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13

Why don't cameras show a histogram based on the RAW data rather than on the JPG preview? My notion is this: Because it would not be useful, because raw images don't yet have white balance in them, but the JPG images do have WB. For example, Daylight white balance will shift the red channel substantially higher, and the blue channel substantially lower. ...


7

I just discovered a way to do this. I'm using RawTherapee 4.2, but from your screenshot, I think this feature is in the version you used, too. It's in the toolbar just to the top right of the image. From my system: The blue, green, red, and gray squares let you preview individual color or luminosity channels — they're toggles you can click on. To the left ...


7

When you take a photo with a digital camera, The camera collects the raw data from the image sensor, processes it, and creates a JPEG preview image. This preview image is attached to the main image file, whether the main file is in a raw image file format or is a JPEG file converted from the raw data according to the camera settings current when the image ...


5

Picture Profiles do not affect RAW data itself. Except that the EVF and LCD do not show RAW data, they cannot, since that data needs to be interpolated in order to produce an image. They must show an image, so they use the settings you choose in the Picture Profile to generate what is shown. The camera also uses the same settings to generate an embedded ...


5

You can get this for free with XnView: I have now written an easy tutorial to configure everything properly: http://ubuntuswitch.wordpress.com/2013/10/30/delete-jpg-and-raw-files-simultaneously-on-windows/ Works like a charm :-) Edit for Paul Cezanne: I do not have any plans to take the blog down, as I use it as reference for such problems, but here is ...


5

I think you should be able to do it using "exiftool" --- I tested on a Linux PC, via commandline, and with a Sony ARW image, so your mileage may vary --- I have no DNG to test with. The command is basically: exiftool '-previewImage<=myown.jpg' test.arw (the quotes are needed in Unix to prevent the shell interpretation of <=). I have a bit of ...


5

The MacOS X feature that's responsible for showing you previews in Finder, Spotlight, standard file dialogs, etc., is called QuickLook. QuickLook needs an importer for each type of file that you'd like to preview. For standard types like text files, JPEG and PNG images, sounds, and others, the system has built-in QuickLook importers. In other cases, ...


5

The image in the preview comes from an embedded JPEG inside the raw file which was generated by the camera, while the image you see when you open the raw file in Lightroom is generated by Lightroom based on the raw data itself. The raw image data is captured from the camera at a point before the contrast and color settings are applied by the camera, so any ...


4

Most RAW files include a thumbnail for easy preview without having to process the image. It is not full resolution and is heavily compressed, so you don't need to really worry about the space consumption. Without it, nothing that doesn't know how to process RAW files would be able to show what the file contains. Ultimately, it is up to the camera if it ...


4

In general, it's a safe bet that this information is stored in the RAW file itself. With Canon, the preview is 1/4 the size of the original and a fairly heavily compressed JPEG, so I wouldn't worry about size.


4

You are correct. The D5100 does not have a Depth-of-field preview functionality. If you take a look at the list of Nikon DSLRs, the one with the icons in the shape of an iris have that feature. The D7000 just below the D5100 on the list has it. Typically, this function does not make it into entry-level cameras. The best you can do it take a test shot and ...


4

Where you get the "File contains no Image data" after viewing files on your PC is generally down to various viewer and edit programs ADDING information to the original file. A simple test to see if it is the SD card that is corrupted is to put it into your PC and see if you can read all the files. If you can then the SD card if fine. Microsoft Photo Viewer ...


4

Two possibilities that I can think of. If you are shooting RAW, then you may need to download the Microsoft Camera Codec Pack for Windows 7 which will allow Windows to create thumbnail images as previews You may simply need to change a folder view setting: Open Windows Explorer Click on Organize >Folder and Search options On the "View" tab, uncheck the "...


3

If you look in the "Tools Menu" you'll see there's an "Adjust Size…" option. This does not do what you want, but it turns out you can use it to get what you need. You can do the following: Open your image and choose "Select All" (Cmd-A) from the "Edit" menu Choose "Copy" (Cmd-C) from the "Edit" menu Choose "New from Clipboard" (Cmd-N) from the "File" menu ...


