101

Rockwell presents his opinion as fact even when it is actually a contested opinion. Yes, professionals use 24-70 lenses. They aren't for every situation, but there are plenty where they are great go to lenses. The Canon 24-70 f/2.8 II, for example, is one of the most popular zoom lenses ever. I do wedding photography and during the reception, the 24-70 ...


63

The hosts of the wedding chose, for whatever reason, to hire the "official" photographers to document their event. As a guest of those same hosts you should respect the choice they have made and make every effort to accommodate your hosts' wishes. If those hired are less than welcoming and courteous to you, you should still respond to them in a way that ...


41

There are several reasons: For media in particular, this prevents a logo from appearing in media. Events are often covered by multiple photographers and filmed which means that some people working may end up in the media too. Think of a making of video for example. Logos and brands are usually avoided because they may be misinterpreted as en endorsement or ...


40

I have found that the best technique is to leave your equipment at home or at a minimum in your vehicle. Let the paid professionals capture the images they were hired to capture and you enjoy the event as the hosts intended; as a guest.


39

I do offer RAW files for my photos but I don't give them automatically purely because of the size and difficulty to use. A RAW file is substantially larger than even a max quality finished JPEG. Additionally, a RAW file is of no use without a photographer to develop it. It is just raw sensor data and still needs things like color grading and exposure ...


29

I am going to respond to this as the photographer. If and when I am covering a wedding or such an event as you have mentioned, I get really frustrated by guests bringing their DSLRs with them. To the point where I have actually spoken to the bride's mother and suggested that I want so and so to put their camera away as I am finding it a distraction. Don’t ...


28

I used to be a pro, so I can answer this: This is absolutely normal; it is even very good! I consider 30 good pics out of 400 a very good result! The most important point is IMHO that you go over your shots and select. The "reflection process" is important. It is the place where you learn to take good pictures. This is what most amateurs don't do. And this ...


26

As with many things, the end quality depends on the weakest link. Because most cameras are quite good, even cheap ones (even from mobile phones), the weakest link is mostly the person behind the camera. When learning some theory and practice, photographers can work around some pitfalls of cameras, but also knowing the shortcomings of a camera. When that ...


23

One thing to consider is what style of photographer you fashion yourself as. Some schools take more pictures than others and see different success rates. Are you shooting sports? You have no control over the action so you're probably going to spray-and-pray until you get the perfect shot. You may only get 1 sellable photo out of 1000. Are you shooting on ...


19

Ming Thein once said he tapes the brands to "avoid reflections in reflective objects I photograph such as watches." Makes sense if you are into that sort of photography.


17

Wow, are you hosed. You tell them the price before you start. Its too late now. Traditionally, wedding photographers made all their money off prints. If you give them soft copies, you cut yourself out of that profit stream. Bay Area, NYC, Chicago, etc. I wouldn't consider doing a shoot unless I got at least $100 per hour for my time. Plus I'd want more to ...


15

Gear doesn't matter... until it does. While it is true that better gear won't make you a better photographer, it is equally true that any photographer is limited by the capabilities of the gear being used. It's not just "lesser" types of gear that technically constrain photographers. Even the very best available photographic gear imposes technical limits on ...


13

I am somewhat surprised by all the answers that the OP is basically screwed. The lack of contract is a double edged sword, so the newlyweds have the same problems if they are not willing to pay a fair price for the pictures since they did not negotiate up front either. The OP may be able to walk away without giving them anything if they refuse to pay a ...


12

There are tons of reasons out here but one fact remains. A RAW file itself is not an image or photo. It is a sensor reading which can be interpreted a myriad of ways. A RAW file is not a finished product and in most cases an unsuitable deliverable or even unusable for by client. As a professional photographer I want to deliver a finished product: photos that ...


12

I believe what you are asking for here is the correct combination of words to make a professional photographer understand your reason and logic, and allow you to keep snapping pictures. The problem is when you look at it from the angle of the people actually hired to take photos. Let's try another. I'm a DJ by trade. My niece is getting married. She ...


