7

If you look at any color wheel, you have two axes on the wheel: To correct any color cast, this is usually enough. You can correct the main source of color shift in natural light on the temp axis (blue/yellow), and then do the fine tuning on the tint axis (magenta/green). Tint most often occurs through artificial light. magenta red | ...


5

The banding is caused by differences in exposure across frames. You have several options to address the problem. Use the same exposure settings for every image. Manually set aperture, ISO, and shutter speed. If there is a huge variation of brightness levels across the scene, you can take bracketed exposures and process as HDR prior to stitching, as long ...


3

Adjustment LAYERS are non-destructive in Photoshop. You can delete or disable them at any time and get back to where you started w/o any losses. Adjustment layers only add data to the file; as shown by the file size (document size can be selected in lower left of the UI). The problem with 8bit vs 16bit is the accuracy of the math (digital edits are all ...


2

There can be less color in the result, yes. In a pixel, each color channel can take only one of 256 values (2⁸). Each adjustment transforms these 256 values to some other 256 values. But there is a constraint: for any pair of two values of input, the highest value of the two must remain the highest (otherwise you get an effect called solarization). If you ...


1

You should avoid having photoshop do anything automatically if you can. As long as you have a good monitor and good eyes, everything you do by eye will be far better than what software can do. Turn off all image correction in your camera and do levels, contrast, and saturation by eye. Use the fewest pics you can use to make it look good as far as ...


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