55

Certainly the biggest factor is the dynamic range processing. The room is so bright, and shares the same color temperature as the outdoors daylight lighting. Yet the shadows in the balcony and near the glass door, which are closer to the light source, are the darkest parts of the scene. Also, one "fakeness" indicator that your mind might not have caught, ...


44

Going from negative film to a printed image is a two-step process. First, the negative is developed — the latent image on the film brought out and then fixed in place. Now you have a piece of translucent film with a negative image on it. Second, to go to a the final print on paper, you then essentially repeat the process, shining light through the negative ...


25

The thing that sets off the alarm is the perfectly bright and uniform lighting in the room, especially on its ceiling. The room should be quite dark, since the sun is on the other side of the building (according to the building in the background). You can see through the window (and in the big mirror) that the ceiling of the balcony is more realistically in ...


24

I'd guess it's as simple as selecting the subject in Photoshop - with a tad more care & attention than I've used below, then leeching out the saturation in the background & tonally balancing towards a sepia effect. As a very quick demo I did the same thing but made it a pretty garish purple instead. Once you have your mask you can treat inside &...


21

The focus seems too even to me.  I would expect a photo taken to have something blurrier, either in the foreground or background.


18

I thought an illustration would be helpful. It's the same principle as an overhead projector, another mostly obsolete piece of technology: Where instead of textbook text on a transparency, the source image is a film negative, which is also transparency. The screen in the image would in turn be another paper film, which is developed in the regular process....


12

The phenomenon you're describing is called parallax. I've heard the technique called either "Parallax Removal" or the "X-Ray Brush." Taking 2 or more pictures of an object in one plane by moving the camera in a second, parallel plane. Objects not on the target plane will "move" relative to the target plane as a result. You can do layer them into a "clean" ...


11

When an image contains pure white (#fff or values RGB 255/255/255) - we refer to this as "blown" or "blown out". There is nothing you can do to alter these pixels to gain lost detail. For example, I've cranked the levels to darken everything, yet here those pixels are...in all their blown glory: Keeping that in mind, the only thing that you can do is ...


8

You're never going to get it back to 'good' because your subjects are backlit and you have a massive flare into the lens from the sun itself, right in-frame, which is causing the haze. You could pull some detail into it, but at quite a cost to noise levels & colour tones. This is a quick & dirty attempt just using Photoshop's Camera RAW filter. ...


8

Another approach, since as Hueco mentions in his answer, this detail is blown out and unrecoverable - is we can try to reduce it's impact by attempting to darken some of the blurred "halo" effects that surround the bright reflections. The process here is not too dissimilar to manually performing an unsharp mask. I'm going to focus on this one section, as it'...


7

That's because you inadvertently selected the "Perspective Clone" tool instead of "Perspective".


6

In general: no rights at all. Somebody posting something on the web doesn't give you a right to edit it. Typical retouching isn't going to count as creating something "materially new" - it would be obvious to a typical person that it's the same photo just tweaked a bit. However, in this particular case the rules of the subreddit say All RAW files in ...


6

Visible color of an object looks like something objective — if it looks yellow then it looks yellow, why change it in the first place? I just don't see how this color alteration is useful. This is the fundamental misunderstanding. Visible color is not objective at all. That sounds surprising if you haven't really stopped to consider or investigate, but it ...


6

Straight away I should mention that lunar photography is different that astrophotography of deep-sky objects. The types of frames you are describing (calibration frames) are extremely helpful for deep-sky objects but not as useful for lunar photography. You probably wont need to worry too much about noise in lunar photography because you can take those ...


5

On fair days the world is illuminated by a combination of sunlight and skylight. On overcast days, the world is illuminated by skylight only. Now skylight is very blue thus images reproduce with a blueish tint. If you were using color slide film, the remedy is to mount a warming filter. The most popular is the Wratten 1A (Kodak trade name) commonly called a “...


5

How certain are you that your client requires a 9000x6000 image (30"x20" at 300dpi)? You should strongly consider discussing your clients' actual needs with them. What they will be using the image for, etc? If your camera does not natively produce such large files, increasing image sizes before editing will mainly just slow down your editing workflow. If ...


5

What you seem to be after is a metering mode that places the highest priority on not blowing the highlights. This is important for many photographers and many lighting situations. But there are also other times when getting the shadows or the midtones properly exposed is more important to the photographer. At those points where the dynamic range of the scene ...


5

Others have covered rather well your very limited post processing options. Of course the best way is to shoot the image with the proper exposure to begin with. While this doesn't really answer the question directly, it is far too long for a comment. The following does respond to a comment by the OP to another answer. Thanks! I've learned a whole lot, ...


5

Didn't the photographer use flash? A common practice to make subjects "stand out" is to use flash for proper subject exposure, and to use camera settings to slightly underexposure the background. That is my guess here, instead of post processing.


5

Normal enlarging processes are kind of a reversal of taking a photo. In a camera you gather light from a 'large area' in front of the camera, and focus it down onto a small area of film or digital sensor to collect the light. And in regular film photography that will capture an inverse image. Film is made with a clear or at least very transparent base so ...


5

As far as sorting files by time, but not date, I know of no file or image manager that has such a feature. However, it is possible to move or rename files into folders based on your desired parameters. The "standard" tool for processing files based on Exif data is exiftool. Normally, I would move files into folders based on the date images were taken: ...


4

Looking at this photographers’ other images, it is clear that she is initially positioning her subjects where she is able to take full advantage of the composition with the help of wide apertures and shallow depth of field on her 85mm f/1.8 lens with a full frame sensor to create the effect. She also very clearly ensures that she only clicks in soft light; ...


4

I'm not a lawyer; if this extends beyond idle curiosity, go see one. ... have I created something materially 'new' to which I now can claim my own (limited?) copyright? You've created what's called a derivative work, which means you've used a substantial part of an existing work as the basis for creating something different. The changes -- and only the ...


4

Spot on color balance is achieved by photographing a grey card or grey/white/black card or, if you want to get fancy, a color checker passport. Use these as the baseline points in post processing to set your white bal for all the shots taken in the same lighting. (Or, one can usually set custom white bal in camera. Dealer’s choice) Because your target ...


4

There area few ways of making such photographs. You could, for instance, use a large aperture to create a shallow depth of field whereby you blur out the background. The human eye doesn't like to look at things that out of focus. By creating a shallow DOF, you will put visual emphasis on your subject. Another way is by creating contrast between your ...


4

There may have been CRI issues. The lights are slightly yellowish, so have a relative deficit of blue. Since the hat is already dark, it doesn't reflect as much blue as you would have liked. Your white balance may also have been off just enough to affect the appearance of the hat. Objects reflect and absorb light, so the lighting in the scene isn't quite ...


3

If you have Photoshop, you can try Match Color tool. simplified instructions: open source image open target image (in target image) Image > Adjustments > Match Color In Image Statistics > Source section select your reference (source) image (from step 1) Fiddle with sliders/check-boxes until you are satisfied. Try to match compositions/scenes between ...


3

Assessment based on photos found by @shoover. The exteriors match reality (Google aerial view at least). However some trickery is going on there. In another comment I mentioned long (or multiple) exposures to account for massive depth of field to maintain focus. Looking at images 1/35 and 6/35 from the set in the link it is possible to see ghost ...


3

Keep the saturation subtle. Adding too much color to a black and white image draws too much attention away from the actual image. The color should not draw attention to itself. Contrasting colors generally look nice together. A common trick is using complimentary colors which are 180 degrees from each other on the color wheel. The way to achieve this ...


3

As all three links from the dcraw FAQ no longer work I would recommend this: https://raw.pixls.us/


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