33

According to Ken Rockwell: Fuji Velvia 50 is rated to resolve 160 lines per millimeter. This is the finest level of detail it can resolve, at which point its MTF just about hits zero. Each line will require one light and one dark pixel, or two pixels. Thus it will take about 320 pixels per millimeter to represent what's on Velvia 50. 320 pixels x 320 pixels ...


26

To absolutely prevent a print shop from stealing your photos, buy or rent a printer and print the photographs yourself. This will also require buying appropriate paper. And perhaps color calibration for the paper and printer, although using the printer manufacturer’s branded paper often gives pretty good results without calibration.


25

Use a reputable shop. A shop with a good reputation, that wishes to keep that reputation (and therefore its customers), will be motivated to behave honestly. If the trust is broken for some reason, then we have courts to restitute the victim, and possibly impose punitive damages. A court case is very bad for a business's credibility.


15

First off, I suspect that you are being influenced by Dunning-Kruger fallacy to even think about such a scenario of your photos being stolen. I am sorry to crush your expectations, but let's get back down to Earth and be realistic: if you think that around 1.5 years one could get from a complete beginner to someone so good that their photos are "worth&...


14

Interesting question. Please google "ISO test charts", or "test charts targets" To my knowledge that one is ISO-12233 "Digital Resolution Still Camera Test Chart". It is a bit expensive though, so you can find some other camera test chart options on Amazon, or perhaps find some second-hand on eBay. But as you want to use them in ...


8

See here. Of course it has to be printed correctly to be of any value.


7

Even a small photo lab processes thousands of photos from different people daily. Aside from a quick quality check, they don't even look at a majority of the photos. All sorts of photos pass by them, and they typically have little interest in stealing customers' photos. Many photos are even thrown away because customers don't bother to pick them up, far ...


5

I own the Canon Pro 1000. Short answer: Don't buy the printer for this scenario. Use a printing service instead. The Canon is designed to be frequently used. It uses pigmented ink which don't take long periods of not being used too well. It even shakes the cartridges before each print run. If the printer is kept plugged in, it will clean itself from time to ...


5

"Quality" is a loose term. Was your film a 6x7 that you wanted to turn into a 40"x60" gallery print that was simply scanned for backup? 'Cause if so, I got bad news for you. Or, was this a 135 shot destined for a 4"x6" to hang on the fridge that got scanned at a ridiculously high resolution for...reasons...? Maybe it was a 135 ...


5

Your 1m x 1.5m print has a resolution. If this were dpi, you could have 39.3in x 59.6in, and if that were 300 dpi, then it would be 11790px x 17880px. So, if you wanted to print at 300dpi, you basically need an image of 210,805,200 or 210 megapixels. 300dpi is the quality of most 5x7 or 8x10 photo prints. Most large prints are not 300dpi. But this gives you ...


5

Another option - don't print them at all. Instead, keep them entirely digital, using a monitor to view or display the photos. There used to be "digital photo frames" which would cycle though a set of images which may fill the purpose.


4

You could embed a digital watermark. That way, if the images get stolen and used on the internet, you could prove their provenance. I've never done it myself, so I don't speak from experience. Since you own the copyright on your images, you could then sue the shop. You could even tell the print shop such a watermark is present to persuade them to not steal ...


3

By 1920 the photofinishing industry was well established. These firms were advertising film developing and printing services, including enlarging. Camera stores were common, and photofinishing was one of their offerings which also included printing and enlarging. Additionally, photographers worked out of a shop that typically did their own film developing, ...


3

Rather than printing the photo on paper the full size of the frame, you'll probably prefer the results, along with the significantly lower cost of the print, if you cut a matte for the border and only print the photo large enough to fill the hole in the center of the matte. The cost of the matte will be minor compared to the savings gained by not paying for ...


3

Is it possible to achieve the same degree of quality in printing on paper from the digitalized version, as if it were from the negatives? The quality of prints you can obtain with the digital file you possess depends on the properties of the file and image, including resolution, sharpness, and color fidelity. Modern labs use digital intermediates to create ...


