11

When an image contains pure white (#fff or values RGB 255/255/255) - we refer to this as "blown" or "blown out". There is nothing you can do to alter these pixels to gain lost detail. For example, I've cranked the levels to darken everything, yet here those pixels are...in all their blown glory: Keeping that in mind, the only thing that you can do is ...


8

Another approach, since as Hueco mentions in his answer, this detail is blown out and unrecoverable - is we can try to reduce it's impact by attempting to darken some of the blurred "halo" effects that surround the bright reflections. The process here is not too dissimilar to manually performing an unsharp mask. I'm going to focus on this one section, as it'...


7

OK, so I didn't have a box of fascinating delicacies to try this out on - I just had a box of eggs & some blueberries in the fridge, which I sat by the window-sill in direct but quite muted sunlight. if you can't read it, it's because I flipped it left to right to better match the OP It's by no means the perfect photo, just a quick example. Basically ...


6

Straight away I should mention that lunar photography is different that astrophotography of deep-sky objects. The types of frames you are describing (calibration frames) are extremely helpful for deep-sky objects but not as useful for lunar photography. You probably wont need to worry too much about noise in lunar photography because you can take those ...


5

Others have covered rather well your very limited post processing options. Of course the best way is to shoot the image with the proper exposure to begin with. While this doesn't really answer the question directly, it is far too long for a comment. The following does respond to a comment by the OP to another answer. Thanks! I've learned a whole lot, ...


5

Come to the light side. We may not have cookies, but we have legitimate free software. The creators of Photoshop, as is their right, decided to keep the internals of the program proprietary and to charge money for access and use. But, other programmers have decided to take a different approach and created RAW-processing software like Darktable and ...


5

I've experienced what you are talking about. The direct cause, as often happens with such 100x slowdowns, is that the software starts swapping to disk (extensively using scratch files in case of Photoshop). So essentially yes, this is a memory issue. You can check for it by purging the undo cache, or just saving the work and continuing after restarting ...


5

If you run the file through ExifTool, you'll see that it contains a huge number of Document Ancestors elements: Document Ancestors : 0, 0000A6C7815905497C2762FB3073AC1B, ... ... Warning : [Minor] Extracted only 1000 photoshop: DocumentAncestors items. Ignore minor errors to extract all If you remove all EXIF data (...


4

A combination of the Clone Stamp and the Patch tool are your quickest options to get rid of the tripod in under 5 minutes. Start with cloning the carpet. Ensure you match patterns. Then, using the clone stamp, cut lines through the tripod so that you have a clean section to move with the Patch tool. Align the Patch tool selections with areas that match. ...


4

The best option for you is to clone from the other image. And if done correctly, no one will know that you edited the image. Open the image in photoshop Next, open the other image in photoshop as a separate file Select just the portion of the image that needs to be cloned Drag that selection into the main image Cmd or Ctrl T to bring up the transform ...


4

Why does this happen? Is photoshop creating new information? ... The max size should be no more than 5 * 5 = 25Mb, right? Your source images are JPG, so it doesn't make sense to compare their sizes with a final uncompressed TIF. (Apples to Oranges.) You will get a more reasonable output size for comparison if you resave your TIF output as JPG. (Apples to ...


4

If your images simply had a magenta cast, then simply adding in some green would balance it out and you could be on your way. Unfortunately, you are not so lucky. Your images are magenta in color because the other dye layers in the film have broken down. You have magenta information but have lost the cyan and yellow. Simply adding green will not suffice. ...


4

Yes, it is possible. The key to getting the reflection to mirror all of the subject at the same size is to shoot at as low an angle to the surface of the water or other flat, reflective surface, as possible. The higher the camera is above the reflective surface and the larger the angle between the lens' optical axis and the reflective surface, the greater ...


4

PPI is unimportant and meaningless in a camera picture (inches of what?). The only thing that matters is the actual size in pixels. The only kind of capture where the PPI matters is a scan, because it lets you print the image at its initial size. Otherwise the PPI it is just an indication of the intended size, and can be changed at will...


3

I think you're talking about the color-separated doubled areas, like this: right? It's pretty hard to really tell with a low resolution, very low quality sample where the center has been scribbled over. But my guess is that this is a post-processing digital effect meant to roughly simulate exaggerated chromatic aberration, which causes different ...


