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118

At the sort of geeky/cosplay events you describe a good solution might be to wear a T-Shirt which addresses the issue. Here's an example I found with a quick search. This should do a few things. To attendees it helps you look like "one of us". It indicates you are relatively serious about your photography, not just a random person with a point and shoot. ...


41

they always ask me to do it. However, all of them commonly say that I cannot take nice photos It's weird that they don't like your work but continue to ask you to do it. Maybe there's some teasing/flirting going on? It's great that you want to improve your photography, though. Keep it up. There are a lot of conventions about what makes a good photo, and ...


40

It's not the camera they have to take seriously: it's you. Get past the shyness. You're all fans/reenactors together, you already have an instant bonding point. Appreciate the costume work they've done. You don't have to fake anything. Just be willing to put yourself forward and ask. Show folks what you're doing and get them involved as collaborators in ...


36

Firstly, you should pose your model. There are ways to accentuate parts of the body naturally. Try posing her arms so that they squeeze the bosom. Another option then is to break all the rules of portrait photography, and instead of using a long lens (that flattens features) use a wider angle (around 24-35mm on full frame maybe) and get closer! By getting ...


28

I'm going to throw lots of ideas at a wall and make them stick. But changing cameras because it doesn't look the part is wrong. Use what is right for you. Start with an introduction, and offer to show previous work. Whenever I make first contact with a model (granted it's online), I always introduce myself and provide examples. My business cards; each one ...


26

The models are obviously seeking maximum exposure. They'll assume the people with several thousands worth of camera gear on them will be selling/providing the shots to magazines, big blogs, etc. Meanwhile, you with your little point and shoot look like you're adding to your own personal photo album/portfolio. If you are providing these shots to somewhere ...


24

I have come across this previously and unfortunately, due to the world we now live in, I learnt that people in general have a somewhat distorted view of how they look and what their best look is on a photograph. People, everyday, see themselves as a reflection in a mirror where they are able to create looks that they find pleasing. These looks are often ...


22

Fun idea. That could be called hyperlapse. If you use a specific memory card for that project, you can always switch from viewing the first photo of the project to live view. Another option is that you built a box with a grid or something and put it in front of your camera, like the old matte paint technique used in cinema. Instead of having a paint of a ...


16

Tilting forward may help, if you can use those types of poses. Also, if you can use angle light, or angled behind lights, the shadows will accentuate the bosom. However, getting this right may be tricky, because the face may need different lighting, or will show bad face texture or shadows. So you will have to have her turn the head to a different ...


15

A wide angle lens might help, but do not angle the lens upwards - a shot up the nostrils is not very pleasing. While not a shooting technique, you could increase the bosom size while editing the picture. Also poses, where the model leans slightly towards the photographer help, and the model should push out her bosom (make a hollow back). Ask your model ...


14

I don't think it's about how people view your camera, it's about how people view you. If you're using an X-T2 and a 55/1.2 lens, it's quite enough for portraiture and the camera is capable of excellent results. However... You describe yourself as "I'm this petite girl with a 'tiny' camera." Think of yourself as a confident woman with a first class camera ...


13

Due to the way perspective works the larger eye should be the one closer to the camera and the smaller eye should be the one further away. Usually. Things that are of equal size look larger when they are closer and smaller when they are further away. Our brains expect that when we view a person from an angle the eye further away from us will appear smaller ...


12

Other than adding a battery grip or flash, you can't really make the camera larger, so it seems to me that your best options are to either prevent your subjects from judging the camera, or challenge their judgement: hide the camera: When you approach someone to ask them to pose, keep the camera out of sight. If you wear the camera on a strap, slide it ...


11

If you want the ultimate in recognition (whether rightly or wrongly) of being the baddest pro at the geekfest, get a couple of friends to be "assistants" and be your "voice activated light stands." Give one a monopod with a speedlight and small modifier on the end and the other a 30-40" reflector set to carry while following you around. And since you'll have ...


11

Consider moving closer to the subject and following the 'Rule of Thirds'. The problem with most of the advice you've been given is that there's too much of it. How are you going to remember it all the next time you need to take a photo? Where do you start? Telling you to improve your composition would be so broad that it would be useless. So I picked ...