10

For reference I paid $1600 for around 50 photos in the cheapest book the photographer had to offer. We could select photos from 1000 for review, out of which a lot of them were duplicates, closed eyes, weird faces and pictures of trees, pots, and vases. He was only there for the ceremony, and 30min photo shoot with us afterwards, and my wife's getting ...


10

Annie Leibovitz used a Canon 24-70 2.8L for her photoshoot of the Queen Elizabeth of England. So the statement that professionals don't use that lens isn't true. I have shot professionally for 6 years and my 2 go to lenses are the Canon 24-70 2.8L and Canon 70-200 2.8L IS depending on the circumstances.


10

I would expect a professional to simply say, "Sorry, I didn't realize I was disturbing you," and stop shooting the same subjects at the same time. You can still be in the way, even from behind. People don't like ruining other people's shots. You're forcing them to commit little microagressions against you every time they get in your way or make you move. ...


9

Because he doesn't want to advertise for the camera brand. This is probably most common among journalists, who tend to take this seriously. (You want an ad, you pay for it!)


9

Yesterday I was taking photos at our son's graduation event. At middle of the event, another photographer on the other side of the large room took a direct look at me with his camera (Canon with a long lens) and then turned back to continue his job. That may have been a "gear-check" done on me and it immediately reminded me of this question here. Covering ...


9

Lighting for glasses is all about angles. The rule is: angle of incidence equals angle of reflection. Typically, the light would be either above or below the subject so that the reflections off the glasses would angle in the desired direction which is away from the lens, like so: This is a two light shot and, while I still need to work on filling in some ...


9

I would add a fifth one, which may also help to understand the negative analogy: your RAW file is your finest pixel database. It contains more dynamic range than a JPEG file, similarly to a film negative. You can overexpose, underexpose during development (in Lightroom or in an actual lab), and find details in bright and dark corners that you simply cannot ...


9

Which professionals? Different photographers obviously have different needs. As a rule, be suspect of any statement that treats the needs of such a large class of people the same. The Canon EF 24-70 f/4L is a very popular lens, but at $1000, it's not exactly targeted at consumers.


9

Think about it like automobiles. A racing car or a semi-trailer truck would be awful to use on a grocery shopping trip no matter how 'pro' those automobiles are. But, someone who is in the business of moving goods across the country isn't going to pick the racing car or the family car either. Most of the professional photographers I've met or read about ...


8

People have answered this question beautifully. But this question is not about giving clients RAW files instead of JPEG, but rather RAW in addition to JPEG. (note the big difference!) Not having the decency of offering RAW files to your client has got more to do with the attitude of the photographer than anything else. It's like "owning work" or "giving up ...


7

In my opinion you are asking the wrong question. First of all, you shouldn't ask questions of a professional that you would like to hire before taking a look at their portfolio. That is the complete opposite of what I would do. This is a rule, steadfast, true: Let the work speak for itself¹ Does the photographer have an excellent portfolio full of the type ...


6

We hired a family member who is trying to get his professional business off the ground. He charged $500 for the day, plus $250 for a photo CD including rights to copy/share/print. That was a steal; the next lowest bidder wanted $1000 for the day, required us to buy a precompiled album (included in that $1000 "sitting fee"), wanted an additional $200 for a ...


6

The first shot does not require multiple exposures, or any complex lighting set up, there's nothing to suggest it wasn't just window light from the left. Light from a large window on an overcast day is about as good as you ever get for this type of photography. The second shot could have been one exposure for inside and one for the outside as seen through ...


6

I think there's a couple of points here: There's one set of things that a professional photographer might find annoying and another set that might make an innocent guest feel insulted. But since lines are not sharp it behooves both sides to step back and create some sort of a "demilitarized zone" in the middle. i.e. There's a range of behaviors that most ...


6

A "Good quality camera" is Very important to good quality photography, however the real question you are looking for is something like "what aspects make for good quality in a camera for a given subject matter?" Cameras are tools, and you use a tool suited to the task at hand. A small tack hammer is not much use in driving railroad spikes or breaking up ...


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