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17

Fine art paper is usually made using 100% cotton rag content, is most often acid-free and therefore is suitable for archival purposes since it addresses the problem of preserving documents for long periods (see "How Long Will Your Photo Prints Last?" at PhotoShelter Blog for example). It qualifies as matte paper, thought it certainly has a texture, a look ...


8

Short answer: no The two different types of paper with the same mass would only have the same thickness if they had the same density. Photo paper would have a much higher density than card stock, so 300gsm photo paper is actually quite a bit thinner than 300gsm card stock. 300gsm card is actually quite thick: Whereas 300gsm photo paper (shown here: ...


5

Yes, the color gamut of a high end dye printer is generally superior to pigment and pigment ink is generally superior to chemical photo paper. In longevity pigment ink and good archival papers can actually out endure chemical photo paper now as well. In general, you actually see it the most with the depths of black, but when comparing anything pigment to ...


5

I run a print business and have tried a LOT of papers... My favourite by a long way for framing is "semi-gloss" or "Lustre" - which has a slightly textured glossy surface - a bit like old silver-halide "Wedding paper" as I'd call it. The Lustre finish has a slightly more pronounced texture. Dont bother with lamination for a framed picture - it can ...


5

I don't have the reputation to comment, so am adding this bit as an answer. In addition to the answer by @Jahaziel (camera position, lighting) - also check out scanning applications like Genius Scan. The app uses your camera, auto-crops, and then bumps the contrast to clearly show a white page and black writing.


5

Photo paper is ordinary paper coated with light sensitive chemical. These are crystals consisting of silver combined with iodine, or chlorine, or bromine. In their natural state they resemble table salt except the crystal are much smaller. When these crystals are exposed to light, the chemical bonds holding the crystal together weakens. Normally we only ...


5

The images on gelatin-silver film and prints are formed by silver particles. The images on color (chromogenic) film and prints are formed by color dyes. There are also chromogenic black and white films that are developed using the standard C41 color process, but use black and white dyes to form the image. Modern commercial chromogenic and silver-gelatin ...


4

Using the built-in printer paper profiles and allowing the printer to manage color will usually result in very saturated and unrealistic color. This is because you are printing with what is called an unmanaged color process. The way to resolve this is to use the .icc color profiles with an ICM, or Image Color Managed process. Adobe Photoshop, Lightroom and ...


4

ISO (R) is not a speed number, it is log exposure range required to give the full tone (that is, full density range). The higher is the ISO R number, the softer is the paper. ISO R = 160 means density range = 1.6, or log2(10^1.6) = 5.3 stops. You may see it as "paper dynamic range under standard development". ISO R is used because contrast grade is in fact ...


4

As a term, 'photo' paper is fairly useless as an indicator of quality but it usually means that the paper is coated and the coating is engineered to fit certain needs, such as:- controlling or limiting the spread of droplets applied to it holding a higher density of ink than paper (allowing for more dynamic range especially better blacks) protecting the ink ...


4

You need to troubleshoot this, maybe by answering following questions: Check your process protocol. Is the paper that you are using compatible with the developer? is your paper actually black-n-white photographic paper, or maybe it is "photo paper" that is used in inkjet printer? "Photo paper" used for printers is not for darkroom printing/developing, it is ...


4

Here are some differences between paper and film that will affect the image resolution acutance, resolution, and resolving power. Paper: The emulsion normally used for paper is relatively insensitive silver chloride in a colloidal suspension, orthochromatic (blue sensitive), thickly applied to a fibre base with a baryta layer for brightness and a starch ...


4

Let's take a look at the mathematics behind An paper sizing. The aspect ratio is r = w/h where h is the longer side. Now you want e.g. A1 to be half of A0, so the aspect ratio is r=(0.5*h)/w We have the equation r = w/h = 0.5*h/w = 0.5/r or r^2 = 0.5 Then r is simply square root of 0.5 or in other words 0.70711. Thus, the width (shorter side) is 0.70711 ...


