25

Upon viewing his portfolio at the link you provided, my first thought was push processing. In push processing, one typically underexposes the shot (that is, meters and set exposure as if the the film were a higher ISO than it really is), then compensate in the darkroom by overdeveloping the film to account for the underexposed shot. Push processing tends to ...


23

If you want to achieve this digitally note how the whites aren't full white and the blacks aren't full black. You can do that e.g. in Lightroom or any other editing tool by pulling the endpoints for the highlights and shadows towards the middle. To get a creamy tint, select the RGB Blue-Channel and reduce the Highlights-max Point. This bumps up the yellow:...


9

If those were film images, I'd say they were "overexposed" by about one stop and developed at N-1 (pull 1) to ensure well filled shadows. They may also have been printed on a warm-tone paper, and the prints preflashed to rein in the whites. Presuming they're digital in origin, it's likely filters with similar results were applied in post Generally, this ...


7

OK, so I didn't have a box of fascinating delicacies to try this out on - I just had a box of eggs & some blueberries in the fridge, which I sat by the window-sill in direct but quite muted sunlight. if you can't read it, it's because I flipped it left to right to better match the OP It's by no means the perfect photo, just a quick example. Basically ...


7

If you look at any color wheel, you have two axes on the wheel: To correct any color cast, this is usually enough. You can correct the main source of color shift in natural light on the temp axis (blue/yellow), and then do the fine tuning on the tint axis (magenta/green). Tint most often occurs through artificial light. magenta red | ...


6

Straight away I should mention that lunar photography is different that astrophotography of deep-sky objects. The types of frames you are describing (calibration frames) are extremely helpful for deep-sky objects but not as useful for lunar photography. You probably wont need to worry too much about noise in lunar photography because you can take those ...


5

If you run the file through ExifTool, you'll see that it contains a huge number of Document Ancestors elements: Document Ancestors : 0, 0000A6C7815905497C2762FB3073AC1B, ... ... Warning : [Minor] Extracted only 1000 photoshop: DocumentAncestors items. Ignore minor errors to extract all If you remove all EXIF data (...


5

The banding is caused by differences in exposure across frames. You have several options to address the problem. Use the same exposure settings for every image. Manually set aperture, ISO, and shutter speed. If there is a huge variation of brightness levels across the scene, you can take bracketed exposures and process as HDR prior to stitching, as long ...


5

The basic idea is to posterize the image. Here is a rough first approach. Edit the curves "freehand" But as we do not want too much banding on the colors, let's turn it into a grayscale image first and then edit the curves. We could now convert the image to palette color mode (3 colors) and edit them. But the real additional step is to vectorize the ...


4

I could not find a solution with raw files, I know the recent version of hugin is supposed to support raw files using dcraw but I cannot test it myself. The next good solution in my opinion is to convert all of your raws to tif files or other lossless image format and use them. For my method I mainly hugin_tools on the terminal but I also use the GUI so ...


4

Why does this happen? Is photoshop creating new information? ... The max size should be no more than 5 * 5 = 25Mb, right? Your source images are JPG, so it doesn't make sense to compare their sizes with a final uncompressed TIF. (Apples to Oranges.) You will get a more reasonable output size for comparison if you resave your TIF output as JPG. (Apples to ...


4

If your images simply had a magenta cast, then simply adding in some green would balance it out and you could be on your way. Unfortunately, you are not so lucky. Your images are magenta in color because the other dye layers in the film have broken down. You have magenta information but have lost the cyan and yellow. Simply adding green will not suffice. ...


4

Yes, it is possible. The key to getting the reflection to mirror all of the subject at the same size is to shoot at as low an angle to the surface of the water or other flat, reflective surface, as possible. The higher the camera is above the reflective surface and the larger the angle between the lens' optical axis and the reflective surface, the greater ...


4

PPI is unimportant and meaningless in a camera picture (inches of what?). The only thing that matters is the actual size in pixels. The only kind of capture where the PPI matters is a scan, because it lets you print the image at its initial size. Otherwise the PPI it is just an indication of the intended size, and can be changed at will...


