and Color Noise reduction sliders


3

Although the RAW file is probably shot, the JPG can be extracted and saved. One of the easiest ways to do this is with IrfanView, a handy little free utility. Using IrfanView, I was able to save a JPG w/ resolution 1936 x 1288 -- I'm not sure how this compares to full resolution of your RAW file, and it's not going to have all the data that the original ...


3

They aren't doing any magic beyond what can be done in Photoshop. You can read yourself in the FAQ: What photo restoration tools do you use to restore my images? Our restoration team is expert in the use of Adobe Photoshop. What training do your photo restoration technicians have? Our artists have been through formal training in color concepts, ...


2

Try a Beifand De-Roller. See the convincing demo here. Consider how long a paper-roll stays rolled and seeing how this one works so easily, it should work for pretty much any rolled print. You may find other option by searching for De-Roller or De-Curler.


2

CR2 is based upon TIFF, containing three JPEG versions (including the raw data) and one TIFF preview. See http://lclevy.free.fr/cr2/#parsing for more information. You could rename the file to a TIFF file and see which TIFF layers hold some recoverable information.


2

It appears that you didn't ruin a museum piece. In this case, what I would do is flatten it and scan it at high DPI, then retouch it in Photoshop. If the emulsion cracks, you can retouch that. I would reproduce the print in as close to original quality as I can. At the same time, I would color correct it for the faded colors and then reproduce the print with ...


2

If this is a thin metal sheet with the picture visible as a negative in slanting light, this plate was used on an offset press and the plate is probably aluminum. The white coating on the surface is possibly just an oxidized surface. Try making a paste with cream of tartar and small amount of warm water to form a paste. With a clean cotton rag try rubbing a ...


2

Given that the pictures seem to be low resolution, no- the plate in the camera 3 shots is just a big blur. If the resolution was higher so that you could distinguish the letters and numbers as individual blurs, you might be able to get something by using deconvolution.


2

There is a method, with formaldehyde gas. But formaldehyde is very very toxic and harmful. (first, read this Formaldehyde TEACH Chemical Summary) It's used for sterilization of surgical and veterinary instruments. You must use it so far away of humans and pets that you can (above all, of children and pregnants). And always somewhere outdoors, with a ...


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