57

Basically you want to simulate the shallow depth of field you would get when photographing small objects. This can be done either with lens with tilt function (i.e. special purpose lens called either a tilt-shift or perspective control lens) or by selectively blurring an image in post. It's not hard to do, but there is something you need to ensure in the ...


55

Certainly the biggest factor is the dynamic range processing. The room is so bright, and shares the same color temperature as the outdoors daylight lighting. Yet the shadows in the balcony and near the glass door, which are closer to the light source, are the darkest parts of the scene. Also, one "fakeness" indicator that your mind might not have caught, ...


44

The vast majority of night sky photos have been boosted in post to achieve their brightness. This is more true for cameras with smaller sensors than for cameras with larger sensors, but in general, even if you shoot the night sky at ISO 3200, you are going to need to boost exposure to get one of those nice, bright single-frame Milky Way shots. There are a ...


44

Going from negative film to a printed image is a two-step process. First, the negative is developed — the latent image on the film brought out and then fixed in place. Now you have a piece of translucent film with a negative image on it. Second, to go to a the final print on paper, you then essentially repeat the process, shining light through the negative ...


32

To achieve what you're thinking of you would have to know what the noise was. If you knew what the noise was then you could just remove that to get clean images.


31

A photographer that claims an image is complete after taking the picture, is like a doctor saying you are healed after diagnosing your illness - it requires treatment. Use the example of film. Back in the day you used to select your film stock, chemicals, chemical process, paper stock, cropping, and printing methods. These all had huge effects on the ...


29

This is one of the benefits you get from shooting raw. You can't recover highlight or shadow detail from a JPEG because it has 8 bits of color depth per color component,1 and it's mapped so that the lowest pixel value is interpreted as "black," and the highest is "white." There simply is nothing below black or above white. The creators of JPEG did this ...


29

You've got the sun almost in the frame. This is causing huge amounts of veiling flare — light bouncing all around, reducing contrast. You'll get better results from a different angle, or at a different time of day. Did you have a lens hood? If so, positioning the camera so the hood can better do its job would help. And, yeah, it probably isn't doing you any ...


27

No. If you shoot in RAW, there is nothing lost. In fact, in RAW, the white balance you set in-camera is nothing but advisory information to the post-processing software. A different multiplier is applied differently to the red, green, and blue channels during RAW conversion depending on the setting, and if you're doing that conversion from a RAW file, you ...


27

As far as I know, the best bet for Linux is Darktable. Workflow management with raw and JPEG editing all in one. Some teaser images from their screenshot site:


27

The look you are going for is known as low key lighting. It is not necessary for the room to be dark. You just need to put enough light on your subject that there is a large enough difference between the shadows and the highlights. I took this self portrait by shooting into a mirror in a fully lit room. By using a good amount of flash power I could use a ...


25

No - the aperture is set by the physical blades in the lens when you take the photo; a RAW "image" contains the readings from the sensor when the photo was taken, so there's no way you can go back and modify the light which was captured by the sensor. While it's not as obvious, this is equivalent to asking "Can I modify what the camera was pointing at from a ...


25

The thing that sets off the alarm is the perfectly bright and uniform lighting in the room, especially on its ceiling. The room should be quite dark, since the sun is on the other side of the building (according to the building in the background). You can see through the window (and in the big mirror) that the ceiling of the balcony is more realistically in ...


24

Simply select and copy the screen/glare you want to overlay, and paste it to a new layer. Set the Blending Mode to Hard Light. Then paste in your product image in a new layer and place it underneath the glare layer (you will obviously need to do some jiggery pokery to fit this image onto the screen in the photo). Result:


24

You need to adjust for the color temperature of the light source. Additionally. when the light source is of such a limited spectrum as appears to be the case here, you need to add more light that covers a wider portion of the visible spectrum. The relatively bright sky in the background fooled your camera's Auto White Balance into thinking that is what ...


24

I'd guess it's as simple as selecting the subject in Photoshop - with a tad more care & attention than I've used below, then leeching out the saturation in the background & tonally balancing towards a sepia effect. As a very quick demo I did the same thing but made it a pretty garish purple instead. Once you have your mask you can treat inside &...


23

Check out Fro Knows Photo. There is a weekly RAW file you can edit and you can post your result on the forums (they are at edit 81 at the time of writing). Jared (the guy behind the site) then selects a handfull RAW edits from the forum and comments on them in a youtube video. As a plus, Jared and/or Adam will give a full tutorial (again youtube video) on ...


23

Usually, people are aware that they have it, but don't want it to be so pronounced. If you can use Gimp, there is a plugin called Wavelet decompose. In this site there is some information on how to use it to retouch pictures. I like that technique because you don't need to complete remove what doesn't please you, but you can minimize it so the picture ...


21

To do this in Photoshop (Available in Photoshop Extended and later CC versions only): File > Scripts > Load Files into Stack Select all layers and use Edit > Auto Align to align them (if necessary) Layer > Smart Objects > Convert to Smart Object Layer > Smart Objects > Stack Mode and choose Median This will compare pixels between all your images that you'...


21

The focus seems too even to me.  I would expect a photo taken to have something blurrier, either in the foreground or background.


20

There are so many variables here, it would be impossible to give you a precise answer. It depends entirely what you are wanting to do... The kit lens can, in many cases, give a satisfactory photograph, however there are two main areas in which the kit lens suffers in competition against a pro lens: Aperture. Kit lenses are slow. They are usually about ...


20

Basically, you need to do some post processing on this image. From the original, the first step I performed was to make the darkest part black and the lightest white. That alone made a sizeable diffefence since your original lightest spot was only (.37, .34, .38). In other words, you were wasting over 60% of the dynamic range. Original: Black and white ...


20

So, here's what I got in just a few minutes using two basic tools: Curves, and Unsharp mask: I used Gimp, but this is basic stuff any decent image editing software will have. Here's all I did. First, I used the curves tool to dramatically increase the black point, increasing shadow contrast: Then, I pulled the curve upwards to brighten the (new) midtones: ...


19

Just because the image is mostly black doesn't mean the scene is dark. With a flash positioned on the left pointing at the subject (he's facing the flash) and a black backdrop you could possibly even pull this off in daylight. Start with a low ISO, a middle of the road aperture and the sync speed for shutter speed (probably 1/200th or 1/250th). The point ...


19

In case there are multiple crazy lights casting different tones from different directions; you only have JPEGs; or you just need a quick solution, an easy way to fix color cast is to go for black and white. Here's what I got in Gimp under a minute (Colors -> Desaturate -> Average), including some increase of contrast using Curves tool:


19

Image stacking works to reduce noise because the noise is random — or at least, ideally so — while the stars are (famously) constant. That means that (once you've corrected for rotation) the stars will be in every photo. But noise — at least, the kinds of noise that this can correct for — is already random fluctuations... maybe there in one image, and not ...


18

I usually use this technique for pictures taken through windows, but I think it works here, too. In GIMP, I go to Colors | Curves and change the slope of the curve to use all of the available color information: I like to set the new start/end points for the curve to where the little black line along the bottom of the curves starts and ends. Usually ...


18

You can get rid of most of it in Lightroom/Camera Raw. Move the blacks/shadows sliders to the left. The fireworks are so bright they'll be at the other end of the histogram and largely unaffected. You could do this with levels or curves. At that point, your sky will be very black, so you can paint/mask out remaining smoke pretty easily It's possible ...


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