26

Well, it seems obvious that the film did not advance between shots. Whether that's because of user error (film not installed right so it didn't catch on the advancing mechanism) or a hardware issue with the advance mechanism not working properly can't really be determined without more information and/or inspection of the camera... Try taking a couple shots ...


20

Doing double exposures with the k1000 requires that you cock the shutter using the lever while simultaneously holding down the release on the camera bottom. This allows the shutter to cock while not advancing the film. Check to make sure that this release button isn’t sticking in.


10

Film works by changing when exposed to light. If you have exposed the film to light, then any information it captured will be lost as the film will have been completely over-exposed and washed out. If you did it in complete darkness or, if it's orthochromatic, limited spectrum of light to which the film isn't sensitive (like the red lights in a dark room) ...


5

Like twalberg says, it seems obvious that the film did not advance between shots. Make sure the film advance mechanism is working properly. When you have no film loaded, open the back and check that both the film take-up spool and the sprocket teeth both turn at the same time when you work the film advance lever. The sprocket teeth should turn, even if ...


4

While I agree with Mick's comment - you need to meter or you are wasting film and development costs (which are not insignificant) - I provide the following rough guideline... Fred Parker's Ultimate Exposure Computer suggests that "Night home interiors, average light" meter about EV 5, while "Brightly lit home interiors at night" meter about EV 6. Let's say ...


4

That is the "split screen with microprism collar," and aid for achieving proper focus. Here's a tutorial and video showing how it works. You'll use it to aid in proper focus on your subject. Once you're focused correctly, you can compose your shot however you want. Your subject doesn't need to stay lined up in the circle.


3

Is there any way to fix the hotshot? Hard to say if the hot shoe can be fixed, but it could certainly be replaced. You can find broken K1000's on eBay at very little cost (I saw one lot of four broken K1000's selling for around $30). On the other hand, you can find a working K1000 for just a little more than a broken one (maybe $50-$100), and it might be ...


3

It's not so much a sensor as a mechanical connection — no electronics are involved — but the shutter button has a screw socket for a shutter release. See a video demonstrating this with a K1000 on youtube. The thing you want is called a "cable release" — for example, this one explicitly for Pentax. That one's 20" and $20; you could also go longer and more ...


2

If you've done this in absolute darkness and kept the film in absolute darkness: Yes, absolutely. If it received some light: no.


1

The principle feature of the single lens reflex camera is; The viewfinder view is a near match to the view seen by film or digital sensor. To accomplish a mirror intercepts the rays of light projected by the camera lens and diverts them to a focusing screen. You are viewing the projected image as presented to this screen. Normally a camera projects an upside ...


1

Let's start with a couple of background things. First, make sure you have the basic interrelationship of exposure factors down. Start with What is the relationship between ISO, aperture, and shutter speed? if you're unclear. Since your ISO is fixed when you put the film in, and since we're not gonna mess with flash just yet (I highly recommend experimenting ...


1

F2 is OK but I would shoot at f1.4 with iso 400 (preferably kodak portra or Ilford hp5 for b&w) and use the onboard meter, which takes a lr44 battery. If the camera''s meter doesn't work then you will have to get a handheld meter. I wouldn't use a meter on a phone because they are not accurate, particularly in low-light situations. You can pick up an ...


1

You are likely overestimating the lighting. Typical indoor residential lighting is quite dim. I'd start with something slower than 1/500th. Maybe 1/125th. But ultimately, us internet people don't know your venue so you will want to rely in your in camera light meter or an off camera unit.


1

You can try an adapter like this however it has an element in it so you will be at the mercy of the quality of that element. Or you could opt for one with no element like this however because of the big distance from element to sensor that nikon has you will most likely lose infinite focus (thats what the element corrects. WARNING: various makers used ...


1

You can get a mechanical self-timer that screws into the shutter release button, just like a cable release. I used one like this on my K1000: You lock it with the small red button on the side, then wind it with the metal bit you see on the top. The large red disc is a flag which you rotate around the axis underneath the black button. The farther you rotate ...


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