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Normally, push processing is used with underexposed film. The typical effect can be seen in the film, Barry Lyndon, nearly all of which was push processed: Still image from Barry Lyndon Overdeveloping the film grows the grains bigger, so that it brings out details in underexposed areas, and reduces detail in normally exposed areas. If most of the ...


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When you push an ISO 160 film in camera to 400, you are under exposing it by about 1.5 stops. When underexposed, pushing the film in developing is usually pretty forgiving so long as you don't overdo it. What you're effectively doing is telling your meter that the film is more sensitive to light than it really is. When pushed in the developer, the grain ...


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If you exposed at 800, then you should develop at 800. Pushing film with special developing isn't free. It usually makes the grain worse and reduces contrast. You don't want to do it more than necessary. Developing to 1200 after exposing at 800 will give the the drawbacks of pushing the extra 0.6 f-stops without the benefits. In fact, if the pictures ...


4

Usually, one would want to push process film that was underexposed. For overexposed film, one would need to pull the processing to get 'proper' exposure. Let's talk about push and pull for a moment. When shooting film, if one exposes for a film speed faster than the actual speed of the film, one is technically pulling (underexposing) the film. The film ...


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When you underexpose film and compensate by pushing it in development, you will typically see more grain in the highlights, increased contrast, and reduced shadow detail -- all of this heavily dependent on lighting conditions, film and developer. Lots of variables. So yes, if you intend to push your ISO 100 film two stops, you would expose it as if it were ...


4

I have a film strip with TMax-400. Out of 36 frames, I pushed 10 of them to ISO 1600. In the future, use the same camera ISO setting for the entire cassette. Push/pull development is done on the entire roll at once, unless you have your own darkroom. If I want it to develop in my local store. How should I instruct them to develop my negatives? First, ...


3

When you set the ISO on camera, that is the adjustment to compensate for increased development time. Any further changes to shutter speed or aperture would change the exposure further. In the scenario you describe, you want to process ISO 400 film at ISO 1600. That is a two-stop increase in development. So exposure has to decrease by two stops. Based on ...


3

In case those 10 pushed shots are of great importance, there is a method to develop then without ruining (most of) the unpushed frames. This method requires scissors, a darkroom or changing bag, some basic maths and a dose of luck. Also, this will only work if the pushed frames are consecutive and on one end of the roll. Things you have to know before you ...


3

As xiota said, don’t do this in the future. You have 10 frames that are underexposed, which would need more dev time to compensate. But, if you do that, then your 26 normal frames will overdevelop. The best thing you can do is develop at home1. If the 10 frames are all in a row, and preferably all to the beginning or end of the roll, then simply cut them ...


3

The optimal results using any film will be at ~box speed with standard development. I say ~box speed because even the box speed might be slightly off for a batch. In critical film work, one often buys film in bricks or batches so that a roll can be shot at varying ISO's, processed, and then the best ISO chosen for the rest (best being determined by film ...


3

There is an old saying in old photography that pretty much summarizes how to think about exposure and development: Expose for shadows, develop for highlights That is, you control shadows with exposure and highlights with development. While you can influence the shadows slightly with development, overdeveloping an underexposed negative (commonly referred ...


3

If you use an external light meter, you should set its ISO setting to match the film in your camera. You use the meter to measure the light, and it tells you what aperture and shutter speed to set on your camera. It's as simple as that. You cannot just set any ISO value on the meter. Because that's not the sensitivity of the film in your camera. If you set ...


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A light meter is a device to indicate the amount of electricity produced by a photocell according to the level of luminance. It correlates light intensity to a numerical index. The resulting numerical index (reading) is then used with a calculator (mechanical or algorithmic) to indicate a combination of intensity and time settings for an exposure by an ...


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We use the light meter to gauge scene brightness. We set our camera's exposure based on the light meter reading augmented by experience. Our goal might be reduced contrast -- we pull. Our goal might be increased contrast -- we push. One axiom - expose for the shadows and then develop for the highlights -- it still stands! However I like this modification -- ...


2

The reason you need to "push process" ISO 160 film metered at ISO 400 is because you "pulled exposure" by 1 1/3 stops when you shot it. That is, you underexposed your film by metering at ISO 400 when your film is only ISO 160. So you then need to overdevelop the film by 1 1/3 stops to compensate. The language can be confusing because many photographers say ...


2

I am not a fan when it comes to pushing or pulling color film. Yes, I know these techniques can be beneficial, especially so if the camera exposure is known to be in error. That being said, old time black & white photographers often quote the adage,” expose for the shadows and develop for the highlights.” I never liked that axiom, but I often employed it....


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If you've put T-Max 400 in the camera and set the ASA/ISO dial to 1600, when the camera's meter indicates '0' at 1/250 @ f/2.8 you're already underexposing by two stops. This is because the meter thinks you've got 1600 speed film in the camera, but the film in the camera is still 400 speed. It doesn't magically change its chemical properties just because you ...


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You usually push by keeping the film longer in developer or using a different temperature for the developer. I haven't yet heard of anyone using more concentrated developer for pushing. You also have to consider what developer you use. Concentrations and times might vary from one developer to another. Ilford official website - Push Processing: It is ...


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You should research/test for your film stock. Note that TriX is about the most versatile film ever. I've pushed it to 1600 successfully, and the net has plenty of examples of it pushed to 3200. Look/ask around for what that will do to the contrast and resolution. Pushing TriX a stop will arguably have little effect if processed right. More importantly ...


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