Hot answers tagged

8

Short answer: no The two different types of paper with the same mass would only have the same thickness if they had the same density. Photo paper would have a much higher density than card stock, so 300gsm photo paper is actually quite a bit thinner than 300gsm card stock. 300gsm card is actually quite thick: Whereas 300gsm photo paper (shown here: 300gsm ...


5

Yes, the color gamut of a high end dye printer is generally superior to pigment and pigment ink is generally superior to chemical photo paper. In longevity pigment ink and good archival papers can actually out endure chemical photo paper now as well. In general, you actually see it the most with the depths of black, but when comparing anything pigment to ...


5

ISO (R) is not a speed number, it is log exposure range required to give the full tone (that is, full density range). The higher is the ISO R number, the softer is the paper. ISO R = 160 means density range = 1.6, or log2(10^1.6) = 5.3 stops. You may see it as "paper dynamic range under standard development". ISO R is used because contrast grade is in fact ...


5

I don't have the reputation to comment, so am adding this bit as an answer. In addition to the answer by @Jahaziel (camera position, lighting) - also check out scanning applications like Genius Scan. The app uses your camera, auto-crops, and then bumps the contrast to clearly show a white page and black writing.


5

Photo paper is ordinary paper coated with light sensitive chemical. These are crystals consisting of silver combined with iodine, or chlorine, or bromine. In their natural state they resemble table salt except the crystal are much smaller. When these crystals are exposed to light, the chemical bonds holding the crystal together weakens. Normally we only ...


5

The images on gelatin-silver film and prints are formed by silver particles. The images on color (chromogenic) film and prints are formed by color dyes. There are also chromogenic black and white films that are developed using the standard C41 color process, but use black and white dyes to form the image. Modern commercial chromogenic and silver-gelatin ...


4

As a term, 'photo' paper is fairly useless as an indicator of quality but it usually means that the paper is coated and the coating is engineered to fit certain needs, such as:- controlling or limiting the spread of droplets applied to it holding a higher density of ink than paper (allowing for more dynamic range especially better blacks) protecting the ink ...


4

You need to troubleshoot this, maybe by answering following questions: Check your process protocol. Is the paper that you are using compatible with the developer? is your paper actually black-n-white photographic paper, or maybe it is "photo paper" that is used in inkjet printer? "Photo paper" used for printers is not for darkroom printing/developing, it is ...


4

Here are some differences between paper and film that will affect the image resolution acutance, resolution, and resolving power. Paper: The emulsion normally used for paper is relatively insensitive silver chloride in a colloidal suspension, orthochromatic (blue sensitive), thickly applied to a fibre base with a baryta layer for brightness and a starch ...


4

Let's take a look at the mathematics behind An paper sizing. The aspect ratio is r = w/h where h is the longer side. Now you want e.g. A1 to be half of A0, so the aspect ratio is r=(0.5*h)/w We have the equation r = w/h = 0.5*h/w = 0.5/r or r^2 = 0.5 Then r is simply square root of 0.5 or in other words 0.70711. Thus, the width (shorter side) is 0.70711 ...


3

For a really insensitive paper, try blueprint paper photography or diazo paper photography. These sheets are comparatively inexpensive and are available in large sizes. You can even make blueprint paper yourself. See this on the blueprint process. And do post your images!


3

Perception is reality. I'd like to state that the emulsions of different surface-type papers are the same. The dynamic ranges of the emulsions are the same. The only difference is the surface texture. What is different is our perception of the dynamic range. This is due to the "dilution" of the dark areas of the print due to tiny highlights on the irregular ...


3

PIGMENT inks do not suffer from bleeding anywhere near as much as dye inks (as the pigments sit on the surface) The main problem you may face with handmade paper will be the inconsistency of the surface, which could actually reject the ink as well as being very porous in other areas. You MAY be OK (give it a go!) If not, what you need is to coat it with an ...


