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Your camera has a 1.6x crop factor. On APS-C, 50mm gives you the field of view of a classic portrait lens on full frame (80mm). While 35mm will give you the FOV of a "normal" lens (56mm). If you want the lens mainly for portraits, go for the 50/1.4. If you're on a budget, consider 50/1.8. If you want the lens for general photography, get the 35/2. You might ...


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You've already identified some of the most striking and significant differences: Size/weight Price Not so obvious is that the Nikkor AF-S 50mm f/1.4G is a 2008 design with nine optical elements in six groups based on far older previous lenses¹ while the Sigma 50/1.4 ART is a 2014 design with thirteen optical elements in eight groups. Nikon's more recent ...


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Short answer Bright, sharp primes, when paired with high-resolution sensors, can be a viable alternative to slower, variable aperture zoom lenses and enable effective zooming. Constant aperture lenses, if you can afford the price and bulk, are the better choice. The exact impact on resolution and light capture will depend on the exact lenses being compared. ...


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For Nikon F-mount lenses with mechanical aperture control, you can use the Nikon BR-6 Auto Diaphragm Ring. For Canon EF lenses, which have electronic only camera/lens communication, you can use an "Automatic" Macro reverse mount adapter. There are also other "DIY" ways to set the aperture to a desired setting. For Nikon F-mount lenses they usually involve ...


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Here is a side by side comparison of detail (A is on the left and B is on the right): Image A certainly seems to have greater contrast and dynamic range compared to B, which appears to be more washed out and have less detail. In B the difference between the brighter areas and darker areas is less than in A. So, based on that, I would guess A is the prime. ...


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Here is a review and measurement of the Nikon 50mm f/1.4G: https://www.lenstip.com/162.4-Lens_review-Nikon_Nikkor_AF-S_50_mm_f_1.4G_Image_resolution.html As you see, the maximum resolution at any aperture is about 42 lp/mm at the center and 33 lp/mm at the edge at the same aperture. Here is a review and test of the Sigma 50 mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art: https://www....


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The answer is, not surprisingly, "it depends on the lenses being compared." You are correct that cropping results in a loss of light. In fact, it is the FL cropping (increased magnification) that causes a zoom lens to have a "variable aperture." In reality the aperture diameter remains the same size; so the f# changes relative to the change in FL (crop/...


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Thank you for the help. These past few days I had tested both 50mmf1.4 and 35mmf2.. and at the end I decided to stick with 35mmf2. The reasons are as follows: The 50mm is really soft at f1.4 and starts to give sharp performance from f2.5. From f2.8 it is really sharp. The 35mm is really sharp from f2. If I buy a lens I would like to use it from the widest ...


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The Tamron SP 45mm F/1.8 Di VC USD is the exception to the rule: https://www.tamron.eu/lenses/sp-45mm-f18-di-vc-usd/ I own it and use it on the EOS 6D, it is a very fine lens with image stabilization and weather proofing too.


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A reason to select a prime lens, is that for the money, one normally gets a bigger aperture, which lets in more light, or has a more limited depth of field. A second reason prime lenses are used is that for the cost, mass and size they product better image quality with mid-apertures. More light is helpful in limited lighting, like in a church, where flash ...


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