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120

At the sort of geeky/cosplay events you describe a good solution might be to wear a T-Shirt which addresses the issue. Here's an example I found with a quick search. This should do a few things. To attendees it helps you look like "one of us". It indicates you are relatively serious about your photography, not just a random person with a point and shoot. ...


40

It's not the camera they have to take seriously: it's you. Get past the shyness. You're all fans/reenactors together, you already have an instant bonding point. Appreciate the costume work they've done. You don't have to fake anything. Just be willing to put yourself forward and ask. Show folks what you're doing and get them involved as collaborators in ...


29

I'm going to throw lots of ideas at a wall and make them stick. But changing cameras because it doesn't look the part is wrong. Use what is right for you. Start with an introduction, and offer to show previous work. Whenever I make first contact with a model (granted it's online), I always introduce myself and provide examples. My business cards; each one ...


27

The models are obviously seeking maximum exposure. They'll assume the people with several thousands worth of camera gear on them will be selling/providing the shots to magazines, big blogs, etc. Meanwhile, you with your little point and shoot look like you're adding to your own personal photo album/portfolio. If you are providing these shots to somewhere ...


14

I don't think it's about how people view your camera, it's about how people view you. If you're using an X-T2 and a 55/1.2 lens, it's quite enough for portraiture and the camera is capable of excellent results. However... You describe yourself as "I'm this petite girl with a 'tiny' camera." Think of yourself as a confident woman with a first class camera ...


12

Other than adding a battery grip or flash, you can't really make the camera larger, so it seems to me that your best options are to either prevent your subjects from judging the camera, or challenge their judgement: hide the camera: When you approach someone to ask them to pose, keep the camera out of sight. If you wear the camera on a strap, slide it ...


11

If you want the ultimate in recognition (whether rightly or wrongly) of being the baddest pro at the geekfest, get a couple of friends to be "assistants" and be your "voice activated light stands." Give one a monopod with a speedlight and small modifier on the end and the other a 30-40" reflector set to carry while following you around. And since you'll have ...


9

In France they don't say "cheese", but rather "ouistiti", which is the French for a kind of monkey I believe. These prompts are simply a way to get people's mouths into a "smiling position". How "cheese" or any other word was specifically arrived upon is probably lost to history. Wikipedia has an article listing the equivalent of "say cheese" in different ...


7

Consider using an off-camera flash, with a portable flash modifier. I was helping my Dad take portraits of my mom at a Christmas lights show at night. I put a radio trigger on his, and acted as a voice-activate light stand with a fstopper flash disk on the flash. You'll be amazed how may people think that we're pros, and we got some nicely lit photos to ...


6

We have a couple of existing questions that might help. Take a look at When and how to use a push-on flash diffuser? regarding the plastic caps. They aren't really meant to be diffusers by themselves, since they are so small. Instead, they provide a bare-bulb effect, and if you are in a room with a low white ceiling and walls, the diffusion comes from light ...


5

The truth is that you're not going to get very far without arranging something with someone but there may also be some other limitations other than the initial arrangement. How to get access Phone and ask them. Ask a friend who works there to ask. Email them. Limitations Why do you want to take pictures? Someone is going to ask straight away. If it's ...


5

The options I'm thinking of must have some characteristics. Portable. Easy assembly. Must be attached to the speedlight (does not matter if the speedlight is on the camera or not) Can be held by the photographer with one hand. (off-camera light) Decent size, so it provides a decent diffusion. Wall/Ceiling independent. :o) I have not tested this, but it ...


5

I would suggest you print a few of your best images and show your portfolio to the middle and ask them if they can pose that well? let them see what you can do. I get the same attitude holding a "little " Sony A7r2 with a 55 mm Zeiss lens till they look at my port on my phone or iPad


5

Cosplay as a "professional photographer" Yeah this is going to sound silly, but buy a photography vest, wear a camera backpack. Use a double-sling with a couple of ancient —but huge— DSLRs on. Attach a reflector and monopod to your pack. You'll look like a ridiculous caricature of a photographer, but you'll be unmistakeable as a photographer. Your ...


4

People like their portrait when they are depicted smiling. Uttering words with the long ‘e’ sound does the trick. Watch the birdie and booby and cheese forces us to show our teeth with a smile.


4

If you have a tablet, you could use it to carry a portfolio with samples of your work. A smartphone would work as well, but the screen is a bit too tiny... (and a tablet looks more professional ;) ). A printed portfolio works as well, of course, and allows a larger size, but is bulkier.


4

Get a fake, cheap, big but light plastic camera and carry it around in addition to your actual camera. You'll make a better impression and get more chances to shoot. By the time they realize the bigger camera is fake, you'll be shooting already and they'll be too embarrassed to stop you. Get a lanyard and put some kind of identifying card in it. Make it ...


3

Assuming this is PORTRAIT photography (where you have one on one time with no event distractions): For very natural expressions, the thing I do is aim to make the subject feel SAFE (always). I mean: EMOTIONALLY SAFE. You must demonstrate that you are not judging them and make an effort to understand and appreciate their issues around taking photos. People ...


3

To do this, you'll need each individual to be easily extractable from their background and be able to place them in to another scene. You will want consistent, even and reproducible lighting, so you will need to shoot with only artificial light in a room with no windows (or at night). Any variations in lighting will make it very obvious that the images ...


3

But I'm not sure how timelapse works. A time lapse movie is simply a sequence of photos taken over time, usually at regular intervals. What time frames should I keep? All of them, unless there are reasons to throw some away. For example, if you continue taking photos throughout a day, all night, and into the next day, you might decide to toss the night ...


2

Do as Elliot Erwitt did! (does? He's 92) Carry a bicycle horn in the pocket of your coat. Use it when you need it!


2

I'm shooting a lot with unexperienced models, and to get them more used to a shooting, I try to focus them on something else than the actual shooting. Of course, not every person reacts the same, but talking with them about whatever comes up to your mind and taking shoots while doing that can help them to ease up. Getting them to laugh because something is ...


2

Your question has two aspects, how to prevent people from over-preparing for the shoot, and how to get them to relax during the shoot, so I will address each individually. Preparation: From what you've said, it sounds like your subjects may be feeling a bit pressured into getting the perfect shot. This will cause them to do what makes them feel the most ...


2

If you have problems with getting the full attention of your model: Try to get in a small conversation and also show them your portfolio, if you convince them with your work, than they will not think about the size of your cam.


2

That fstoppers Flash disc Rafael posted looks pretty neat. Another alternative might be a flash bender. If you don't mind carrying a bit more kit for a bigger light, you could go with a monopod + umbrella holder + umbrella softbox. Quite a bit smaller and lighter when packed up than a proper light stand and softbox. Though still a lot larger and heavier (...


2

If you're actually going to go to the trouble of bringing off-camera lighting gear/triggers with you, then maybe a small softbox could be useful in some situations, but you do need to understand its limitations and limited usefulness, and I'd say don't go any smaller than 8". I use a cheap knockoff of the Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite (22cm). But what might ...


2

I believe the use of "cheese" in the phrase is because of the position it puts the subject's mouth in. Mouth the word "cheese" slowly and you will notice that the ending "e" or "uh" sound puts the corners of your mouth in a smile.


2

I was going to write this as a comment but, answers should be answers. It's not your camera. It's your attitude. You need to change your verbiage and be a bit mean. It will make you feel like an ass but it's what's needed. In stead of "Hey can you stand over here so I can get your picture." Just come out the gate with "Stand over there! Big Smile! Thanks!...


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