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7

Not in the darkroom, but at the retouching (spotting) table. If you're working with large format film, you can paint them out on the negative. But that's risky. Most of the time you retouch the print. I never did any of it myself, but in college there were artists who would advertise their services in the photography department. I saw some of them in ...


3

When not using chroma subsampling, JPEG generational losses are pretty much limited to rounding error as long as the same compression settings are used. (Majority of compression losses occur during the first compression.) Here is what happens when an image is recompressed until convergence at q=90 without chroma subsampling (original, 1, n, difference): ...


2

You describe cropping to 16:9 for HDTV, and then cropping that again later to another shape for printing. That costs a lot of pixels, and discards picture area too. I suggest always archiving your original image size, for maximum results in any future event. Then crop one version to 16:9, resampled smaller to 1920x1080 pixels for HDTV (only about 2 ...


1

For what it's worth, here are tracking issues for popular open source raw converters: Darktable: https://github.com/darktable-org/darktable/issues/2170 Darktable's low-level "rawspeed" library: https://github.com/darktable-org/rawspeed/issues/121 Rawtherapee: https://github.com/Beep6581/RawTherapee/issues/5319 Libraw (another low-level library): current git ...


1

The latest versions of DxO PhotoLab support CR3 files from the EOS R, EOS RP, Rebel SL3/250D, EOS M50, Powershot G7X Mark III, and Powershot G5X Mark II. Support for CR3 files from the 90D, M6 Mark II, and M200 will be included in updates scheduled to be released by DxO Labs in December, 2019. The latest versions of Adobe products that use ACR (LR, PS, ...


1

Yuck. Likely faster to get a better scanner. Try this: Use an image of an 18% grey card. This will give you a non-saturated grey to work with. When you're shooting the greycard, make a range of exposures. In Gimp take your image, ups the range to 16 bit, divides it by the grey image chosen, then downsamples back to whatever format you choose for ...


1

Assuming that what you get without a negative is a mostly white field with even whiter corners, you can try to use that by adding it as layer in Gimp and setting it to "Divide" mode.


1

This picture, in addition to what was said, appears to take advantage of several properties of the scene and equipment: -There was a very wide angle lens used, from very close. The distortion and small size of the pole pig transformer gives it away. Wide angle lenses tend to make sky look more brilliant, whyever they do (probably by making the clouds look ...


1

Use a camera with a wide native dynamic range. This usually means a full frame camera. Although the same techniques can be used with smaller sensors, the results from single exposures will not allow as wide a difference between the highlights and the shadows. Expose for the highlights. Set exposure so that the highlights are right on the verge of clipping ...


1

This look is primarily the result of lifting the black point of the tone curve and the application of an orange-teal slpit toning. As for shooting the image itself, a shallow depth of field such as f/1.8 and diffused light was used.


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