56

Certainly the biggest factor is the dynamic range processing. The room is so bright, and shares the same color temperature as the outdoors daylight lighting. Yet the shadows in the balcony and near the glass door, which are closer to the light source, are the darkest parts of the scene. Also, one "fakeness" indicator that your mind might not have caught, ...


24

The thing that sets off the alarm is the perfectly bright and uniform lighting in the room, especially on its ceiling. The room should be quite dark, since the sun is on the other side of the building (according to the building in the background). You can see through the window (and in the big mirror) that the ceiling of the balcony is more realistically in ...


21

The focus seems too even to me.  I would expect a photo taken to have something blurrier, either in the foreground or background.


14

You aren't going to be able to make your yard look like summer, in winter. What you can do is slow down (you said you were rushed), properly frame and compose the images, shoot in RAW, and shoot at a few different times of the day - try the hour after sunrise and hour before sunset. You also could just wait for a sunny day - although in most places that is ...


13

Generally speaking, the US Copyright Office's terse answer is a complete reply: the copyright of the photo belongs to the photographer. The owner of the property may also have some rights which could limit the photographer's commercial use of the material (including, for example, selling it to you). I know one old photo seems like a little thing and it ...


11

A good overview of the techniques for shooting this type of 360x180/equirectangular/VR panorama can be found on Eric Rougier's fromparis website. The basic process is to shoot enough images to cover the entire sphere, and then stitch them together as a panorama. Mappings Those "six shots" you're seeing are typically remapped cube faces from a full ...


11

Apart from what others have suggested (shooting raw, playing with white balance and saturation, shooting at golden hour...) I would try and change your composition a little. Try taking a shot from a little further to the right, so that your driveway creates something like a "leading line" to guide the view into the picture. This is a tip very commonly given ...


10

You can correct lens distortion in post, but you do so at the expense of some of that higher resolution. Roger Cicala of LensRentals.com says in a blog post where he tests the uncorrected and post corrected resolution of an EF 24-105mm f/4 L lens at 24mm: But when someone wants to argue that they buy a lens with high distortion because it has higher ...


8

Like any lighting, this is not a simple one-size-fits-all type of deal. You have to think it through. Light should very much feel organic in the image and should have a reason for being there (i.e., "motivated light"). Nothing is more jarring than a light source in an image that your brain tells you just shouldn't be there. So think what light sources in ...


8

A halo like the ones on the image is always caused by subtle divergence of light coming from a source. Possible remedies: Good quality lenses have anti-reflection coatings on the lens elements to avoid light bouncing back and forth between two element, and lack of this could create this problem. You might need to upgrade your lens. Or, check if you are ...


8

That's the nature of HSS. Instead of one full-power firing of the flash at a point when the entire sensor is exposed, it has to fire a series of very fast flashes at different points while different sections of the sensor are exposed between the slit caused by the first and second shutter blades. Otherwise, you'd get one band of well lit exposure through ...


7

I find that a 20-28mm lens (full frame) or a 14-20 (cropped sensor) to be the most useful focal lengths. I am a real estate agent that was a professional photographer for 12 years. I shoot primarily my own listings, listing for some of my agents and the occasional paid shoot for various other agents. I personally own a 10-20mm Sigma on a Nikon D7000. I ...


5

Lens distortion can be corrected for automatically by programs like Lightroom, Photoshop or PTLens for the bold, if a profile for that lens exists (and if not, you can pretty easily make one yourself). Sharpness cannot be recovered in post, so this seems like a no-brainer. Take the sharp but distorted lens and let your software auto-correct it, with no ...


5

Start by cleaning the lens. A dirty lens may cause this, however it is also possible it is simply a property of your lens. If you can't get rid of it, either use a better lens or work around it by taking photos that don't have the lights directly in them.


5

Don't stand directly in front of the house. That angle is boring. Move to the side if possible to capture the angles of the structure. You may have to get a lens with a low focal length (14mm or 12mm) to capture the yard and the house in one shot (without capturing the neighbors' property too). Wait for a clear or partly cloudy day with lots of blue sky. ...


