5

I believe as I am the copyright holder this would be OK, even if there is no model release, right? Or would I have to make them sign a model release so I could use the photos of them on my site? Regardless of what you can get away with under your local laws and the terms of your contract, why would you use those photos against your client's wishes? As a ...


5

I don't think that a Facebook photo page alone will do much. Facebook's revenue model involves only showing posts to a subset of your potential audience — even those who have "Liked" your page, unless you pay for promotion. Paying to promote posts of photos you really want others to see might get you a bigger audience, but even then... uphill battle. There ...


3

Marketing is one of those dark arts and whether a specific social media service is useful or not depends on how your business works. If you live by referrals and shoot events then a Facebook Page is an excellent tool (as is an instagram account) as you can release a subset of (lo-res, watermarked) images and people love to like/tag themselves which shares ...


2

Facebook themselves have a guide that answers the why here. Use images that are at least 1200 x 630 pixels for the best display on high resolution devices. At the minimum, you should use images that are 600 x 315 pixels to display link page posts with larger images. If your image is smaller than 600 x 315 px, it will still display in the link ...


1

What I generally do is just put direct links to the full size image on my Facebook page. This results in the oneboxing kicking in and automatically converting it to an image like you see there. I don't personally use a paid service, but rather put my images on my owncloud instance which I run myself, but there is no reason you shouldn't be able to use a ...


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