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Product photography of jewelry is not optically tricky. The kit lens you already have will do nicely. No need to rush out and buy a 50mm. That said, a 50mm prime with a large aperture, say f/1.4 will deliver shallow depth-of-field when set to maximum or near maximum (wide-open). The real trick will be cutting the glare radiating from polished metal and ...


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While any color can serve you well, three ways have emerged that can help you: White background You simply have a white background and try to illuminate that so much, that the RGB value for this reaches 255/255/255 which means it is pure white. Pro: Very clean image Contra: Need to be careful not to overblow the background so much that the edges of the ...


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The less likely the background color is to appear in the subject the easier it is to remove the background. Chromakey green is a very specific shade. Green is good because the subject is rarely a plant and fashionable clothes are unlikely to include the exact shade. The white of “blown highlights” is another option because it is readily achievable with ...


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The example image was taken with extremely soft/diffused light similar to what you should get from the polytunnel; duplicating that with softboxes for large products can be quite difficult/expensive. And the image looks more like a photoshop cutout than having been taken on a white BG. If that's your goal, then you just need to use a BG that makes selecting/...


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With enough space to put a white backdrop behind the plants, it's jut a case of lighting the backdrop brighter than the plant so that the white backdrop blows out before the plant does. The more space you can include between the plant and the backdrop the easier this will be. Use a flash inside a large modifier placed slightly above the camera to light the ...


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I am not sure where you want to include the backdrop, if the space is as restricted as in the example image. And some of the plants may not be movable. Regarding lighting, you actually could use the diffused light as an excellent fill light. Usually you want to have soft light anyways, and that is exactly what the polytunnel provides. If you want to take the ...


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There are 2 approaches if we exclude focus-stacking: Increasing depth of field is the most obvious approach, but it still has limits with respect to how much depth of field you can actually achieve. The easiest way to increase depth of field is to use the minimum aperture supported by your lens and if that is still not enough, look for another lens that ...


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The ultimate solution to depth of field (at the cost of some overall sharpness) is to use a pinhole aperture. Google for "pinhole photography" -- most DSLR and mirrorless cameras can use a body cap with pinhole mounted, optionally with macro extension tube(s) to get the framing you want at a distance you can use. The utility of a pinhole in this ...


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Selling photography equipment is no different than selling anything else: post it to as many marketplaces as you can. There's eBay, Craigslist, OfferUp, NextDoor, and on and on. If you are in a decent sized city, there's probably a dedicated photography store like a https://prophotosupply.com or https://www.bhphotovideo.com that would take in your used gear ...


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