16

Here's a dirty little secret: 35mm film has no aspect ratio at all until it is exposed. It is just one blank piece of film a specific width (35mm) and any practical length with perforations occupying the outer edges that leave a 24mm wide strip in between the perforations. What determines the dimensions of the photo is the size of the film plane each ...


15

Yes. And it usually depends how much you are paying. The more you pay per print, the more likely there will be a human factor. The big processors(wallmart etc) are unlikely to have the time or skill to go over files before print, its usually a plug-n-go system. I used to run a print shop - and I specialised in 2 things, Bulk prints, and high end art / ...


9

You can have slide film processed like normal film, left in long strips, or more commonly they are individually cut into single frames and mounted in a cardboard or plastic holder, which keeps them flat, and these mounted slides can then be put in a cartridge of a slide projector. The mounts can be seen here. The processing is exactly the same, so no ...


8

There are a number of drop ship printers out there. A few include: White House Custom Color MPIX Bay Photo I recommend looking at their web sites to determine if their needs suit your particular ones. Many local professional photographers in my area use these three services. I have used 2 of the 3 myself without issue.


6

While not a traditional "print lab", there's a web service that integrates with several print labs and gives exactly what you want: SmugMug. I believe we hit all your requirements: All prints from SmugMug are drop shipped without the invoice. Some items do ship with a workorder, but there's no prices on it. Pro account holders have several branding ...


6

Have a look at http://www.pwinty.com This in an API for printing and shipping photos, and offers worldwide shipping. They let you specify your own custom branding, and invoices to be included within the package- sounds like exactly what you are after.


5

It's possible, but Mpix is trying to protect you from yourself. Your camera's 8 megapixels make an image with something like 2448 × 3264 pixels. That means that when you print an image 16 inches wide, you end up with about 150 pixels per inch. If you look closely, you may see some blockiness, and the phone camera's image quality probably isn't such that it ...


5

Without example pictures, it's difficult to tell exactly what the problem (or constellation of problems) is, but what you are describing could easily be the result of extreme underexposure of the film (more than 2 stops) without any compensation in development (that is, the film was developed for the normal time). Colour noise happens in film as well as in ...


5

I'm assuming you probably used a compact type camera with an image shape of 4:3 (long side of image is 4/3 longer than short side, which describes a "shape"). But a 6x4 print is the shape 3:2... simply not the same shape. So not all of the image will fit on the paper. Images generally have to be cropped first to fit the desired paper shape. And most print ...


4

It depends. You can instruct them to not do any "correction" and sometimes you will still get 'auto-corrected' or 'operator-corrected' prints. Some labs offer "machine scanned and corrected prints" at one price tier and "human reviewed" prints at a higher priced tier. Sometimes it depends on who is operating the machine when your prints are created and the ...


4

I regularly over expose my film by 1/3 to 2/3 or 1 full stop depending on the conditions and the film and with the knowledge of how that film behaves and develops in the developers i use. Generally speaking overexposing film is better (to a point) than underexposing as you can not get details in the shadows in post processing if you did not record those ...


4

My guess is... shutter problem, like second curtain slow to close at the end. Sometimes old equipment can be slow and idiosyncratic when getting started or in cold temperature. Your camera may need maintenance (clean, lube, adjust).


3

The better question may be, does it matter? For what a low budget print shop can afford to pay their technician, I wouldn't expect anything great. At 2 to 6 cents a photo, even if they can keep the machine running all the time, they probably are not going to have a substantial profit margin. Paying the technician much above $10 to $12 an hour is probably ...


3

They're not to know what you plan to use the print for and probably wouldn't care. They're a supplier and if they offer it as a service they're not going to care what you do with the prints they send you. I'd go elsewhere at those prices unless there's a killer feature that your chosen provider offers that you've not mentioned? By way of comparison: ...


3

I worked at a one hour photolab for a year and a half and in almost every department of a professional lab over the course of 15 years. Matching colors sometimes requires extensive work. Often we had to request a color sample to match the most important color in the image (like bridesmaid dresses or other fabric swatches). The problem lies in the camera ...


3

I know this comes a little late, but I'd like to add info for other people printing images at Costco. First, Costco supplies printer profiles for all of their locations via this website: http://www.drycreekphoto.com/icc/ Just browse for your local Costco and download the appropriate profile(s). That website also has a handy link at the top to a page which ...


3

Definitely check the negatives first for something similar, although as osullic pointed out, it's pretty rare that a lab will goof it up. The shutter is a good possibility as outlined in xiota's answer, but I also wouldn't rule out a light leak. Frame 4 has the problem along the top and right side which, as the film is exposed, would translate to the ...


2

If you go for quality, choose http://www.smartphoto.fr/ They have many years experience with photo printing. There website is very easy to use. You don't need to download software. Everything can be made and ordered on the website. The price is very reasonable to me. The small amount you'll pay more will give you a huge difference in quality. I just saw ...


2

I'd recommend DS Colour Labs. 50p for a 10x8 and really good quality


2

If you're using software like Photoshop, which works with a canvas, you can choose your canvas size when you create a new document. If I recall correctly, you can choose a size in pixels, picas, points, cm, and inches.


2

While it is possible, the quality will suffer. The general recommendation is that photos be printed at at least 300 dots per inch or pixels per inch. At 8mp, this will not quite fill an 8 by 11 sheet of paper. You could print at 150 ppi and just barely get a 16 by 20, but the quality would likely be noticeably lower up close.


2

Use a chromogenic B&W film; that is, a B&W film that can be developed using the same C-41 process as ordinary colour films. That way, any shop that can develop colour films can also develop your B&W film. Ilford makes such a film called XP2 Super, but other manufacturers make it as well. An alternative is quite simply to shoot colour film and ...


2

I guess your girlfriend was using 135 film (regular 35 mm frames) and that format is large enough to deliver amazing results. Search for the tag 135 film in flickr, 500px or alike and you will find results that I bet you'll find stunning. They will sport amazing resolution and color rendition that will without doubt beat camera the quality of photos from ...


2

If you have experience of sending files for print in the past and receiving prints that are "muddy" and don't match your expectations, the culprit here is "colour management", not the file format. The bits and bytes you upload to the internet are going to be the same ones that arrive at the print shop; the problem is whether they are "interpreted" correctly. ...


2

From my experience (25+ years in the photo industry), Fuji film tends to handle overexposure by one stop without the need to pull-process. However, as Alaska Man stated, if you shot mainly in high-contrast or bright lighting, having the roll pulled a half-stop or full stop should help -- not fix 100%, just help. Overexposing actually decreases contrast, not ...


2

If like for an overhead projector to project, I think the question is How can you find a shop that will print transparencies for you? They are casually called slides, but the key word is Transparency. I think most copy shops do that, call them and ask them. Office Max, Office Depot, Staples, etc. Or you can print them at home on your printer. The media ...


1

I used to run a print shop. The reason a large print is cheaper per square inch is not just a retail thing, its a real cost to the retailer. (depending on the system used of course) Personally I wouldnt care, as one big print as a LOT less work for the printer. The only time I started to charge extra was when people wanted astrophotography prints, which ...


1

YES, but it may not be what you think. When you submit photos to a lab to be printed a technician will likely see every one and have the option to correct it or auto correct it as they see fit. However, unless you are very discerning or the technician does a bad job you will likely never notice. The quality of print is more greatly affected by the quality ...


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