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12

Do NOT do this. Please read this post from Electrical Engineering SE regarding Li-Ion battery. Li-Ion have one failure mode. Fire. And it's not a normal, lighter fire, or even a stove fire. It is a fire-that-burns-in-a-vacuum fire. It's a fire-that-reacts-with-water-and-air fire. Li-Ion is not the battery type to play around with. They are dead not ...


4

Disclaimer: I cannot be held responsible for any damage, injury or risks associated with what I am about to describe. This is an account of my own experience. Please proceed at your own risk. I've seen a few posts out there where some of you have experienced the same misfortune I have with having your additional profoto B2 lithium Ion (Li-Ion) battery ...


3

I think you're confused as to what constitutes "a TTL system". Triggers merely relay the information from the camera to the flash. Whether you're using an AirRemote or a PocketWizard, if you're using Nikon's iTTL system, then you're getting iTTL information and calculations--it's still the same "TTL system" and the same exposure calculation is happening in ...


3

Since "TTL" (system) in your original question is really about "thru the lens" the software the system uses to transmit that information really has no bearing on the exposure value (fstop shutter ISO ) calculation. What language the hardware talks is not changing the message. If the camera wants f8, and you ask a PW you get f8...if you ask another TTL ...


3

I think the answer is a "maybe". You're talking about different hardware running different software. There will be many occasions where the different combinations of hardware and software will reach the same conclusion and give you the same result, but there are times where there's a more borderline condition that will yield a different result. But, I have ...


2

No, not directly. The Air Remote triggers have no way to attach to a flash foot (i.e., there are no hotshoe receiver units in the system). On the Canon side of the fence, there are folks who are sandwiching TTL radio triggers (YN-622, Pixel King, etc.) between the camera hotshoe and the Air Remote, and achieving TTL/HSS with speedlights that way, but with ...


2

Without going into technicalities, I can provide some user experience. Having hired both reflectors for a previous job; firstly, the Zoom reflectors were a lot smaller, 7-8in in diameter and about 6in depth and the Widezoom reflector was a lot larger, about twice the size from what I can recall. The zoom reflector at position 10 gave a harder shadow than ...


1

I would in this case, mount the Yongnuo trigger on the camera to fire the speedlight. Go grab an optical trigger and attach it to the Profoto. If you need an extension cable to make it fire, then try that. You will have to control the B1 manually. Or, toss the Yongnuo and get another Profoto light so you have a uniform system that can be controlled with ...


1

The Zoom Reflector will typically give a hard light (well-defined transitions from light to shadow), as you'll usually have the strobe relatively far from the subject. The Zoom Reflector will focus the light in the direction it's pointing, as opposed to a bare bulb or the built-in reflector on the B1, B2, D2, etc.


1

Can put the Profoto AirTTL on camera hot shoe to TTL and HSS the Profotos and also connect whatever other flash to PokcetWizard, Attached one PocketWizard to SyncPort of the camera.


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