16

Here's a dirty little secret: 35mm film has no aspect ratio at all until it is exposed. It is just one blank piece of film a specific width (35mm) and any practical length with perforations occupying the outer edges that leave a 24mm wide strip in between the perforations. What determines the dimensions of the photo is the size of the film plane each ...


15

Yes. And it usually depends how much you are paying. The more you pay per print, the more likely there will be a human factor. The big processors(wallmart etc) are unlikely to have the time or skill to go over files before print, its usually a plug-n-go system. I used to run a print shop - and I specialised in 2 things, Bulk prints, and high end art / ...


5

Without example pictures, it's difficult to tell exactly what the problem (or constellation of problems) is, but what you are describing could easily be the result of extreme underexposure of the film (more than 2 stops) without any compensation in development (that is, the film was developed for the normal time). Colour noise happens in film as well as in ...


5

I'm assuming you probably used a compact type camera with an image shape of 4:3 (long side of image is 4/3 longer than short side, which describes a "shape"). But a 6x4 print is the shape 3:2... simply not the same shape. So not all of the image will fit on the paper. Images generally have to be cropped first to fit the desired paper shape. And most print ...


4

It depends. You can instruct them to not do any "correction" and sometimes you will still get 'auto-corrected' or 'operator-corrected' prints. Some labs offer "machine scanned and corrected prints" at one price tier and "human reviewed" prints at a higher priced tier. Sometimes it depends on who is operating the machine when your prints are created and the ...


4

I regularly over expose my film by 1/3 to 2/3 or 1 full stop depending on the conditions and the film and with the knowledge of how that film behaves and develops in the developers i use. Generally speaking overexposing film is better (to a point) than underexposing as you can not get details in the shadows in post processing if you did not record those ...


4

My guess is... shutter problem, like second curtain slow to close at the end. Sometimes old equipment can be slow and idiosyncratic when getting started or in cold temperature. Your camera may need maintenance (clean, lube, adjust).


3

Definitely check the negatives first for something similar, although as osullic pointed out, it's pretty rare that a lab will goof it up. The shutter is a good possibility as outlined in xiota's answer, but I also wouldn't rule out a light leak. Frame 4 has the problem along the top and right side which, as the film is exposed, would translate to the ...


3

The better question may be, does it matter? For what a low budget print shop can afford to pay their technician, I wouldn't expect anything great. At 2 to 6 cents a photo, even if they can keep the machine running all the time, they probably are not going to have a substantial profit margin. Paying the technician much above $10 to $12 an hour is probably ...


3

I know this comes a little late, but I'd like to add info for other people printing images at Costco. First, Costco supplies printer profiles for all of their locations via this website: http://www.drycreekphoto.com/icc/ Just browse for your local Costco and download the appropriate profile(s). That website also has a handy link at the top to a page which ...


3

They're not to know what you plan to use the print for and probably wouldn't care. They're a supplier and if they offer it as a service they're not going to care what you do with the prints they send you. I'd go elsewhere at those prices unless there's a killer feature that your chosen provider offers that you've not mentioned? By way of comparison: ...


2

I guess your girlfriend was using 135 film (regular 35 mm frames) and that format is large enough to deliver amazing results. Search for the tag 135 film in flickr, 500px or alike and you will find results that I bet you'll find stunning. They will sport amazing resolution and color rendition that will without doubt beat camera the quality of photos from ...


2

If you have experience of sending files for print in the past and receiving prints that are "muddy" and don't match your expectations, the culprit here is "colour management", not the file format. The bits and bytes you upload to the internet are going to be the same ones that arrive at the print shop; the problem is whether they are "interpreted" correctly. ...


2

If like for an overhead projector to project, I think the question is How can you find a shop that will print transparencies for you? They are casually called slides, but the key word is Transparency. I think most copy shops do that, call them and ask them. Office Max, Office Depot, Staples, etc. Or you can print them at home on your printer. The media ...


2

From my experience (25+ years in the photo industry), Fuji film tends to handle overexposure by one stop without the need to pull-process. However, as Alaska Man stated, if you shot mainly in high-contrast or bright lighting, having the roll pulled a half-stop or full stop should help -- not fix 100%, just help. Overexposing actually decreases contrast, not ...


2

Modern color films are incorporated meaning the dyes are placed in the emulsion during manufacture. We are talking, C-41 color negative film and E-6 color positive films. These films entail multiple coats of gelatin laced with light sensitive salts of silver and dye in a leuco state (Greek for white). The silver salts in each coat have been adjusted so that ...


1

In C-41 replenishment chemistry, the purpose of a starter is to put the appropriate chemical into a "seasoned" state from the beginning, by introducing a controlled level of process byproducts to the fresh replenisher. This is important for the color developer, in order to give an in-spec process; if the developer is too "hot" (as it ...


1

In analog days, the (cheap) prints from negatives were (almost?) always cropped on all sides, probably to be on the safe side and not include any border. When i scanned my negatives, i was astonished how much detail had been lost on the prints. It is possible that the default printing process still crops the frame to prevent border problems.


1

I used to run a print shop. The reason a large print is cheaper per square inch is not just a retail thing, its a real cost to the retailer. (depending on the system used of course) Personally I wouldnt care, as one big print as a LOT less work for the printer. The only time I started to charge extra was when people wanted astrophotography prints, which ...


1

YES, but it may not be what you think. When you submit photos to a lab to be printed a technician will likely see every one and have the option to correct it or auto correct it as they see fit. However, unless you are very discerning or the technician does a bad job you will likely never notice. The quality of print is more greatly affected by the quality ...


1

There are decisions made in even an automated process that can and do adversely affect the quality of prints. These are, What process, and gamut of that process. What profile and how accurate that profile is on the day you need your prints done. How often the maintenance is done on the spectro used in the calibration process, etc. It's easy for any ...


1

As I have been scanning negatives for a while recently, I can offer my own insight here. In many cases, the 135 and 110 format negatives I've been scanning to not have even tone across the entire surface of the frame. With the larger format, there is often a pronounced "vignette" at the edges. For both formats sometimes the film just doesn't lay flat, but in ...


1

I personally like Whitewall - their main site is whitewall.com, but they also have sites for other European countries and the EU as a whole... (bit convoluted) Their French site is here: https://www.whitewall.fr/ Having said that, their focus is on high quality art prints, so it might be more than you need.


1

Mounted slides used to be the standard through the 2000's. After 2010 equipment and slide processing is harder to find. These days most people develop and keep the strips. Keeping it as a long strip is easier to damage (crease or kink) the film roll. The lab I use charges the same price to develop and sleeve or develop and mount at the time of developing....


1

I have had several batches of photos printed. Mostly 4x6's and they were fairly decent for use in family photo albums. You have to make sure that you crop the photos online prior to printing or you'll wind up with a number of headless or footless prints. Otherwise the price is very economical when you print more than 50 at a time.


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