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7

Check the Apply During Import pane's settings in the Import window (if you have the window minimized, expand to the full window with all the settings). Lightroom can automatically apply a preset upon import, and it sounds like that's what's happening to you. You may have accidentally got it set to something that's causing the weird processing. You also ...


7

If you open the plugin file in a text editor, you can see all the settings associated with the preset. In the case of this one, I can find the following: VignetteAmount = -100, VignetteMidpoint = 0, Which suggests that it's not using 'post-crop vignette' but the lens correction vignette instead. You could verify this by applying the preset, and checking ...


5

On the export dialog, set your image sizing (I set mine as you requested). Then click the add button in the bottom left hand corner of the dialog. Set its name And you are all set.


4

Let me explain how to accomplish this, then once you know that, you can do it and save the preset. First, take a subject similar to one you might use. Here is a baby image that looks good for a pastel treatment: Note that the contrast and tonality are pretty good and that the detail is good throughout. Now, in the Lightroom Develop Module, slide the fill ...


4

The default settings are so called because they are what the designers of the camera selected to be the standard settings for your camera. Short of writing your own firmware revision for the camera there is no way for you to alter a default setting and then have the camera return to that setting when you do a default reset.


4

There is nice third-party add-on from Google called Nik. It was paid but they released it free. It cooperates nicely with Photoshop and Lightroom. Black and White: https://www.google.com/nikcollection/products/silver-efex-pro/ Color: https://www.google.com/nikcollection/products/color-efex-pro/ There are several film presets as well as possibility to do ...


4

If you're not afraid of command line, it's explained on https://redmine.darktable.org/projects/users/wiki/Manual_exportimport_of_styles_presets_and_masks The core of it is: Export from old context sqlite3 ~/.config/darktable/library.db .output presets.backup .dump presets .output styles.backup .dump styles .output style_items.backup .dump style_items ....


3

Let me see if I can put this to bed, though it is not a terribly satisfactory answer. A Lightroom preset is a collection of settings, so once applied, the preset itself is not needed (by lightroom) to render the image. That is in contrast to something like a camera profile - the profile is used each time the image is rendered, so if you have a custom ...


3

In the Incandescent menu, just adjust the dot back to the 0,0 center position of the colored grid.


3

No. There is currently no such standard. The closest thing is Lightroom sidecar XMP files as a defacto standard. These aren't exactly human-readable (because they're XML rather than the simple key-value format you propose), but at least they're text. And they're not standardized, but some other programs (like Darktable) can at least attempt to interpret them....


3

Apply the preset to an image Modify the setting you would like changed in the preset Click the "+" sign under the presets window to create a new preset, or right click an existing preset and click "Update with current settings" If it is adding vignetting I would look at the Lens Corrections Develop module, as well as the Effects Develop module.


3

First a brief explanation... A picture style/profile is simply a recipe; it is a means of interpreting the raw data of the sensor. It dictates the tone, contrast, sharpness, brightness, and other ways of interpreting the raw data. When shooting jpeg then these recipes are used in the conversion of the raw to jpeg in camera. So to answer your questions... ...


3

From the website help it looks like these match my first guess: names of camera makers. C = Canon F = Fujifilm L = Leica N = Nikon O = Olympus S = Sony ... and are you sure that last SO isn't SC for "Standard Cameras"?


2

Best bet is to download some LR presets, try them out and see how close they get you. You probably are going to want to reduce saturation, and it looks like remove some green and or blue. From there you can adjust things. My two favorite places for good presets are: onOne Software free preset pack: http://www.ononesoftware.com/products/perfect-presets-...


2

You're right. The picture style only affects JPEG development. The main exception is detailed here — cameras usually use these settings for review (which may affect the exposure decisions you make) and for metering (which may affect the exposure decisions the camera makes). Some RAW converters may use it to set defaults; others will ignore it. Many viewers ...


2

FYI, this article from Adobe documents the file location of these presets: Installed and custom presets and templates have filenames ending in .lrtemplate and are located in folders under the Users/[user name]/AppData/Roaming/Adobe/Lightroom folder. Another link (for LR4, but I presume this also holds true for LR3) confirms that "factory" or built-in ...


2

There is a solution provided by Jeffrey Friedl and his awesome Lightroom plugin "Data Explorer". download and install the plugin select all the images, which have different canon styles applied, you want to process. the free version of the plugin is limited to handling a maximum of 500 images at once. Edit > Select all run the data explorer. File > Plug-in ...


2

Lightroom shows you a JPG (the same one you see on your camera back) the first moment you import your photo. Then you see the Raw ones.


2

If you're on a Mac, and there is a menu-item for what you are willing to do, you can assign keyboard-shortcuts to these menu-items. These are the instruction: http://support.apple.com/kb/PH3957


2

I think the answer is no. You can change the starting number when you export, but it still assumes you're exporting a contiguous sequence of images. In your case, I get the feeling you might export the 5th, 7th and 10th to 15th images, in which case, even if you pick 5 as the starting number you'll get 5, 6, 7, .... I don't think 'position in a collection'...


2

One of darktable's little quirks is that it stores module presets in the library database, the same one that is otherwise primarily used for storing data about the image files and how they've been processed. A few users have complained about this on the mailing list, but AFAIK it's still working this way in 2.x versions. This makes it difficult to backup and ...


2

You should also check the "Apply auto tone adjustments" checkbox on the Presets tab of the Preferences dialog that may be in play here. If that is checked, I don't think you get the option to reset the images in the Develop module afterwards. My preference personally is to leave the checkbox unchecked and then choose to apply the Auto-Tone Develop preset in ...


2

It's entirely a product of Contrast through the use of Curves (or Levels). Raise your black point in the curve (RGB curve). Then lower the white point in the curve (RGB curve): Then change to one of the individual channel curves and alter the black point slightly to put color into the shadow. For example your second image has a Yellow tint on the ...


2

I would suggest you use the Lightroom split toning tool. Hold down the alt key to see the area of effect. https://photographylife.com/how-to-split-tone-photos-in-lightroom


2

There's no way I know of to apply a preset with it not re-zeroing the adjustments, as they are all based off of a zero setting. However there is an easier way to do what you are doing without leaving lightroom. Create an Export Preset with the following settings: Export Location: Export To: Same folder as original photo Check "Add to This Catalog" Set "...


2

Well, a literal answer would be that you could use darktable's embedded Lua scripting to apply a style to each image after import, possibly first checking the image information for camera model... However, a more typical method would be to create auto-applied presets in each of the modules that you want to enable/disable. If you hover over the name of a ...


2

A lot has to do with how the "presets" are written and at what stage in the imaging processing pipeline they act upon the image. There can be a wide variation from one "preset" to the next. "Presets" are merely someone else's list of settings applied in a certain order determined by them when they recorded the preset. "Presets" usually assume that the ...


1

Using a lens profile corrects very little distortion. for example perspective distortion stays in the picture. I think you want the profile to detect the lens used but keep the distortion and correct the vignetting. In Lens Correction, Profile tab > Enable Profile corrections but adjust the Distortion setting to zero. Click on the Manual tab and set ...


1

The problem is that the tools don't function the same way, and there isn't a 1-to-1 mapping of LR tools to darktable tools. Your converter could approximate the settings from LR modules, but I don't think you'll ever get 1-to-1 conversion.


1

Any of those sliders being at non-zero directly after importing indeed indicates that you may be (accidentally) applying a development preset to your photos. That is issue one. Should you solve that one, there is issue two. As you open a photo after import, the preview will first look as intended, meaning exactly the same as you saw on your camera's LCD. ...


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