68

I think Stan said it best in regards to composition and light, but I'll try to be a bit more specific about your pictures. What are you trying to show? This is the most important question to ask yourself before clicking the shutter. If you don't know, or don't address it, the audience won't know either and the picture will look sortof "pointless". Your ...


67

Once I've a JPEG photograph image file, how can I find out whether it is a RAW file or not? If you have a JPEG file, then it is not a RAW file. RAW isn't a single format, but rather a collective name for image files that contain data straight from the sensor. RAW files need to be processed in order to convert them to more general-purpose image formats like ...


66

Technique is typically at fault with "fuzzy" images 99% of the time with someone new to interchangeable lens cameras (ILC) with only a low-cost kit lens. The lens is not the problem. Low end kit lenses are limited, and they are cheap, and there are much nicer lenses around, but how you use one is more likely to be the fault than what glass is in the lens. ...


65

You can digitally enhance your pictures by increasing the brightness and adjusting the contrast. You can also crop out any parts of the image that don't contribute to the impressive nature of it. Take advantage of angles to convey attributes such as size and distance. Using perspective can also help liven up your images. I think the main concern is that the ...


37

In a reflective surface, the reflections are of the surrounding area. 1. The bigger the object the bigger space you need So, in your case, you need a really big space clean, let's say painted on white, like a photo studio. Look how humungous and clean a photo studio can be. I think you need about the space to fit two or three cars. A 90° corner could ...


33

There is a concept called "focus and recompose" which is typically used with cameras that have a limited spatial distribution of auto focus (AF) points or only one really good auto focus point in the center of the frame. If this is the case and the photographer wants to photograph a subject that is not incidentally at the same location within the frame as ...


33

Artistic photography follows the beauty is in the eye of the beholder ethos. There is nothing inherently immoral about it. Photography that is meant to make a political statement or journal actual events is held to a much different standard. Take this example: The depiction is of an actual event, the right person attacking the left. However, the lighting ...


23

Presumably because the people who buy their first DSLRs mostly come from the point-and-shoot world and care about the versatility afforded by the zoom more than about image quality. Also, a 50mm is way too long to be a good "default" lens with an APS-C camera, and good-quality ~30mm lenses are, due to certain quirks of optics, much more complex (and thus ...


23

Essentials I think that all three of the camera types (dSLR, mirrorless, and fixed-lens compact) can be used to seriously learn photography if all you've been using up to now is a phone camera. However, I think that there are three features any camera you choose has to have if you really want to learn photography deeply, and those three features will rule ...


23

Unless somebody frivolously renamed a RAW file, it will never have a file name with the .jpg/.jpeg/.jfif extension. Typical extensions for RAW files will be .raw, .arw (Sony), .dng (Android phones etc.), .nef (Nikon), .cr2 (Canon)... A JPEG file will always have the text JFIF somewhere near the start if opened in a text or hex editor, among the hieroglyphs (...


21

Sure. There's something called a light field camera, or plenoptic camera. It captures a much lower resolution than a normal camera, but it also captures additional information that allows it to be refocused after the fact. And to a very limited degree, dual-pixel RAW in the Canon 5D Mark IV allows refocusing after the fact, but not by very much. That ...


18

The Factors There is an equation, and by convention, it's set up to be really simple. There are basically five factors to consider together: Aperture — the size of the opening which lets light in, Shutter Duration (or shutter speed) — the amount of time the sensor (or film) gets that light, Sensitivity (or ISO, or sometimes "film speed") — how quickly the ...


16

There's been some really excellent answers already but let me provide some additional pointers from a beginner point of view. Learn the technical part. You've bought a DSLR so learn to use it properly. If you were only worried about composition and you're going to shoot on auto then you may as well have bought a point & shoot camera. Learn to expose ...


16

Most of the stuff in those beginner kits is total junk you'll have to replace within a year. Don't fall for it... like I did :/ The only thing in that kit that makes it a 'video kit' is the mic; everything else is the same old rubbish you'd get in a 'photography kit', so I think it's fair to cover it here, rather than force the question over to 'video.se'....