5

This is how to sell your house, but it's just wrong. Taking photos There's so little light that it barely casts shadows. Regardless of how much light there is in winter, taking the photo when the sun is at your back and not too high in the sky will maximize the light on the building. You can try standing back farther and using a long lens (telephoto), and ...


4

Exposure fusing is a different technique of combining images than HDR algorithms. So, it's basically having another way of doing a similar task. Photomatix, for example, performs both exposure fusing and HDR. What an HDR technique is doing is to remap the values of the set of images along a scale large enough to encompass the entire high dynamic range, ...


4

If the place has no ceiling, bring your own. White cardboard is an obvious cheap one. Styrofoam is lightweight and holds its shape better than cardboard (depending on the thickness of your cardboard. Any "professional" reflector will make you look more professional, but at a cost. For some clients it could be bad to show up with some cardboard. "Are you ...


4

An wide-angle lens is a must to get photos straight out of the camera for most interiors. Anything 25mm and under is considered ultra-wide, some cameras go down to 22.5mm now. Frequently that will not be wide enough and so a lot of real-estate photography is done by stitching multiple images together to form a panorama. What you really need to nail this ...


4

IANAL so you should ask one. The answer in your situation is likely to be very complex and greatly depends on where you are located and the particular contracts between the parties. ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE, NOR DOES IT REPLACE ANY Broadly speaking, in most parts of the world, including Canada since November 7th, the copyright of the ...


4

Start by shooting camera raw files. Even if the following is beyond you (or your tools), make the full raw file available in dropbox or something like that, referenced in your post: people may help you out with example adjustments, and will do far better than with the jpeg that’s already been processed “all wrong” for the look you want. Also shoot a grey ...


4

Ideally, go back in a summer month to photograph it. But if this is what you have to work with some starting points: Replace the sky with something blue and has some clouds. Get rid of the barren trees using clone stamp. Shift the colors towards the Yellow a tad but make sure to pull it out of the sky - don't want to end up with yellow clouds. Then burn ...


3

One quick suggestion is to bounce the flash (light, not the actual unit) off the ceiling or other large (white) surface to diffuse and spread the light. My other recommendation is to shoot from a lower position so the verticals aren't converging as much. The more you can keep the back of the camera level (i.e. not tilted) the better. See here for more tips.


3

When choosing an ultrawide lens for a camera, you do want to consider a few factors: Focal lengths. With ultrawide zooms, while 10mm vs. 12mm may not seem like a lot of difference, the wider the lenses go, the more those individual millimeters mean in terms of the field of view you're going to receive from the lens. Given that your two choices are ...


3

Phones that run android can do this. Simply download the Google Camera app and use the Google Photo Sphere function. Ideally one should do this on a real (system)camera that runs Android eg Samsung Galaxy NX.


3

In addition to what others have said, here are some suggestions. Just as with landscapes, shoot at sunrise/sunset to get golden light on everything. One trick I've seen for outdoor shots of houses is to open all the shades, turn on all the lights inside, and shoot just after sunset. This will get a blue-ish outdoor light with a warm indoor light. I'd also ...


3

Your lens should go from about a 67 degree (horizontal) field of view to about 93 degrees, based on one of the handy calculator apps I have on my phone. Since most rooms are roughly based on 90 degree corners, that should be a suitable improvement. As an alternative, you could look for a 10-11mm lens (not sure if such a thing exists) with either the EF or EF-...


3

Assessment based on photos found by @shoover. The exteriors match reality (Google aerial view at least). However some trickery is going on there. In another comment I mentioned long (or multiple) exposures to account for massive depth of field to maintain focus. Looking at images 1/35 and 6/35 from the set in the link it is possible to see ghost ...


3

Shadows — or the lack of. This makes the scene look like a computer rendering with ambient lighting coming from everywhere. The walls and ceiling look sterile and a little too pristine. And whatever treatment was given to the scene outside the windows (some kind of tone mapping) made that look flat, and the reflection on the window happens to look just ...


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