3

Kind of, but it won't look right. You can set the black BG as the white point using a levels adjustment layer. This will make the image almost entirely white. Then use the layer blending option and set the layer to only affect darker tones. This will leave you an image that is light and mid tones. Mask out the surrounding BG as required, and put a white ...


3

That's not going to happen, I'm afraid. Samsung 500T is all you're ever going to extract from that image. Aside from the fact that it was shot in very low light with a flash, which has swamped a lot of it, it's also been sized up & perhaps sharpened from a much smaller image by the looks of it. This will not gain any information. You cannot create ...


3

Layers always increase images size, as photoshop tells you when saving. Depending on the original pixel size, the size of the Tiff is the total nuber of pixel x3 x nº of layers. But with LZW compression you get a lossless, nice tiff


3

I found the solution by my by myself! I had changed pc during the moving I have changed the user name from Fabio to fabio. Lightroom had found the files but does not recognize the folders as the same.


3

Yes, internally Photoshop converts 16 bit tiffs to 15 bits where 0:32768 is the same range as 0:255 in 8 bits. Adobe's Chris Cox confirms it here: https://forums.adobe.com/thread/792212 And I have verified it by creating 16 bit tiffs in Matlab and examining how Photoshop reads the. Note that Photoshop expands it back to 16 bits when saving tiff files by ...


3

Generally, when you do this with an image editor like Photoshop, yes, this is destructive. That's because the software doesn't keep a JPEG-encoded version of the image in memory to write back unchanged. It decodes it to its own internal working format, and then re-encodes to whatever output format you want when you save. (It may be smart enough to use ...


3

In my copy of Photoshop CC 2018 these are located under Filter -> Camera Raw Filter: There you have the shadow, highlights, blacks and whites in the lower right:


3

Adjustment LAYERS are non-destructive in Photoshop. You can delete or disable them at any time and get back to where you started w/o any losses. Adjustment layers only add data to the file; as shown by the file size (document size can be selected in lower left of the UI). The problem with 8bit vs 16bit is the accuracy of the math (digital edits are all ...


3

I always do the color grading stuff before, because if done after retouching it can make the editing more visible. The edited parts are always a bit different from their surroundings and will react differently to the color tools.


3

With selective grade contrast papers and a variety of film processes you can achieve these results. I don't know if there's negative combinations or pre-flashing of the paper, but all of these are easily achieved in the darkroom after a couple of weeks of practice. I hate to say it but these appear to be pretty simple- so the fact that they're interesting ...


3

This kind of color reduction became popular with the "Obama hope" poster, and looking for plugins under than name yields results. Another method is to "posterize" the image to reduce the number of colors (and hope for the best) or sample a few dominant colors into a palette and then convert the image to use the palette. OTOH, you can't take any random ...


2

Not a Photoshop-based answer: You are making things difficult for yourself with your granite background. The first thing to do is to shoot your objects against a plain background, then if needed you select the background and not the object, then invert the selection (but if done properly you can get a background so white that you won't even need to cut it ...


2

If you mean the very narrow plane of focus, it is possibly obtained with a tilt-shift lens where, instead of using the tilt that makes the focus plane cover the subject, they used the tilt that make the focus plane have a small intersection with the subject. It's also possibly just a very wide aperture for a shallow depth of field.


2

Lightroom uses ProPhoto RGB, the monitor in Adobe RGB. Does this mean that the colors I'm seeing through the monitor when editing is being translated to Adobe RGB? Yes. But not quite. Your monitor is (likely) not exactly AdobeRGB; it has its own colour space which for your Asus should be close to AdobeRGB. Now, whenever you work with a colour-managed ...


2

Use green screen & some fast isolation software, such as those from FXHome - the older PhotoKey or the new Imerge (which I haven't tried yet, but seems to also be half the price of the old one.) Other solutions are available, but that's the one I've used the most. Googling for stills software isn't as easy as for movie, but it's out there somewhere. I ...


2

You do not have Ps, but you can use Gimp, or Krita, or Paint.net, or FireAlpaca, or MediBang Pro, or a bunch of free raster applications. You can also import the images on Open Office Draw. Or use Scribus to crop the images or even Inkscape. Inclusive you can crop an image using IrfanView. Or as this is a Photo forum, you can be creative and take the 3 ...


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