7

Imagine your subject in a very small room, and the walls are painted in red. A large window is giving you some very lovely soft light on the subject's face. You have decided there is no need for fill light (either because the light is soft enough, or you are happy with the contrast/shadow). But wait, since the room is so small, the sunshine is hitting on ...


6

I am not sure about who used the Beauty Dish for photography first, but the principle of evenly illumination via secondary reflection is accredited to danish mathematician Piet Hein, who constructed the R(a) - lamp in 1931 to alleviate the harsh direct light from the electric bulb in reading-situations. source: http://www.futuraoslo.no/index.php?/produkter/...


5

When artificial lights are used in photography they're commonly diffused such as with a softbox. If the light has to be bounced off something to get it to the right place, the diffusing can be combined with the reflecting. The difference in reflectivity isn't that great - no more than about than a stop, depending on how much of the scattered light is ...


5

Having been through this myself in an attempt to use a reflector all by myself: Something like this - its an adjustable arm that attaches to a lightstand and lets you pivot the reflector around. It works fairly well with two/three big downsides. One, the stand really really needs to be weighted then, it just too off balance otherwise. Two, it takes up A ...


4

I was in your situation and after playing arond with some light bulbs and a borrowed manual flash I've discovered that (unsurprisingly) a flash is better. You can get a YN480 flash on eBay for arond $40 - it's a manual flash, that means you have to put the camera on manual mode and adjust exposure and flash power manually (but it's easier than it sounds, I ...


4

With that type of a budget, you are much better going the DIY route, putting in some of your own time instead of your own money. For portrait photography, you can find a huge benefit to having a beauty dish. I made one of these myself for only a few dollars. You can find examples of how to do so on many internet forums, but here is one example. These were ...


3

I would say the sun is peeping through that very dark cloud because: The light on the photographer's leg is too harsh not to be the sun (clouds would heavily defuse the light). There is a heavy shadow of the photographer and assistant on the sand in keeping with the direction of the sun, again we wouldn't see this in defused light by the clouds. I would ...


3

For a long shot you don't need to worry about brightening the face so much. Lighten it in post — the small feature can tolerate a little more noise. Bracket the shot so you can swap in brighter faces if necessary. When starting with digital, I remember being impressed with how that simplified fill light especially working alone.


3

The foil reflector gives a more soft and diffused light.


3

A black reflector has several usages. The main one is to block light when you have a light environment and you want darker shadows on that side. On this example, the "studio" has white walls, and you want a more dramatic shadow, so you need to "absorb" some of the lights on the shadow side, so it does not bounce back. It is very important when taking ...


3

Maybe you could use a remote shutter release and hold the reflector yourself?


2

Get the model to hold it For head shots, the model can hold the reflector - just get them to hold it as if they were carrying a tray of drinks.


2

You can use a reflector holder/bracket like this, or one of the cheaper versions, although most of the reviews at this price level are complaints about the products not working. An even cheaper solution could be something like a length of wooden dowel and some clamps like these.


2

The 2 lightstands is not a good option for reflective surface for locations. It is a waste of 1 lightstand anyway. And you have now a big parashute. Take a look at big foldable reflectors: https://www.google.com.mx/search?q=foldable+big+reflector&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj-9f2xrarKAhXKqR4KHSeyBGgQ_AUIBygB&biw=1177&bih=625 ...


2

Without going into technicalities, I can provide some user experience. Having hired both reflectors for a previous job; firstly, the Zoom reflectors were a lot smaller, 7-8in in diameter and about 6in depth and the Widezoom reflector was a lot larger, about twice the size from what I can recall. The zoom reflector at position 10 gave a harder shadow than ...


2

While not exactly a softlight reflector as in the beauty dish, bounce lighting itself was first used in 1956 by Subrata Mitra, but in cinema. The technique itself was devised to overcome difficulties with exposure that were encountered while filming Aparajito, which is the second amongst the three films of the famous Apu Trilogy by Satyajit Ray. If there ...


2

Chris already mentioned the softbox, and indeed photographic reflectors work similarly. If you would use a strobe flash without a softbox (or brolly) you'd have a point-like light source which gives hard light and ditto shadows. A softbox acts as a secondary light source, i.e. it captures the hard light from the flash, and diffuses it over a larger surface. ...


2

ND filter and HSS flash both can achieve same results That is a bit oversimplified. ND-filters (ND stands for "Neutral Density", which basically means that they [ideally] filter out equal amounts of all visible wavelengths) simply reduce the amount of total EV that your camera gets - with the same settings than before, your picture will become darker. HSS ...


1

The answer... Use whatever you have. (Forget ISO for now) The main line of reasoning is: 1. If you want bokeh or shallow depth of field you need a wide aperture. 2. If you use a wide aperture you need a fast shutter speed. 3. If you want some directionality in the light you need additional light than the ambient one. Here we have some options. a. Use a ...


1

"I've used it as an example of how effective reflected sunlight can be to for fill on a subject who otherwise would be too dark due to shadowing." Reflected ambient light is used to eliminate or soften shadows on the subject that would otherwise create bizarre, awkward, or otherwise inappropriate effects. In field portraiture, for example, reflectors are ...


1

I had one in 1971. Made by Photax as part of its Interfit range of tungsten lighting for photographers. It wasn't called a beauty dish back then though. Might have been called a softlight or similar. Still got the Photax stands and standard reflectors. Accidentally trod on the softtlight so haven't got it anymore.


1

Think of the possibility of lightening the shadows with a flash or 2. But if you want to use just reflectors I would not use just one silver. This gives you a very narrow area of light. Try using 2 big white foamboards. (1 assistant can hold the 2 lying on the ground.) Or if you can afford 2 assistants you can use 2 silver ones and make them light ...


1

One thing you can try, providing your subjects aren't ridiculously far from the camera, is to take 1-3 speed light flashes that mount on a bracket that goes on top of a light stand. Keep the lights low and sync them so they all fire at the same time. Use a large silver reflector and fire the flashes away from your subjects and onto the reflector. You could ...


1

I agree with @claraonager: anyone in attendance gets to be a gaffer. I just found some "nano" paracord and picked up a 300-foot spool to add to my bag, but have not used it yet. Small (half-inch) binder clips pack in a small light space, easily grab a cloth, and have a handy place to tie paracord on. Look at surplus "space blankets" for reflector ...


1

You can also have a look on Amazon at YN 462 it's under $35, I have two of YN 460 and I love them. Add to it a white umbrella for around $7 and if you can stretch your budget a few more dollars, you can also buy a light stand for about $12.


1

With such a tight budget every penny counts. Instead of getting the 5-in-1 reflector I recommend saving $9 and just getting a sheet of white posterboard. Alternatively save $7 and get a sheet of white foamcore. With the remaining budget I think you're basically limited to using standard high-wattage CFL light bulbs in clamp lights like can be found at a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible