New answers tagged

2

Mirror-less does not suggest extended shutter life, as there is still a shutter in Canon mirrorless cameras. (There is not a mirror of course). The three current mirrorless models from Canon are the EOS R and RP, and the M. The R states a shutterlife of 200k actuations, while the RP has 100k actuations. The M has 100k. For comparison, the Canon 5D has 150k, ...


0

place a softbox and turn on the lights facing the mirror set the camera to the side so that when you look through the camera lens the angle should be that the mirror should reflect the white light of the softbox that way you'll get a bright white in the center of the mirror :)


1

From the comments: If you show me an alogrithm capable doing this, I am more than happy to automate it. For a software approach I would try to use OpenPose, a deep-learning based human posture tracking stack. They have pre-packaged builds so you don't need to recompile anything yourself. You just need to download the neural network model, put stuff in ...


2

If you have guides to align shoulders/lower edge and possibly the center of the t-shirt, you don't need to play with opacity to align on a model. I don't know PS, but with Gimp: There is an ofn-preset-guides script to create custom guides with a single keystroke There is an ofn-file-next script that does "Save & close current image, open next" that can ...


3

I'm going to take an oblique approach to answer what I infer to be the implied question, "how does my company get good product shots of large appliances with large glass doors?". When you say, the company is ok with having the equipment needed to get rid of the reflections, I assume that you are the person who is taking the product photos, and have a ...


0

One thing you could do is put some light inside, which will hide the reflection. Ideally, these would be LED strips placed on the far edges of shelves so that the will not be visible in the photo, but the light will. This will also make the sci-fi/laboratory aspect of the shelves stand out.


1

You should definitely do clean product shots - solid blank background and lighting. You can also do shots that show your product being used but you first need images that clearly show your product and show your product off. Since your product is steel and glass, you should do a black background. Any color or white will reflect off the glass and steel and ...


4

With reflective surfaces you do not remove the reflections. Instead, you give it something pleasing to reflect. That's what the white room/walls do... they provide a continuous smooth white reflection/gradient. Curved surfaces are much more difficult because they see/reflect a much larger area/radius.


37

In a reflective surface, the reflections are of the surrounding area. 1. The bigger the object the bigger space you need So, in your case, you need a really big space clean, let's say painted on white, like a photo studio. Look how humungous and clean a photo studio can be. I think you need about the space to fit two or three cars. A 90° corner could ...


16

Two basic techniques for dealing with reflections on glass should be known, albeit they will only reduce, not totally eliminate them - so for formal product photography, the advice about using an all white or black, uncluttered shooting environment still apply. One is using polarizing filters. In the simplest form, you use one on your camera lens - for more ...


10

I use for reference the first half page of hits when I search "product photographs industrial refrigerator"… You'll notice the very first thing you are going to need is a white room, or if budget is limited then some kind of framework from which you can hang white sheets or paper roll, completely surrounding the product. Once you have that, you are then in ...


Top 50 recent answers are included