50

I think your artistic decisions in this image are fine, and it is a worthy effort, but I also think that is exactly why Shutterstock rejected your image: they don't buy art. I would suggest that Shutterstock is interested in images that can be utilized commercially, where the subject is critical to conveying whatever the client wishes. Should the client wish ...


29

Doing an edge detection, this is where your image is sharp: If I draw a rectangle around it, it is 475x514 pixels, or 244kpx² out of 4600kpx². That's just 5%! Even for a picture with blurred background, my expectation would be more like 30%. An acceptable image (just considering sharpness) could be For the above picture, I still see a lot of room for ...


28

At least as of a few years ago, there was no "algorithm". The only automated reason for a rejection, when I was there, was submitting an identical image to one already on the system. Everything else was done by trained humans. I don't believe it's changed terribly much in the intervening years. This isn't a saleable image by Shutterstock standards, ...


12

Tokihiro Sato, I believe. A site with his work is here: http://photoarts.com/gallery/sato/satoexh.html The specific photograph you're referring to is http://photoarts.com/gallery/sato/87.html


8

File copy is a lossless operation. Disks usually hace CRC checks in place to detect if a sector is corrupted but the act of copying is a 1:1 bit copy, so each copy is exactly identical to the previous. The loss of quality occurs on compression when a file is written from image-data, JPEG encoding discards some information, and even so JPEG supports certain ...


8

The best thing you can do is shoot a photograph of it, crop it, then go to google image search and upload it through clicking the small camera icon. Google will try to find similar pictures hopefully helping you to find the image. I doubt we can help you much beyond that with such a vague description.


8

Great question - one of the shapers of portraiture was Éduard Steichen for a few reasons - He was a very early photographer ~ 1900s onward ~ consequently, he influenced later photographers simply because he was early. He photographed his portrait subjects in context of their fame / reputation / or in context of their work. He was a master of studio ...


8

I don't know anything about the photo but did do a bit of digging on Google. Google Images has an option to search by image that returned the following results: Here This led me to what looks like an art auction website that is in German: Here Finally, the page did not resolve with the pictures, but it did have the alt text visible. Down at the very ...


7

In my opinion you are asking the wrong question. First of all, you shouldn't ask questions of a professional that you would like to hire before taking a look at their portfolio. That is the complete opposite of what I would do. This is a rule, steadfast, true: Let the work speak for itself¹ Does the photographer have an excellent portfolio full of the type ...


6

I could see their point if it was a human rejection - just wanted a bit more of it to be sharp. There's really only a couple of the buds close to being properly sharp. I could see them wanting at least half of the one stalk, at minimum. I'm not seeing any noticeable noise, but the bokeh looks 'edgy'. Perhaps a little chromatic aberration in the bokeh too. It ...


5

What rights do they give for photos? Rights can be a tricky and costly thing depending on how they have their pricing structured. It's often possible to end up spending more on getting copies of photos after the event than you spend on having the photographer at the event. What is provided with the cost? Similar to the previous question. Make sure you ...


5

Here are a few suggestions that will help you for future submissions. Image Caption / Image Title The correct description plays a huge role in the image being accepted or not. An image such as this, needs a caption such as the following, or something to this effect “A single in focus strand of purple lavender against a sea of blurry and out of focus purple ...


4

Frederick Sommer Venus, Jupiter and Mars


4

In general, copyright covers specific expression of an idea, not the idea itself. Also, while law does vary by jurisdiction, international treaties make this aspect, at least, fairly consistent. However, note that in practice, this covers a lot more than you might think. Note that for example specific, distinctive characters can fall under copyright, so, for ...


4

Really fascinating question, I felt compelled to look into it to find out! I'd say there are 3 possible answers to this: The most likely answer: Pentax engraved the first owners name (Masaaki Nakagawa in this case) on the camera before shipping it to them. Evidence suggests that Pentax would sometimes engrave the owners name on a new camera before shipping ...