16

Two basic techniques for dealing with reflections on glass should be known, albeit they will only reduce, not totally eliminate them - so for formal product photography, the advice about using an all white or black, uncluttered shooting environment still apply. One is using polarizing filters. In the simplest form, you use one on your camera lens - for more ...


14

This is a great camera with a lot of advantages for a beginner. It's dead simple and very reliable. It doesn't even need a battery, except to meter. And the meter is great — a simple, direct needle which indicates the overall exposure of the whole frame. I find this much more enjoyable to use than the LED indicators used on newer fancier cameras. Combined ...


14

I agree with most of the answers here. At the same time your question is a variation of the very common «How can I make this image pop». Usually what that means is «please increase the contrast». Here is a quick attempt at explaining what that means. Rough list of changes, most of these assume you are using a tool like Lightroom: Increased exposure and ...


14

Traditionally a price factor, but not anymore. The idea that you should shoot only black and white as a beginning "serious" photographer is both highly subjective and highly restrictive, especially in a world where colour comes at no cost. If you are shooting film and doing your own darkroom work, then there is a distinct price advantage to shooting in ...


14

You should shoot with your phone - best way to get better is to shoot more, which is great if you already enjoy it. But you should get a dedicated camera if you're interested. They work differently than phones and will let you learn about stuff like focal length, white balance, aperture and shutter speed and why they matter. My recommendation - buy, ...


14

A lens only focuses on one plane. For normal cameras / lenses the plane is parallel to the film/sensor, so only objects at a particular distance from the lens will be in perfect focus, though things some way in front of and behind that plane will be acceptably sharp. smaller aperture settings (bigger f numbers) increase that range, and larger aperture ...


14

The context changes what is acceptable and what isn't. Nature photographers are expected to photograph nature, not caged animals or taxidermy specimens. Documentary photographers are expected to represent reality as nearly as possible, not to airbrush people out of photos. Contest participants are expected to follow the contest rules. No such restrictions ...


13

I would caution AGAINST a Nikon D7000. I love mine. Love it. It's awesome. It's also more camera than a lot of people will really want or need. The D3000 was a lot cheaper, let me get better lenses as I figured out what to do with them, and had nice little tutorials built in. Perfect for a beginning photographer. As a middle case, take the D5100. An ex-...


13

Just because you buy a zoom lens doesn't mean it is the only lens you are now allowed to use! And just because you are using a zoom lens doesn't mean you can't still alter the composition of your photographs by using your feet! The advice you have been given is primarily a warning not to stand in one place and stop exploring shooting angles and perspectives ...


13

Answer with an image : the guy on the left represents your (vertical) field of view and its image on the sensor is inverted on the right (in other terms, the guy fills your entire image). As you can see in this illustration, the rays of light going through the center of your lens aren't concerned by your aperture settings, they are still getting in, no ...


12

I wouldn't spend any money, unless it is on books, training, or time! If you must spend money, I typically recommend first buying a wide aperture prime lens, but it isn't going to teach you how to take great photography, you already have all of the gear you need to do that. I would recommend putting yourself in an environment full of friends/forums that don'...


12

I think the quality of most of the stuff you are getting in that first kit is dubious. You don't need the UV or FLD filters. The polarising filter is probably a very cheap one. The tabletop tripod and flash look like junk. The wide angle and telephoto "lenses" are not lenses. They are screw-on adapters. They won't give you good quality shots. See more ...


12

Im 13 years old and just starting to get into photography. I trying to find a good instant camera under $100 Your best bet is probably a point-and-shoot digital camera rather than an "instant" camera. That way you're spending more of your money on the part that records the image rather than the part that prints the image, and you don't have to worry about ...


12

Short answer: as the framing is, you cannot achieve this without post-production. If you do not want to use blur-filters in something like Photoshop, you should try to use another framing. The twig on the left is as close to the camera as the leaf is - therefore, when you focus on the leaf, the twig will also be in focus, because the focal plane is just ...


11

You should focus on taking pictures! Don't worry too much about the gear. If you're really interested in this as a hobby, I suggest budgeting a significant chunk right off (See this slightly-tongue-in-cheek article) and buying some decent mid-range gear. I don't mean you need to buy a ton of stuff without knowing what you need, but if you jump in at higher ...


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