3

When you view the image with a normal image viewer, is it mostly dark? If not, a gamma curve has been applied. That is, does it look like this? That's what you'll get with a pure dump of linear values into a 16-bit tiff file. Or, encoded across 8 bits, and demosaiced, and with white-balance adjusted, something like this: If it looks like that or similar, ...


3

Finally, after days of reading I found an answer! In photoshop go to: Edit>Preferences>Performance>Graphics Processor Settings>Advanced Settings> And set the Drawing Mode to Basic Restart the program.


3

DNG files are "RAW" files and are not made to be directly edited. Trying to export DNG after Photoshop editing is like trying to get a painting in two packages: one for the blank canvas and another one for the paint. Saving DNG files is possible with Lightroom because all the changes you can make with it are saved in a "sidecar file" (XMP) or in the ...


3

I found the solution by my by myself! I had changed pc during the moving I have changed the user name from Fabio to fabio. Lightroom had found the files but does not recognize the folders as the same.


3

Layers always increase images size, as photoshop tells you when saving. Depending on the original pixel size, the size of the Tiff is the total nuber of pixel x3 x nº of layers. But with LZW compression you get a lossless, nice tiff


3

Kind of, but it won't look right. You can set the black BG as the white point using a levels adjustment layer. This will make the image almost entirely white. Then use the layer blending option and set the layer to only affect darker tones. This will leave you an image that is light and mid tones. Mask out the surrounding BG as required, and put a white ...


3

That's not going to happen, I'm afraid. Samsung 500T is all you're ever going to extract from that image. Aside from the fact that it was shot in very low light with a flash, which has swamped a lot of it, it's also been sized up & perhaps sharpened from a much smaller image by the looks of it. This will not gain any information. You cannot create ...


3

Yes, internally Photoshop converts 16 bit tiffs to 15 bits where 0:32768 is the same range as 0:255 in 8 bits. Adobe's Chris Cox confirms it here: https://forums.adobe.com/thread/792212 And I have verified it by creating 16 bit tiffs in Matlab and examining how Photoshop reads the. Note that Photoshop expands it back to 16 bits when saving tiff files by ...


3

Generally, when you do this with an image editor like Photoshop, yes, this is destructive. That's because the software doesn't keep a JPEG-encoded version of the image in memory to write back unchanged. It decodes it to its own internal working format, and then re-encodes to whatever output format you want when you save. (It may be smart enough to use ...


2

I could not find a solution with raw files, I know the recent version of hugin is supposed to support raw files using dcraw but I cannot test it myself. The next good solution in my opinion is to convert all of your raws to tif files or other lossless image format and use them. For my method I mainly hugin_tools on the terminal but I also use the GUI so ...


2

There's no way I know of to apply a preset with it not re-zeroing the adjustments, as they are all based off of a zero setting. However there is an easier way to do what you are doing without leaving lightroom. Create an Export Preset with the following settings: Export Location: Export To: Same folder as original photo Check "Add to This Catalog" Set "...


2

Since you seem open to the idea of Photoshopping, I would work on the bird's background: Create a layer for the entire tree-lined background and houses. Boost it so you can see some minor details in the trees. Then clone-stamp out the houses directly behind the bird. The bird is competing for the viewer's attention with the houses behind it. So eliminate ...


2

If you really want to decrease the TIFF size, you should be looking at lossy compression. A good question is, why do you want to use TIFF and why not JPG in the first place? However, lossy compression isn't good if you plan to edit the file later, so I understand the desire to use TIFF. Another way is to just store the CR3 RAW file and recreate the TIFF as ...


2

There is no way to line up the particular images you took/posted. But there is absolutely a way to setup your camera & tripod to so that you can take perfectly aligned images for panoramas. What you are experiencing is known as parallax, and the technique involves finding the no-parallax point of the lens. At a minimum, you need a camera mount that can ...


2

You must be using 16 bit TIFF files? But 16 bit TIF seems overkill, since you've surely already done the extreme shifts of gamma and white balance while it was raw. I would suggest 8 bit TIF with LZW compression. TIF does offer LZW compression, which is a little less effective in 16 bits vs 8 bits. But while not dramatic size reduction like JPG, LZW is ...


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