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11

whether lens could be repaired without loosing big amount of money? Whatever the damage, repairing the 18-55 almost certainly isn't worth it. People upgrading sell them for not very much, just get a new one.


10

The black obstruction looks like a detached aperture blade. This is a seriously damaged lens. Repairing it would at least require it to be dismantled and the aperture blades replaced. Possibly there is even more damage. As the lens seems to be on the cheaper side, it seems to be more economic to replace it - maybe with a used one from one on the various ...


6

Note whether there are any symptoms that indicate the elements may be out of order, flipped, or misaligned. There are other reasons lenses may not focus as expected that aren't related to elements being misplaced. Focus may need to be calibrated. The lens may be soft wide open. Draw the lens diagram, as you have it. This can serve as a reference if you ...


3

That appears to be part of your shutter mechanism. It's broken and needs to be replaced. That's probably beyond the ability of a DIYer since it pretty much requires complete disassembly of the camera and some specialized equipment to insure the sensor and lens mount flange are properly aligned when reassembled. Whether sending it out for repair is worth it ...


3

It sounds like you may have bent the aperture lever in the camera body that contacts the aperture lever on the back of the lens. Or you may have bent the lever on the back of the lens that the camera's lever pushes to stop down the aperture just before the shutter opens. This is a fairly common problem when changing lenses on cameras that still use ...


3

The most common cause for the Err message is an issue with the aperture control. A lack of aperture control would also likely affect metering and quite probably live-view (exposure preview). Since you cleaned the contacts on the lens I would assume it's not an older lens with a manual aperture ring (which needs to be locked in the minimum aperture position)....


2

Digital-only solutions: Use a "short" adapter, as rackandboneman suggests. This may also work with rangefinders that have short FFD. Use the yellow filter with custom white balance. Solutions that will also work with film: Black and white photography with the colored filters. Repair the filter using glass from an appropriately sized UV filter. The glass ...


2

It looks like you just broke an UV filter. The metal rim may have warped a bit and this is why your lens cap is stuck. You can try to pry it out but you can also replace it. But you may want to inspect the rest of the lens. The (real) front lens may have scratches caused by the glass shards from the filter (*), and the filter thread may be damaged. You can ...


2

The biggest problem with repairing Nikon lenses yourself is that Nikon no longer sells replacement parts to anyone outsides Nikon's authorized service network, including third party repair shops. To make matters worse, as of March 31, 2020, Nikon is not renewing agreements with any current Nikon authorized outside repair shops that are not owned by Nikon. ...


1

That's hard to say from that image. It could well be dust on the inside of the element, but it could well also be fungus. The third possibility is that it could be scratching from overzealous cleaning in the past. I've seen this more times than fungus on lenses, and if that is the case there's nothing that can be done. Do you have a lens blower? If so, I ...


1

Agree with user:mwallner on this. The film loading door of this model is extremely easy to remove. If you look closely at the hinges, there is a spring loaded pin which enables it to unclip very readily. However, the broken latch is a common issue - so finding a used body without a door is much easier than vice versa. The rewind spool was also known to break ...


1

Relevant information is available both at the Kiev Survival Site and in Isaak S. Maizenberg's book All You Need to Know About Design and Repair of Russian Cameras (1996). The screw you mention is used to calibrate the galvanometer scale. Of this, Maizenberg writes: To shift the galvanometer's scale, insert a screwdriver in the screw slot [...] and ...


1

General advice about old Zeiss lenses like that: Photograph the exact position of all rings and their notches (also, mark the rings beforehand to avoid 180° confusion) with a cellphone or similar, so you can reproduce the exact positions later. Zeiss often used adjusting rings that affect centering... Also, the materials used back then tend to be brittle, ...


1

It looks like the actual lens elements are ok, but the filter on the front was damaged. It also looks like the threading for the filters might have been damaged on the lens as well. These are the actual elements in that lens. The main front element is recessed. That being said, any hit hard enough to damage a lens in that manner could have damaged the ...


1

I'm so sorry to hear what happened to the lens you borrowed. But dropped lenses happen. It appears the lens has been severely misaligned due to the shock of being dropped. Lenses can usually be realigned by a skilled repair technician if nothing is mechanically broken and the range of adjustment allows for any slightly bent parts. This is something not even ...


1

I wouldn't clean lens elements with used sensor swabs. Any unseen dust that had been removed by the swab could scratch the coatings/glass of the lens element. Other unseen contaminants could also wind up on the lens element. I would consider using the plastic part of the swab with a clean Pec-Pad attached to the tip of the swab. Pec-Pads are actually made ...


1

While you may be able to reassemble the aperture using the method you describe, the problems you face are: The previously positioned blades will pop out of place when you try to slide a new blade under them. The housing wall makes it difficult to hold the blades in place during the process. As you guessed, there is a trick to reassembling the contraption. ...


1

Viable methods of repair depend on the extent of the damage and type of cement involved. Repairing minor separation (including small discrete bubbles and crazing) Balsam is used in the preparation of permanent histology slides, which may develop separation and bubbles. A trick I learned from a lab tech is to stick the slides in an oven. The heat melts the ...


1

A similar issue just happened to me with my Nikkor AF-S DX VR 18-200mm but instead of not getting below 0.9m, mine was a bit higher. My lens had been in storage for several years due to the fact that I basically moved to full-frame D600 and as such, I had really no need to use that lens along with my D7000. Today, I was forced to press the lens and the ...


1

On my A720 there is a similar double move needed. The button is pressed down and made to slide, then it needs to be held down and pushed at right angles to the initial slide. It is similar but not identical to the two red arrows at right angles near A on the picture above.


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