10

I assume you mean their bosom, not their chests? Firstly, some reactions to other answers: I would be careful about wider angle lenses as it makes them look less attractive in general. Poses and clothing can do a lot. And using a model with a bigger bosom helps a lot, too. However, post editing is often applied in the professional world. In Photoshop, ...


10

This is a basic low-key shot, but without the benefit of a flash you're going to need to work harder to get the big difference between subject and background. Without a flash, a good bet for the kind of shot you're talking about is to pick an exterior doorway where whatever's outside will be good and dark, like a backyard with no lights. Open the door wide ...


9

Just take each shot so that it looks roughly right but with a wider lens/further away. Then match all images in post processing by cropping. This is a lot simpler than matching the images in camera. At least in terms of positioning the subject within the frame. Considering the pose itself I would not strive for a perfect match. If something looks too good, ...


8

What used to be a common pose for this that others haven't mentioned yet is: lying on the stomach and shoulders up at < 45 degree angle on elbows, similar to an upward-facing dog yoga position, but much less pronounced, while on the beach wearing a bikini. This allows gravity to bring out the bosom. As for clothing, push-ups aren't always a great idea, ...


8

Well, one can write an entire book on this. Also there isn't a definitive answer. But, as you say, here are some "tips and tricks": make it clear that you're on "their side". That you're helping them to make the shoot good. arrange a little their clothes, their hair, take an invisible piece of dirt (it doesn't need to really exist) from their clothes - this ...


7

Are you posing or do you have a model posing for you? Most likely, professional photographers are going to employ professional models, either those who they've worked with before, or by going to a modelling agency for a suitable model for the type of shoot and the type of end result that they're trying to achieve. Professional models usually have an ...


7

A great way to show great friendship between buddies, is to let them be themselves. Its amazing what they will come up with after the initial tentativeness of the situation, all whilst you just click away. Props is also a good way to show off a friendship. These will be props that the subjects bring with them. These will be items that have a common ...


7

Is working as a model a good way to learn photography? It can be, sure. Rather, if the question were more specifically, "is working as a model a good way to learn portrait photography?", sure, why not? Depending on some conditions, that is... Is the photographer good? Is he experienced, does he know how to communicate with and direct models? Does he know ...


7

I realise that I could measure the distance in each shot, and have a point on her body centered within the view finder. But what about possible elevation changes changing the angle? A quick way to get close is to decide on the pose you want to use and do the first shot at home. Make a print and keep it in your camera bag so that you can refer to it whenever ...


7

Consider using an off-camera flash, with a portable flash modifier. I was helping my Dad take portraits of my mom at a Christmas lights show at night. I put a radio trigger on his, and acted as a voice-activate light stand with a fstopper flash disk on the flash. You'll be amazed how may people think that we're pros, and we got some nicely lit photos to ...


6

Do desensitization therapy by having her wear a mask. Something like cool Marti Gras masks or vintage costume party masks or ethnic shaman masks, so you'll get cool photos anyway. Have her model clothing and household items without her face in the shot (a great excuse to splurge on a fancy manacure, your treat). In all that, have her appreciate the good ...


6

I'm assuming you are a photographer, and you interact with people. Saying "That one", "good", "extend your leg", "nice", "gorgeous", is part of interacting with people. I don't think any model, not one on the planet, would learn 1000 different names, with 1000 variation levels on each to pose, and to practice ...


6

I'd use a flash on a stand triggered by your camera's flash. Control the spread of the lighting by using a 20 degree grid. A Yongnuo flash isn't terribly expensive and will help get the shot you are looking for. Or you can rent lighting gear from a rental house for under $75 for a 3-day rental. Obligatory links to the Strobist blog: http://strobist....


6

I don't think modeling is a good way to learn photography at all. It's a decent way to learn how to plan and perform a shoot but it has very very little with photography. She won't be controlling the aperture, the shutter speed, the lighting, she won't be picking the angles and dictating the composition. She'll be sitting there while he does all of that. It'...


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