11

It's hard to guess exactly what you did wrong, but one way or another there was no development at all. No matter what your camera did, you should still see exposed leader and frame numbers. Totally blank film is not the result of merely expired developer or a bit too little developing time. At 8 minutes and 86 °F, something should have been visible, ...


10

When a commercial lab develops and scans film, they feed the entire strip of film through an automated scanner before cutting and sleeving the negatives. When scanning negatives that have already been cut and sleeved, the labor needed to remove each segment from the sleeves and feed them through a commercial scanner 4 at a time instead of threading an ...


8

This is a photo of Rodney Lough Jr. from the Wilderness Collection, called "Day Dreaming". You have to select the image at the bottom of the page for more info and the high resolution version. It says: Camera: Toyo 4x5 AII Field Camera Lens: 210mm Aperture: f64 Exposure: 45 Seconds Film: Professional Fuji Velvia The softness is coming from the long ...


8

You're be looking for the Sabatier Effect. Sabatier discovered that when a plate was exposed, developed, and washed but not fixed, it could be given a second exposure to light which would partially reverse the image when development was continued. The technique can be used on film or when printing but is more commonly used when printing as the effects ...


8

RAW files do not have WB applied except for the embedded JPEG used for preview by software that do not understand those files. So, it is up to you to apply the correct WB when converting those files into images. There is no correction to apply because nothing has been set. Just to be clear, there is no WB setting which will correct all your images. Each set ...


7

Nobody can say for sure what went wrong. One would think that even an expired and contaminated developer would yield something. My bet is, you mixed up the chemicals and poured then in out of order. Anyway, it’s easy to test the developer. In room light pour some developer in a shallow bowl. It won’t hurt to do the same with the other fluids. Now take a ...


7

There's no specific technique or process going on here to the best of my knowledge - the colours are fairly muted with a slight pink tint, that's all. What you're actually seeing is a set of very carefully prepared set of images by someone with a lot of experience. There are a lot of "how do I achieve the post production of professional photographer X" ...


5

$20 is very reasonable. Consider this: Digital >> Shoot >> Cull >> Edit >> Prepare >> Deliver (takes A LOT of YOUR time depending on project size) Film >> Shoot >> Send >> Receive >> Review >> Deliver (takes few hours, if that, you go spend that time, shooting, with family or whatever) If you are looking for quality lab, then look no further than http://...


5

Another cause for the entire roll of film to be blank but with visible edge printing would be that the film was never exposed in the first place. This could be due to misalignment during film loading leading to the tapered tongue not catching onto the take-up spool and not advancing the film after each exposure was made. A tell-tale for this would be a black ...


5

Tetenal filed for bankruptcy in October 2018 and was closed down by April 1st 2019. Some of the employees have taken over the company and intend to continue production and sale under the name 'New Tetenal'. The new web shop is open for pre-orders, but they have not yet made any statements on when they are intending to deliver. C-41 developer kits for home ...


3

The specific difference between the Cinestill 2-bath developer kit and the Tetenal 3-bath developer kit is that Cinestill leaves out the final stabilizer bath, or more precisely label it as 'optional'. They claim in their data sheet that modern C41 films contain embedded stabilizer chemicals, which are released during the first two baths, so that a separate ...


3

Well I'm answering my own question as I had some more old reels of film to develop and so was able to experiment a bit - and the results might be useful to other people. All the below are colour reversal films developed as B&W, using Ilfosol 3 developer (1+9 dilution), Ilfostop (1+19 dilution) and Ilfofix (1+9 dilution). All at 20 degrees celsius. In ...


3

Would a little bit of light cause the WHOLE strip to be perfectly transparent? No, this is backwards. You are using negative film. Exposing the film to light causes it to be dark after developing. Since your film came out blank, it means either a developing failure or that too little light hit the film. There are various possible reasons why the film ...