3

http://www.irfanview.com/ Options - Properties/Settings - File Handling - Delete - For Experts: delete "sidecar files" Check the box and enter your camera's raw file extension and JPG, like so - CR2|JPG| Or in your case NEF|JPG| Works for me. great photo viewer and the price is right!


3

In Sony cameras Picture Profiles there's only one setting that affects RAW files - the GAMMA. Some Gamma values limit your minimum ISO (especially some gammas for video). But for stills for example a gamma "STILL" allows you the extended min. range 50~100, but "ITU709" gives you only the native min. 100 ISO but gives you brighter image. I still have to make ...


3

You can't view histogram via viewfinder, this is DSLR and you see via lens. In live view mode you can press Info button several times and on one of the views you will see histogram.


3

You probably use a small aperture. When autofocus does its work, it usually does it with wide open aperture. That's why you get a brighter image for a small time. It says nothing about the brightness of the final image. This may be different when using phased-based autofocus and contrast-based autofocus, but this depends on what the camera does. Some ...


2

The main reason Lightroom's generated preview is so different from the embedded one is because it's generating the preview with the Adobe Standard camera calibration by default, whereas the embedded one was generated using the Picture Control setting you have in the camera. To make Lightroom's previews closer to Nikon's, what you can do is: Create a ...


2

Now (version 5.8), you can tick "Automatically zoom to fit the crop" option in the tab Preferences>Image Processing>Crop Editing


2

In windows task manager, you can lower the priority class of the Lightroom process. That will help other processes to get some more CPU time, and quite frankly i think Adobe should have implemented those long running tasks with idle priority anyway, so working interactively could continue as normal. You also can fiddle with CPU affinity of the Lightroom ...


2

When reviewing photos on your camera's LCD screen be aware that it will lie like a politician! On the camera's smaller, lower resolution screen depth of field will appear much deeper than it will when viewed at full size and resolution on your laptop. Preview images displayed on your camera's LCD screen are also sharpened and usually have a bit (or more) of ...


2

Just a guess, but I'd assume camera companies use the JPEG preview for the viewfinder rather than the full RAW data because they probably feel you'd prefer having instant/live feedback when viewing images, rather than waiting for the camera's ARM-based processor to chew through the full 24MB to 50MB images' worth of data in the RAW files to come up with ...


2

PP is never applied to your RAWs, but will be applied to JPEGs (in RAW+JPEG, Fine, Std modes) and RAW previews (what you see while previewing in camera). Why it affects your viewfinder? The way I use this feature is shooting with BW profile. Rather than eliminating color information in your head this option shows me the final shot right away.


2

I guess you mean that pictures show up for only few seconds on your camera's LCD after you snapped them. First of all, you can view images for a very long time by pressing "Playback" button and scroll through images by using cross key (the one with left-right/up-down buttons). Also, you can set how long the image is displayed on the LCD monitor immediately ...


2

This is a feature, not a bug. By itself, a RAW file has no interpretation and there would be nothing to preview. Some kind of Picture Profile (or whatever different brands and software call it) needs to be applied for you to meaningfully see what you're going to get. If you pick settings close to your final intention, it's easier to compose in the field. ...


2

My understanding is that the preview image is the embedded JPEG within the NEF file. Therefore, my guess is that you're initially seeing the JPEG and then the unedited NEF file.


1

My question is how can you see from the digital screen of camera ,the preview of image in RAW format? The camera creates interprets the RAW data into a viewable image for display purposes, so you can see it just fine on the camera's display. It also embeds a JPEG preview of the image in the RAW file, so that you have some way to tell which RAW file is which ...


1

To regenerate the embedded DNG preview for an image, right-click on the image, choose Metadata, then choose Update DNG Preview & Metadata. I use this process to ensure that the thumbnails that Windows Explorer displays for DNGs reflects the changes I have made to the image in LR, so I believe it should do what you want. If you want to do this for ...


1

why don't you download some other good software? http://x.photoscape.org/mac/ - Photoscape is a good and handy software which helps in quick photo edits, resize, crop, etc. You don't have to go for conventional crude preview software.


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