3

Ok. This can get to be a very deep topic. But before I tell you what I do, there is a yahoo group called digitalblackandwhitetheprint@yahoogroups.com that you should join, and you also should read a fellow named Paul Roark's website, specifically the page http://www.paulroark.com/BW-Info/. What I do is fairly simple, but the results I get are quite good. I ...


3

Gloss papers are coated to reduce the amount of ink absorbed compared to matte, so the glossy setting on your printer ought to output less ink. On matte paper, using the glossy quality setting, you may have washed out blacks and dull colours.


3

They aren't doing any magic beyond what can be done in Photoshop. You can read yourself in the FAQ: What photo restoration tools do you use to restore my images? Our restoration team is expert in the use of Adobe Photoshop. What training do your photo restoration technicians have? Our artists have been through formal training in color concepts, ...


3

If you're looking to print your own, I can recommend Red River Paper which has papers specifically designed for post cards. They're a company specializing in photo paper, and their post card paper meets postal specs (at least here in the US).


3

I would look at getting them printed at a short-run print/copy specialist such as Prontaprint or Mail Boxes Etc. The print quality will be superior, the card will be just like a commercial postcard, and the cost won't be a great deal more than having to buy in the card and ink yourself.


3

For a really insensitive paper, try blueprint paper photography or diazo paper photography. These sheets are comparatively inexpensive and are available in large sizes. You can even make blueprint paper yourself. See this on the blueprint process. And do post your images!


3

Perception is reality. I'd like to state that the emulsions of different surface-type papers are the same. The dynamic ranges of the emulsions are the same. The only difference is the surface texture. What is different is our perception of the dynamic range. This is due to the "dilution" of the dark areas of the print due to tiny highlights on the irregular ...


3

PIGMENT inks do not suffer from bleeding anywhere near as much as dye inks (as the pigments sit on the surface) The main problem you may face with handmade paper will be the inconsistency of the surface, which could actually reject the ink as well as being very porous in other areas. You MAY be OK (give it a go!) If not, what you need is to coat it with an ...


3

Is it possible in such environment to draw simple shapes on the paper with simple laser pointer? Yes. You might want to start with a green laser pointer, though -- red light is often used in darkrooms as a "safe" light because photographic paper is less sensitive to red light. If not, do you know any kind of cheap light sensitive material, that would ...


3

A freshly opened box of photo paper should not curve upward. Likely the paper has stored under adverse conditions. The only way to use this paper will be to slip it in an easel that shields the borders i.e. makes prints with white borders. Such easel are the mainstay of any darkroom photo lab. If you don't have one, get one.


3

First, do not use regular paper on inkjets. The colors will render poorly and the ink will bleed. Inkjet paper has a special surface coating that causes the ink to instantly dry without soaking in. This also gives rich colors and deep blacks. Some printers have special settings for regular paper which limit the ink. Check the driver settings for that. But ...


2

You could give some of the luster papers from MOAB paper a try. I would specifically recommend their Lasal Photo Luster paper. It has a nice gloss on one side, and matte on the other. The gloss side is really the only side that is intended to be printed on, however if you print any backing on the back side first with a light ink, let that dry, then print ...


2

Actually none of the above! As you wouldn't want to lay a piece of glass right up against any print. With glass, you really want a $5-10 piece of mat board, with a hole cut for viewing the image, between the glass and print, especially with Smooth/Glossy finishes. This means you would probably need one size smaller a print, or one size larger a frame, in ...


2

I've had the most success with a "pearl" or "satin" paper. It is kind of a hybrid between matte and gloss. As far as the picture sticking to the glass, you really want to get it drymounted to something like FoamCore. At our custom frame shop we use Elmer's foam board and spray 3M Super77 on the back of the photo then press it on to the board.


2

When choosing matte photo paper in the print box, the printer uses PHOTO black ink. The ONLY way to get MATTE black in to work is to use one of cannons "fine art" paper selections. I printed test prints on each setting using cannons color profiles each time using matte once and photo rag once. Then used the manufacturers for photo rag and matte photo ...


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