4

Many early photographers were influenced by conventions in painting that had existed for a few hundred years previous to the invention of photography (this is true of Adams and earlier landscape painting). For example, the photographer Julia Margaret Cameron was influenced by early Italian Renaissance painting as were other photographers from the mid ...


4

"Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Man, The Image & The World" is a great book. Large prints, good quality and a comprehensive selection. Another book to consider is "Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Modern Century" which was printed to accompany the MoMA exhibit by the same name.


3

Just a simple white background, continuous light + flash with softboxes, slow shutter and flash heads synchronized on rear curtain. When the face is visible: flash on the man + background. When body is black: flash only on background. So you get the blur from the slow shutter (+ low continuous light), and you get the shape burned in from the flash. You can ...


3

The Serious Answer I'm going to answer this question under the assumption that you already know your way around a camera, and that you're not trying to learn the skills, but rather are just trying to build up a portfolio and get your name out there. (If this is not the case, find a local photographer and try to become that person's backup shooter. You'll ...


3

I would say it depends on what you are photographing. If you take Joe Buissink for example, he is a wedding photographer and thus the awards tend to have wedding photography as its topic. A list could be this one on wp. Or The Huge List of International Photography Awards and Competitions


3

The photographer is Anthony Goicolea (Wikipedia article). The photo you posted is the sixth in a series of 26 fairy tale characters ("F is for Frog Prince...") (See also partial collection of the fairy tale series on Tumblr). Goicolea is noted for frequently using himself as the subject for the photos (as in this photo; Goicolea is the model).


3

On the focus front, you have a single stalk of blossoms in focus, and many more of the same sort out of focus directly behind the subject; this may have caused either an algorithm or a person tasked to examine far too many new user submissions to tag your photo for focus. Relative to grain, I don't really see any, but the focus issue could lead an algorithm ...


2

It was Wynn Bullock and I think this was the book: Here are a few of the images I remembered:


2

You could try looking on the "iconic photos" blog. I think I know the photo you're talking about and I think it's Jackie Kennedy in the photo (and the airline is Pan-Am). But anyway, check here... at the very least you'll get to browse one of the more interesting photo blogs on the web... http://iconicphotos.wordpress.com/


2

My best guess is that it is an extremely highly lit backdrop with people moving in shadow in front of it with a second or two exposure tops. It feels like there is likely some photo manipulation and masking as well, however it is possible that these could be a result of the well defined areas being in shadow the whole time and the partial exposures still ...


2

From a comment on a discussion thread at photo.net regarding the subject: According to a letter Sander wrote in 1925 to Prof. Dr. Erich Stenger, "I use Zeiss lenses, an orthochromatic plate with corresponding light filter , and clear fine grained glossy paper. I make my photos on 12x161/2 or 13x18 plates, enlarging them to 18x24." quoted on p. 108 ...


2

Robbie Lawrence has likely used multiple cameras and lenses. Based on the Exif info in some photographs, equipment used includes: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Canon EF 50/1.4 USM Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom Macintosh Other pages associated with Robbie Lawrence: Freunde von Freunden: Robbie Lawrence Instagram: robbiel1


2

Let's see what photography is similar to.... while deferring to existing advice. Outdoor sport. Hiking especially. Advice for hikers should apply here. Some similarities to team sport too if we are talking about a hectic reportage situation (constantly in motion). Stage/Rigging work - when doing hard core studio setups. Health and safety advice exists ...


2

I love Robbie's work, so I researched a bit about his gear as well. As someone commented, it could have been any gear! His photography is about narrative as well as aesthetics that light and colors create. He uses all of it to communicate. That said, here are some of my observations Highlights are well controlled, usually underexposed. Looks for warm light, ...


1

Some good general health practices to consider: If you have special health needs, consult an appropriate medical provider. Use medical providers that follow standard medical guidelines. In the United States, the main guidelines are established by the US Preventative Services Taskforce. Recommendations are graded based on supporting evidence. Limit your use ...


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