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1

A part of me thinks that [if we enlarged a digital image beyond a certain size] we would eventually see pixels. I'm guessing that when you say "pixels," you mean, solid-color squares. But that is not actually what "pixel" means in the field of digital image processing. If you blow up a digital image to the point where each image pixel ...


26

According to Ken Rockwell: Fuji Velvia 50 is rated to resolve 160 lines per millimeter. This is the finest level of detail it can resolve, at which point its MTF just about hits zero. Each line will require one light and one dark pixel, or two pixels. Thus it will take about 320 pixels per millimeter to represent what's on Velvia 50. 320 pixels x 320 pixels ...


3

Your 1m x 1.5m print has a resolution. If this were dpi, you could have 39.3in x 59.6in, and if that were 300 dpi, then it would be 11790px x 17880px. So, if you wanted to print at 300dpi, you basically need an image of 210,805,200 or 210 megapixels. 300dpi is the quality of most 5x7 or 8x10 photo prints. Most large prints are not 300dpi. But this gives you ...


3

Consider the size of the area to which you are projecting or printing the image to. I am going to assume you are printing. We should probably note that this may not work well if you are standing close to the wall to view it. Large images over large areas work better if you stand back a little. Additionally, the printed image will appear skewed when viewed if ...


1

To capture enough pixels to meet your needs, the best option is a mosaic. In the computer, a panoramic can be made from a row of images. A mosaic is made from multiple rows. To do this with high precision is an advanced photo technique. A special tripod head that can move the camera precisely is required. Unless you have money for the special tripod head and ...


5

I own the Canon Pro 1000. Short answer: Don't buy the printer for this scenario. Use a printing service instead. The Canon is designed to be frequently used. It uses pigmented ink which don't take long periods of not being used too well. It even shakes the cartridges before each print run. If the printer is kept plugged in, it will clean itself from time to ...


1

Use a printer with the printing heads in the ink cartridges, rather than permanent head in the printer. If/when the heads get clogged, you're only a new cartridge away from clean, new print heads. If you absolutely require the use of a pro-grade printer like the Canon imagePrograf Pro-1000 or an Epson SureColor SC-P900 for only a limited amount of printing, ...


1

I think the general guideline for ink is two years from the manufacture date. For Prograf, that may be less. There may even be an expiry date printed for some grades/brands of ink cartridges I have found the best thing to do is to print test pages and alignment pages every so often. If you are really going to be away from a printer for that long, and you are ...


2

When printing an image that has one aspect ratio on paper that has a different aspect ratio, there are two options if you don't want the image "stretched" in one direction. You either crop the image to match the aspect ratio of the paper, or you print the image "letterboxed" - I.E. With borders on one or two sides that you can trim off, ...


-1

Since you get the same results when printing directly from a flash drive, you are somewhat at the mercy of the printer hardware. You can add a border to your image to compensate. The printer may be scaling images by some percentage. If this is the case, based on the dimensions you give, the printer is increasing image sizes by 6-7%. For a 1618x1854 image, ...


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