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8

Quite likely your application is displaying the built-in JPEG thumbnail from the RAW, while it tries to decode the RAW. Then when it is done it replaces the thumbnail by its own interpretation of the full RAW. So it would all depend on your application's RAW decoding defaults and support for your particular camera. Given the size of SD cards these days, you ...


6

An edited RAW file would need to be interpreted by exactly the same software you used to initially edit it. This is just not practical. If you export as a TIFF with your camera's .icc profile embedded [or potentially pre-converted to sRGB], you will lose no data & the receiver will be able to extract the image you intended. The only issue with TIF is ...


6

It is common for in-camera JPEG to apply a sharpening filter — often a quite strong one. Ufraw is rather dated. Use Rawtherapee or Darktable and include a sharpening step.


6

That very much looks like a reflection of the lens on the protective glass to me... along with another reflection from something outside. It does not look like banding due to editing. This is the kind of thing one might see with an SLR lens that has an uncoated filter on it. IDT there is anything you can really do about it. In more normal conditions it is ...


5

Many advices say RAW files are not affected by picture control. However, when shooting, LCD shows preview according to picture control selected. The "many advices" are precisely correct, so I think you maybe are not getting the meaning. The raw data in the raw file is Not affected by the camera settings (other than exposure). However, raw files ...


5

The reason is, that the RAW RAF file is not an image per se. It is sensor data. To display it, the data has to be interpreted into an image. This is done by a piece of code and takes a little while. Being interpretation, the result may differ between programs. What you see in Windows is that the explorer or most editors shows you a low-res jpg which is ...


5

The CR2 format is the Canon raw sensor data as opposed to an image. It is losslessly compressed. Some newer Canon cameras support CR3 format which can be compressed in a very slightly lossy manner. I suspect the TIFF files were created from the CR2 files. Usually, cameras cannot store the pictures as TIFF; they can store as JPEG (heavily lossily compressed) ...


4

Is there any valid reason to not choose the C-RAW option on recent Canon cameras? That's kind of like asking, "Is there any valid reason to not choose the JPEG option on recent digital cameras?" Of course the answer to that is, "Not unless you need the complete raw data." Likewise, the answer to your question is, "Not unless you find yourself in a ...


3

That all depends on the specific source of the "raw" images. "Raw" isn't a file format, or even a type of file. It's just a catchphrase we use to refer to image information recorded at the most basic level by a camera. Since different cameras can and often will do things differently, exactly what a raw file contains and does not contain can vary from one ...


3

A RAW file does not consist of pixels with multiple color coordinates. It consists of a single value from each sensor well on the sensor. Those values must be demosaiced by an algorithm that has some knowledge of the Bayer or other filter that sits in front of the sensor wells. These algorithms take the value of each well and those from some small ...


3

Because when you look at an image on your screen you are almost certainly not looking at a literal depiction of the information contained in a raw image file, you are looking at one of near countless possible interpretations of the information contained in the raw file. Many of these interpretations are equally valid as a "correct" way to process the ...


3

The JPEG doesn't look any better or more readable to me. It has WB applied, and sharpening (visible in the white haloes around the letters, which are then smudged by JPEG compression artefacts.) That said, the RAW seems to suffer from a bad (or inappropriate) demosaicing algorithm which produces the dark dots in the figures. I'd recommend to try other ...


3

Correction: With the last release of LR (June 2020) there is a "Camera Preset" develop preset, which is a camera matching color profile; and in some cases it will pick up some basic/detail adjustments as well (e.g. saturation/sharpening). With my Nikon's, all it does is change the color profile to "Camera Neutral" and all other settings ...


3

I do not think this artifact is caused by reflections in the optical path. I think this is due to software correction of light falloff as a function of distance from image center (i.e., vignetting compensation). Normally such correction is not very noticeable because the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is high enough. But in this case, the image is so dark, that ...


2

I wonder, what algorithms are used to achieve such conversion of colorful noise to colorless one? Is it some high-ISO-optimized demosaicing? Or is it a special denoising algorithm applied after demosaicing? Or something else? Yes. There are different algorithms that can be applied at various stages of processing. You can look at a raw processing ...