3

To trouble shoot this issue – first examine the film paying close attention to all changes in density (blackening) and report via a good description. Next, check to see it the film has edge printing. The edges of roll film are imprinted during manufacture with frame numbers, batch number, other identification will perhaps be, barcode, makers name, type of ...


3

The first successful fixer is sodium thiosulfate. In the 60’s when ammonium thiosulfate became available it became the fixer of choice because it operated about twice as quick. Nowadays ammonium thiosulfate is the norm, however, either will work. Now color film and color paper use carefully selected organic dyes. These dyes blossom if the pH (acidity – ...


3

It's either unexposed or partially exposed. From tmtv.net's page on old movie film processing, if the roll was completely exposed, you'd see this: "EXPOSED" meaning the film has been shot and ready for processing (developing). DO NOT REMOVE OR ATTEMPT TO OPEN THE CARTRIDGE. If it does not say "exposed" it was either removed from the Super 8 camera ...


3

My guess is "single sheet", but asking them is the sure way to know what they mean. Doesn't ring a bell as a commonly used acronym in regard to (contact) prints.


3

I've accidentally exposed two 400 ASA B&W films at 200 ASA In other words, you've overexposed it by a stop. (See What is the relationship between ISO, aperture, and shutter speed? if you need a refresher on that.) The fix for this is called "pull processing" (the opposite of "push processing", which is used when you underexpose, treating the fill as one ...


2

Grey Card or Neutral Object in Shot Shoot with a gray/white card in one of your images, or select something you know to be neutral (white shirt, pavement/concrete, white wall). Most photo editors will have a white balance dropper tool. Click on the neutral area to adjust the white balance. If you then note the color temperature selected, you can sync ...


2

Marcus already answered that, I'll just use another words. You can use color fixer for black and white if it is just a fixer and not a combined bleach/fixer. Combined bleach/fixer will remove all your black and white image. Bleach fix is more common and has dark reddish color. Regular fixer is colorless. Regular B&W fixer is acidic and will fix your ...


2

Super 8 movie film remains in use. However, the film inside your cassette is Kodak Kodachrome. This is a discontinued color film that required special processing. Sorry to report that the special process is no longer available. You are strongly advised not to use this film. You might choose to keep it and put it on display or donate it to a museum. I don't ...


2

1 - Can I shoot several photos on the same roll with a different ISO setting on the camera and then see which one comes out looking the best? (Or do I have to shoot entire rolls at different ISO settings?) You can and you should shoot test shots using several different exposure settings - simply keep track of them on a notepad. Set the camera on a tripod at ...


2

Some searching seems to indicate that that particular film dates from about 1970 (apparently the "Ferrania" brand name has changed owner at least once), see e.g. here. And this thread makes me suspect it might require the E4 process for development. Note that if the film dates indeed from the 1970s (or before!), any exposition from that era might have faded ...


1

I waited to suggest this. Here's a long shot (bad idea) that you might want to try to identify the film. Before going any further, I have done this myself more than a couple of times for different reasons. The first time I did this, I learned that 120 is only fastened to the head end of the backing paper. You will have to deal with this. I know of no ...


1

This page gives the process for the Agfa 80s film, and states that the process is the one used for the (older) Agfa CN-S films. No particular name or code for this process is given, but "Agfacolor N series chemicals" is mentioned.


1

To preface; in my opinion, the two photographs are markedly different, except in subject matter. Also, everything I say here is purely subjective, as we don't have access to the exact process by which the photo was made. However; the first photo appears to be slightly oversaturated, with the contrast increased. Also, if you look around the edges of the ...


1

You actually can have this developed. My husband and I are in the same boat. We also are wondering if the cartridge is processed or unprocessed. But, there is a company called Film Rescue that can develop this. It just cannot be developed in color, only black and white.


1

Unfortunately, this is not an out-of-the-box solution, but if you have got some programming skills (mostly, the code should be there already and you just need to know how to run or compile it), you might want to look at American Gothic in the palette of Mona Lisa: Rearrange the pixels from the colleagues over at Programming Puzzles & Code Golf. Your ...


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