Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
41

If you shoot from the same position with both lenses, then taking the 35mm lens and cropping it to the same angle of view of the 50mm lens will give you pretty much the same picture, other than the differences in optical quality between the two lenses and the resolution lost to cropping. But even if you were to shoot with the same lens, shooting from a ...


40

Those are done using the compression of a telephoto lens. Longer lenses will magnify the subject, so will make the moon look bigger. It will also make buildings and other objects bigger, but by moving yourself further away from those earthbound objects you can reduce them back to a smaller size. But you can't really get further away from the moon, so it ...


36

Because you are shooting with the camera pointing down, you have convergent verticals. This can be fixed with the perspective tool in your image editor: In theory, you should fix the perspective before you rotate the image to fix the tilt, but when you do it in that order, your have no good reference to fix the perspective, so straightening the horizon ...


29

We're talking about perspective here. How far you are from your subject affects the way your subject's proportions look. Try shooting the same thing with the 18-135, say at 135 mm, but this time forget for a while about filling the frame properly and step back a meter or two (while keeping the same angle). Take the shot, then crop it in software so that it ...


28

The flattening or compression effect is not caused by a particular kind of lens, it applies to all lens in the same way. Actually, this property of lenses applies to our own eyes as well. The factor that affects flattening is the distance from the camera to the subjects. Consider the following exercise: Place two friends 1 meter away from each other. ...


25

There is no hardware solution, short of some crazy* arrangement of mirrors to extend the actual optical distance. That's because perspective distortion solely related to distance, but there might be a software one, if you're able to throw a computer at the problem and able to accept some limitations. For a computational approach, see this paper: Perspective-...


20

The proof is in the pudding – the focal lengths are not exactly the same as yours, but the differences are obvious...


18

I believe the effect has to do with the RATIO of distances from the camera to various parts of the subject / scene. For example, if you take a wide-angle shot of a person's face, their features are exaggerated because the camera-to-nose distance might be half of the camera-to-ear distance. On the other hand, consider the same shot taken with a telephoto ...


18

The easiest way to think of this is with an image. When you use a wider lens, you have to be closer to your subject, which emphasizes the distance between the subject and background by making the background smaller. In contrast, if the camera is far away from the subject, you'll have to zoom much farther to get the same size of subject relative to the ...


16

What you are seeing is the effect of viewfinder magnification. For whatever reason (probably simply to make the numbers sound better), this spec is usually given for a 50mm lens, even on APS-C. The Canon 60D, for example, has a 0.95x magnification with a 50mm lens focused at infinity. And that's why around 50mm gives you the magic double-vision effect. There'...


15

Ever notice when you try to take a photo of a building from the ground, when you aim up to get the entire building into frame, the building appears to taper towards the top? That happens because the camera is tilted vertically upwards. When the camera is held level (in both the vertical and horizontal axes), all vertical and horizontal lines parallel to the ...


14

The key is to find areas of the image with a lot of parallax, such as a foreground building and a background tree. Try to pick a point as close to one edge of frame as possible. Now walk left/right (green) to find the correct point of intersection from the old photograph. Now that you've done that, you've established a straight line to move along (red). ...


14

Thanks to my schwifty skills in Inkscape, the rotation here is slightly off but the following shows exactly what you're comparing. These are the fields of view of a Nikon 35mm (inner) and a Nikon 50mm (outer). So even when you're getting approximately the same stuff in the frame, the 35mm is much wider, focal distances are slightly different too. If you're ...


14

Currently I am taking multiple photos, correcting their perspective, and stitching them together in a very crude way. Yep, that's exactly the way to do it. Good, modern panoramic software should make this less crude. If you use a longer focal length and take many, many pictures, your result will be better — maybe somewhat painful, but you know what they say ...


13

In my career as a VFX supervisor, I've helped supervise several miniature shoots. Shooting miniatures in substitution of a full size scene has been a common technique for almost as long as films have been produced. There are several important steps to make the photograph convincing: Use a small aperture Consider a 1:10 scale model, and put your camera in ...


12

Classic standards have always been more like 2 meters Minimum distance for portraits. 3 meters is common in professional studios, for even better perspective. Too little distance (like 1 meter) will exaggerate and enlarge closer features like noses. This distortion will not please the subjects. The standard notions are the 105 mm lens is good for head and ...


11

It is worth mentioning the 'moon illusion' as well. The moon will look big to the human eye when close to the horizon but it is an illusion - try a photograph and see it 'shrink' to it's proper size. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon_illusion And as a direct answer to your questions, long lens and careful placement of foreground interest.


11

If you want something to look impressive, don't make it a little thing in the middle of a big picture. Frame to make it dominate the picture: This is your picture with much of the distracting fluff cropped out. It let's El Capitan stand out and appear much bigger than in your original. Also keep things out of the picture that compete for dominance. That ...


10

It's all about foreshortening, the effect by which the depth of the scene appears compressed. Different focal lengths just permit you to be different distances from your subject and still give the appropriate framing. Subject distance is the key value here. If you are a kilometre away from your subject, then the tip of their nose is a kilometre away, as are ...


10

What I see there is that the software managed to do affine transformation (change the pitch of the camera), but forgot about lens distortion. Ofcourse, to do a full blown perpective recomputation you need a 3D model of the scene, as affine transformation only models the scene as a plane. So you get to choose, if you want the front wall straight or the back ...


10

Perspective is determined by one thing and one thing only: Subject distance. Period. If you took an image using a rectilinear wide angle lens such as 17mm, which yields a diagonal angle of view of 104° on a full frame/35mm camera and cropped the resulting image so that only the center 3.08333° is in view, you would have the exact same perspective as if you ...


9

Its not quite restricted to large format, but is most common there. Whats going on is that on a large format camera, the front "standard" which holds the lens can move independently of the rear standard, where the film is. What a photographer does to avoid converging verticals is not to tilt the camera upwards, but to shift the front standard so that ...


9

You say: When I select the Perspective tool and click anywhere in the canvas, the grid appears, already scaled to just the subject Emphasis added, because that's important. This is not the normal behavior of the perspective tool. Normally, if you just click, the grid will cover the entire image. It sounds like you have your subject pre-selected. You don'...


9

Perspective is the size relationship of objects. You might say the ratio of size of foreground objects to background objects. Perspective plays a big part when it comes to judging distances to objects. It is a major contributor to our 3D vision. When we change our distance, the size relationships of objects at various distances change. When we change focal ...


8

Actually to avoid distortion the opposite of what you said holds true. Move faces or features you don't want to distort such as fingers away from the edge of the frame Keep the lens parallel to the subject if at all possible Step back and shoot, planning to crop to the desired framing later Consider using the distortion to your advantage for "fun" shots; ...


8

The size of the sun or moon in mm in the sensor plane will be approximately f / 110 where f is your focal length. A typical APS-C sensor is 16mm tall (or 15mm for Canon), hence a 1760mm lens would be required to fill the frame (vertically). 800mm would get you about half the frame, 400mm one quarter etc. A "full frame" sensor is 24mm tall, so you'd need ...


8

It is not about the size of the format, but how the lens moves with respect to the film or sensor plane. This particular case B maintains the 3 planes parallel: Lens, film plane, building. Again, this has nothing to do with the film size. You can google these kinds of lenses for a SLR camera: https://www.google.com.mx/search?q=slr+shift+lens Or some ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible