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2

The starters the easiest is simply to assemble images into a video. This will already give you a time-lapse. Any tool that can create a video from images can do this. ffmpeg is a popular free utility with lots of options but will give you something without much trouble. See this SuperUser question for details and other options. The second level is to align ...


3

Here's the problem. You want to show something that is close to being on either side of you (the trees in the row closest to the road) and display that on a flat display medium (screen or print, it doesn't matter) that is in front of you sufficiently that the extreme edges of the image are not on either side of you. Short of displaying the result on a ...


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What you need it to render the panorama using a rectilinear projection. This is limited to scenes that span less than 180° but since those trees are 90° appart can do it, but will need more photos that cover the space between those trees. With the frames you have, if you project as rectilinear, the panorama will have a ⋂ shape with trees on both sides but ...


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Don't know how this would apply to using multiple cameras for video, but these types of stitching errors tend to occur with parallax or camera movement in space between member shots. Parallax is more easily corrected in stitching with more overlap, but when you've got less, there's not much you can do. With stills, you need to determine the no-parallax point ...


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The most robust solution I've found to work is to download exiftool and remove all EXIF data. Facebook won't have the the date and time then anymore (it will use the time of upload) so you'd have to set that manually. I suppose you can try to only remove all the fields related to the resolution and dimensions. exiftool -all= <your_image>


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