2

Try adding some noise to the sky. This will ease the transitions between the bands of color. Here's a good reference for doing so: https://www.dpmag.com/how-to/tip-of-the-week/identifying-repairing-banding/


2

The CR3 raw format is relatively new (introduced with Canon's mirrorless line, and produced by any camera using the DIGIC 8 or later chipsets). As such, not all non-Canon software can support the format yet. It may take some time before your favorite applications support it. Until then, you can use the Canon software that came with your camera. Looking at ...


2

The "Sony E 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6 OSS PZ" lens is listed in lensfun's database as supported starting with version 1.534, but it does not yet appear that there's an entry for the Alpha 6100. If you visit the web site, you can find instructions for generating images to submit for them to analyze to get new cameras and/or lenses supported. The documentation also ...


2

You are right. RAW is pretty raw, but of course the camera manufacturers are incorporating different strategies on optimizing signal to noise ratio. While I am sure that most of these are secret, one commonly incorporated feature is a statistical de-noising process which, when enabled on long exposures, does another secondary exposure with closed shutter to ...


2

My answer will be very much opinion based. But first let me clarify one point: Canon RAW is also compressed, lossless. And for me size is not so important, at the end those days storage is cheap, 12TB external disk cost around 260 euro and you can store there 300k 40MB images. For cloud storage you can use (for example) Amazon Prime Photo, which is around ...


2

This is likely due to the AI processing aspect of most phone cameras. When a phone camera takes a photo its often (Especially on newer models) not as simple as taking a single sensor readout and processing it. They often are buffering frame the entire time the sensor and camera app are open, once you press the image button multiple exposures are taken (...


2

If you're talking about how long it will take your machine to open and display an interpretation of the information in the raw file it's most likely fairly negligible. Of course it would depend on many variables: Image size in terms of numbers of photosites (you don't really have "pixels" until after demosaicing). A 9000 x 6000 pixel image will ...


2

Anytime you open a raw file and look at it on your screen, you are not viewing "THE raw file." ¹ You are viewing one among a near-countless number of possible interpretations of the data in the raw file. The raw data itself contains a single (monochrome) brightness value measure by each pixel well. With Bayer masked camera sensors (the vast ...


1

White balance does matter in Darktable. From the Darktable User Manual: 1.3.2.2. White balance The white balance module controls the white balance or color temperature of the image. It's always enabled and reads its default values from camera metadata embedded in the image. 3.4.1.10. White balance This module is used to set the white ...


1

Yes, raw images are really raw (with few other pieces of information). You may have hardware processing (nano optics, physics, electronic amplification, etc), but then the result is stored in a raw file. In there you won't have pixels yet, but the photosites (RGBG in a bayer pattern usually) information, and the raw development consists in creating those ...


1

Thanks you guys for your answers! I ultimately decided to download Adobe Camera Raw in order to convert them to DNG files as @KaiMattern has pointed out, albeit with drawbacks :D


1

The Nikon focus points map like this. What that means in terms of image pixel size IDK... a lot more than 1. FWIW, this is nothing like how the AF sensor/sensor lines actually look/work. The exif for a D850 image reads like this: AF Area Mode : Group Area Phase Detect AF : On (153-point) AF Points Used : E12 Primary AF Point : C12 Which means: Group ...


1

A raw image file includes single luminance values measured at each photosite (a/k/a "sensel" or "pixel well"). Each single value tells how much light energy was absorbed by each photosite. These values are listed in a specific sequence. At this point there is no "color" information in the way you seem to expect. There is only a single luminance value for ...


1

Try Irfanview, or DXO. I'd recommend Irfanview as it is light weight and fast, and I've used it to quickly edit/exclude photos during soccer matches (thousands of photos).


1

It is a processing/software artifact and the same as what is encountered when tone mapping HDR images... that's basically what you are doing; re-mapping the tones, only w/in a single image. Also check other contrast type settings; sharpening, clarity, etc. Those types of settings try to preserve/increase the perception of details by adding localized ...


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