3

Consider the size of the area to which you are projecting or printing the image to. I am going to assume you are printing. We should probably note that this may not work well if you are standing close to the wall to view it. Large images over large areas work better if you stand back a little. Additionally, the printed image will appear skewed when viewed if ...


3

My profession revolved around the printing machines you are asking about. I was technical manager for 7 giant photofinishing plants in the Southeastern United states. Each plant was sized to handle, on a daily basis the peak volume generated by the holiday season. My labs were sized to develop and print 20,000 rolls of color film a day. I worked for Eckerd ...


2

Prior to the introduction of scanning on the mass consumer level (late 1990s), all prints were made optically. By the time C-41 was mature (early 1980s), RA-4 was the standard for print chemistry -- the same process that's still used for both projection printing and laser prints in color. The general operation was that negatives were processed in machines ...


2

This might be coming in a little late but what i do is 2 things first i spray paint very thin a matte clear then i take white school glue and add a thin layer of that. Let it dry and press it flat if needed. The spray paint is used to keep the paper from cockling when the glue is added mostly so you can leave that out if needed. Thinning out the glue with a ...


2

Use a printer with the printing heads in the ink cartridges, rather than permanent head in the printer. If/when the heads get clogged, you're only a new cartridge away from clean, new print heads. If you absolutely require the use of a pro-grade printer like the Canon imagePrograf Pro-1000 or an Epson SureColor SC-P900 for only a limited amount of printing, ...


2

I think the general guideline for ink is two years from the manufacture date. For Prograf, that may be less. There may even be an expiry date printed for some grades/brands of ink cartridges I have found the best thing to do is to print test pages and alignment pages every so often. If you are really going to be away from a printer for that long, and you are ...


2

When printing an image that has one aspect ratio on paper that has a different aspect ratio, there are two options if you don't want the image "stretched" in one direction. You either crop the image to match the aspect ratio of the paper, or you print the image "letterboxed" - I.E. With borders on one or two sides that you can trim off, ...


2

The other answers are excellent and give a great explanation of the mechanics of film -> printing pixel resolution. I wanted to highlight a particular (35mm) contemporary (black and white) film, which has very high resolution (800 line pairs/mm): Adox CMS II 20 From their materials: Adox CMS II ISO 20 is the one of the sharpest, most fine grain films ...


2

Short answer: if your film lab is careless enough to have destroyed your negative(s) after scanning, their scans might well be junk, too. However, if you have the file, you'll be able to judge for yourself. In general, to make an 8x10 optical print that doesn't look pixelated, you'll need a couple megapixels -- which is usually less than common lab scans, ...


2

It's like with code, scientific papers or with anything precious. Either it's so bad or common it's not worth stealing or it'll be stolen - eventually. Physical security won't help because of always having a larger force (up to war weapons) to break the defence. Psychological security, e.g. by keeping it in your head or obscuring it (secret/password/...) won'...


1

You have your causality backwards. RGB doesn't work because they're opposing colors on the wheel, the wheel is organized as it is because the eyes work in RGB. The way we see colors is an additive process. You can create (almost1) any hue by adding different quantities of red, green, and blue light. There are no other colors of light that have that ...


1

The world saw the first color image by photography in 1861 when James Clark Maxwell demonstrated his three-color additive method to the Royal Society. Gavriel Lippmann got the Nobel Prize for his no-filter no-dye color interference process 1908. The first commercial color film, Autochrome was marketed in 1903, using red, green, blue dyed microscopic flakes ...


1

At the time of taking the images you would want to use a combination of RGB filters; e.g. R+G rejection filters (or a blue colored absorptive type filter) allowing B to pass. Then at the time of enlargement/printing you would need to use the corresponding RGB filter for that image; e.g. B for the R+G filtered negative... this is all additive color because it ...


1

The industry standard method would use two transforms encoded as ICC profiles. The input device would use an mapping from its color characteristics to the Profile Connection Space. Likewise the output would use a mapping from the Profile Connection Space to its output color space. This is the standard because it allowed for connecting any input device to any ...


1

My guess is the problem was operator error at the print shop. Specifically, the operator was right clicking on a thumbnail and downloading that instead of the linked image. It probably started working automatically when a different person at the print shop downloaded the image. My working premise is that print shops often use less experienced operators for ...


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