6

It depends. What legal jurisdiction are you publishing them from as well as in what legal jurisdiction were the photos produced? Laws vary greatly from country to country. What type of place were you at when you took the photos? Was it a public space or private property controlled by someone other than yourself? What is the status of the subjects you ...


5

I'll try to pull together some thoughts for an answer to what really has no definitive solution, I think. First, where you are may make a difference. Familiarize yourself with the laws in your jurisdiction. In the US, with some exceptions, you can photograph anything you can see from public areas where you are normally allowed to be, however even then there ...


3

Have release forms readily available. Make appointment with speak with property manager. Explain your purpose. Ask for permission. Get papers signed. Go take pictures.


3

In the US, taking pictures on private property without the permission of the property owner is illegal. This is why security guards can and will stop you from taking pictures at, say, the Westfield chain of malls. First Amendment rights only apply if you are on public property and your subjects have no reasonable right to privacy. A person in their own ...


2

If you are talking about taking a picture of an existing piece of art — "a framed picture" — the answer in most jurisdictions is probably no. Under the Berne Convention, which covers 172 countries, the creator of a work automatically has copyright over any artwork as soon as it is produced — and that includes creating a derivative work. Taking a photograph ...


2

I am not a lawyer. If you have a serious legal question, consult a lawyer. The following is for entertainment purposes only. The purpose of lawyers is often simply to resolve conflict. It is not really about who is right or wrong. Often, cases are decided based primarily on who has more resources to throw at it. You need to decide whether this is a battle ...


2

Disclaimer. I am not a solicitor, be careful when taking legal advice from random strangers on the internet. Always aim to see advice from a certified legal professional Yes you are right, you are the copyright holder of these photos, and more importantly the intellectual property holder. If you’re self-employed, you usually own the intellectual property ...


2

The following is for entertainment purposes only. If you have any serious legal concerns, consult a lawyer. It is difficult to do anything about this type of situation after the fact. As long as the other person is also not using the images, it may not be worth the effort to restore your use of the images. Unfortunately, you do not have a written record. ...


2

The following is for entertainment purposes only. If you have any serious legal concerns, contact a lawyer. It is difficult to do anything about this type of situation after the fact. Since "stuff has gone down", some time has likely passed. As long as the other person is also not using the images, it may not be worth the effort to restore publication of ...


2

I am not a lawyer. I recommend hiring one. It is a cost of doing business. Client fees should cover both overhead and profits. In terms of interior photographs of a restaurant, the simple solution is to hire people to pose as patrons using ordinary casting methods and standard model releases as recommended by your lawyer. Doing so will avoid ...


1

Unfortunately, consent to having their picture taken is not the same as consent for how the image(s) will be used. And social media/website use could easily be considered marketing/advertising. Luckily for you, the only minor concern in this instance is the tort of "passing off," which would be the misrepresentation of endorsement. But for that to ...


1

I am not a lawyer. In general, you can take pictures of the public in a public place in the UK. The 'right to privacy' is vague, but being out in public & having your photo taken is pretty much how the paparazzi make their living. If you post signs & don't photograph objectors, then you've also got round the 'harassment' law which could otherwise ...


1

Here is a tip to take candid photos. 1) Point the camera at an object of some kind and pretend to take a photo. 2) Point it at your subject and pretend to be checking the photo on the screen. 3) Take the real photo of your subject using live-view whilst pretending to review the images.


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