3

Ok. This can get to be a very deep topic. But before I tell you what I do, there is a yahoo group called digitalblackandwhitetheprint@yahoogroups.com that you should join, and you also should read a fellow named Paul Roark's website, specifically the page http://www.paulroark.com/BW-Info/. What I do is fairly simple, but the results I get are quite good. I ...


3

Gloss papers are coated to reduce the amount of ink absorbed compared to matte, so the glossy setting on your printer ought to output less ink. On matte paper, using the glossy quality setting, you may have washed out blacks and dull colours.


3

Is it possible in such environment to draw simple shapes on the paper with simple laser pointer? Yes. You might want to start with a green laser pointer, though -- red light is often used in darkrooms as a "safe" light because photographic paper is less sensitive to red light. If not, do you know any kind of cheap light sensitive material, that would ...


3

A freshly opened box of photo paper should not curve upward. Likely the paper has stored under adverse conditions. The only way to use this paper will be to slip it in an easel that shields the borders i.e. makes prints with white borders. Such easel are the mainstay of any darkroom photo lab. If you don't have one, get one.


3

First, do not use regular paper on inkjets. The colors will render poorly and the ink will bleed. Inkjet paper has a special surface coating that causes the ink to instantly dry without soaking in. This also gives rich colors and deep blacks. Some printers have special settings for regular paper which limit the ink. Check the driver settings for that. But ...


3

Cameras of that era accepted film that was slightly larger than the delivered prints. Work was done in a dark-room. Since both the camera film and the print paper were sensitive only to violet and blue light, work was performed under quite bright red light. Red light is void of violet and blue. The film was immersed in a series of chemicals and the results ...


3

Your phone will not generate images with a pixel density of 72ppi... it will generate images with x/y pixel dimensions. What that means in terms of pixels per inch depends on how large it is printed/displayed. E.g. if you use a phone with a 12MP sensor that generates an image of 4000 pixels wide, and you printed that image at 4" wide, it would have a pixel ...


2

Actually none of the above! As you wouldn't want to lay a piece of glass right up against any print. With glass, you really want a $5-10 piece of mat board, with a hole cut for viewing the image, between the glass and print, especially with Smooth/Glossy finishes. This means you would probably need one size smaller a print, or one size larger a frame, in ...


2

Do different types of paper with the same weight necessarily have the same thickness? No. BUT papers with the same "gsm" 'weight' rating do all have the same area for a given weight. While, on reflection, that's an almost trivial statement, it's also more useful and (a little) profound than may at first be obvious. Read on ... In the following text the ...


2

Just to be sure here...you are taking high key film photographs and you are looking for a photographic paper that will bring out detail in the upper highlight range? Something you will be exposing via either contact print or enlarger? I ask, because film can also be drum scanned and the digital file printed via ink jet...and when it comes to ink jet papers, ...


2

When choosing matte photo paper in the print box, the printer uses PHOTO black ink. The ONLY way to get MATTE black in to work is to use one of cannons "fine art" paper selections. I printed test prints on each setting using cannons color profiles each time using matte once and photo rag once. Then used the manufacturers for photo rag and matte photo ...


2

In short, no, they are not always compatible. I have had photo papers (Kodak I think) that actually rejected Epson pigment (Ultrachrome) inks (it sat on the surface and refused to dry properly. I have also seen certain dye inks leech under the surface of glossy photo papers leaving (in one case) a magenta halo. Pigment inks tend to leave a matte finish on ...


2

inkAID is specifically made for random types of paper and other materials. http://www.inkaid1.com/inkaid-white-matte-precoating


2

The answer is "yes, but it's complicated." Film and paper developers are fundamentally the same thing, but they're formulated a bit differently. The usual Kodak product for developing black-and-white paper is Dektol. It can be used to develop film, but because papers are less sensitive, the mix recommended on the package ends up being a lot stronger than ...


2

To obtain an almost scanner-like image with minimal set up I'd locate two lamps either side of the paper. And then while taking the photo, locate the lens of the phone/tablet directly towards the center of the sheet. That is, if you place the sheet of paper flat on a table, the lens must be directly above the center of the page. The wide angle lens in most ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible