13

What you describe is similar to what astrophotographers call lucky imaging (or speckle imaging). The idea behind lucky imaging is to take several (hundreds, even thousands) of very short exposures and only keep the few images that appear to be the least disturbed by atmospheric distortions. In a general sense, taking more images than needed in order to ...


8

Many time lapse cameras already do this, but on a shorter time scale. For example, GoPro mentions in TimeWarp documentation: For the best results, try speeds 10x and up when shooting footage that may get bumpy. Higher speed will often provide better stabilization as there are more frames for TimeWarp to choose from Which sounds like it is selecting the ...


7

They don't. You're interpreting the raw data wrong. According to the PiCamera documentation, the Pi's 10-bit raw data is encoded as 5 bytes in the following manner: The Pi's Bayer array is BGGR. So the first four bytes contain the most significant bits (bits 10–3) of the blue, green1, green2, and red sensels, respectively. The fifth byte of data packs the ...


4

Radial Falloff What you are seeing is known as radial falloff. The coloration is a result of the green-magenta compensation common to most color correction schemes in RGGB (bayer) sensors. Basically, the amount of light lost as you move to the edges of the frame is normal and more green is lost because there is more green sensitivity. Flat Field Correction ...


3

Your premise is wrong and lies already in the definition of noise. if it would affect all sensor sites equally, it wouldn't be noise but only an offset. Noise means that some more-or-less random value is added to the signal, different for each sensor site. That's what makes it so hard to remove. see What is noise in a digital photograph? for an explanation ...


2

An IR filter reduces a portion of visible light as well. You would do well to ask for the transmission curves at the camera detector with and without the filter. Determine what spectral range you need to cover in your "light" and "background" regions. By example, when you cannot accept that an IR filter will cut 10% of the visible dark red region of your ...


2

It seems I found the cause of this problem, or at least a solution for it. The PICam sensor comes with a lens shading correction table, in form of an RGGB array, that may cause, or solve this color shifting. This setting isn't accessible in the official library, you must install this commit in order to access it : https://github.com/waveform80/picamera/pull/...


2

Given that sensor noise affects all sensor sites equally/randomly, why does the raw unprocessed Bayer data have such prominent vertical stripes? As @scottbb already explained the RAW format layout and why this creates the striped (in the chat session), you should know now that these are just low level "noisy bits" from four sensor sites (BGGR) combined into ...


2

tl;dr– Sounds like you want a feature-vectorized video recording where minor/transient features are filtered out, producing a video that shows the conceptual evolution of the scene over time. You probably want a video of the major features' evolution. If you just wanted a time-lapse video of images, you could just do that. However, you're asking about a ...


2

The aperture is not affected by crop factor, so the aperture of the 800 mm lens with 2× teleconverter is just ƒ/11. So the image would be darker than the lens without the teleconverter by 2 stops. You would not have an aperture of ƒ/90. If you took an image of a particular subject with a full frame camera on the EF 800 + teleconverter combo, and then used ...


1

In practice your images are going to be blurry due to diffraction. At f/11, a single point of light creates a disk of 11µm, and your pixels are around 1.5µm. Your camera starts being diffraction-limited at around f/4, so it is likely that the 2X extender, while reducing the field of view, makes the image sufficiently more blurry to compensate for any gain.


1

Since you are using a raspberry pi, have you thought about connecting it up to some fill lights. You could set it up so the lights only turn on for some of the pictures if you still want to do a lot of shots during the day. At least that way, your plant is guaranteed to have some kind of standard amount of light on it regardless of what is going on in the ...


1

I've had success in the past with CCTV lenses mounted to webcams in place of their original lenses. The tricky part is securely and accurately mounting the two together - we had a part machined for one application, but I've also used the front of a dead CCTV camera and lots of glue. The positioning has to be correct in three dimensions to work well. As ...


1

It would be possible to use any small telescope or monocular or one side of binocular. You figure out a way to allow mount one of these devices to your webcam. The lens of the webcam is positioned to peer into the telescope/binocular. This method is called "afocal". The name comes from the fact that the image forming rays from the telescope/binocular exit ...


1

There is a full module of python code that you can use to control everything from the exposure, to the color balance, shutter speeds and such. You can find all the goodies here: http://picamera.readthedocs.io/en/release-1.12/index.html I have used the older camera (which had a far less profound sensor) in some pretty unusual ways. You can control a lot ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible