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The basics is that you start with a 360-degree panorama and apply a rectangular to polar transformation. I happen to have written introductory tutorials for both: How to Make a Panorama - For this you need a panorama software such as those reviewed there. The free ones do an excellent job, so I suggest you start with those How to Make a Wee Planet - This ...


21

There are actually two common types of "little planet" images: polar and stereographic. The example image here is polar, the Flickr group images are both, and the one asked about in the linked "duplicate" post, How to do 360 polar pano in photography? is a stereographic "little sky". They have different requirements and techniques, but both typically begin ...


15

Using Hugin Yes, since Google PhotoSphere panos are stored as equirectangular projections you can use Hugin to remap to other projections. Go into the View → Advanced (or Expert) mode. Click the Add Images... button to load the stitched panorama. Set the Lens type to Equirectangular and the HFOV to 360. This will load your 360x180 as a 360x180. ...


6

You can try to add images into Hugin and calculate) coordinates of images (or move them in OpenGl preview by hand), six faces will differ Yaw (0,60,120,180,240,300), top and bottom will have Pitch +90 and -90 , and then you must figure right projection (switch objectives) and hfov to "fill the frame". Then you can render it. I have successfully used this ...


5

ImageMagick can't do this—it doesn't do projection remapping. But there are a number of other tools that do. I'm pretty sure that Hugin or panoramas tools scripting or Gimp and Mathmap could get you there, but I'm lazy so I paid for a license for a commercial application called Pano2VR. Pano2VR can remap equirectangulars to cube faces. Because the ...


4

To get a good spherical view, you have to cover the entire sphere. Your panorama doesn't have 360° coverage in yaw--you didn't shoot the whole circle all the way around. Having a panorama that's 2:1 isn't enough by itself to do this magic. The 2:1 aspect ratio is merely the outcome of a 360°x180° (full spherical view) panorama that's been ...


3

You don't have sufficient scene coverage for an equirectangular. 360x180 coverage means you took enough photos and stitched to cover the entire sphere. If you didn't point your camera straight up and straight down at any point to take a member image, you have no coverage of the zenith (top) and nadir (bottom) of the sphere, which is why those areas are black ...


2

I really wish you could post at least a downgraded, blurred version of your images. If I understand you correctly, you could use a 3D modeling tool, such as Blender to texture up a simple hexagonal prism mesh that matches your images. Then using a properly aligned camera you could create the overlap images, and then you could use a stitching program.


2

The PTAssembler link below explains a lot about those projections. It specifically answers the question you asked ... Why use the different projects? http://www.tawbaware.com/projections.htm Actually, as you'll see, PTAssembler has those variations so that you can get the control you want. Think of it as, what a DSLR is to a Point-and-Shoot. Max Lyons ...


2

Check that your camera is level in pitch and roll. These types of issues happen when you shift the orientation/location of the camera between shots. The bumps typically happen at the seams between member images, and the changed orientation caused misalignment. Do not rely on a level on a tripod, especially if you're using a ballhead, as that typically ...


2

You can't just mess with the metadata; you have to actually remap the image. Flickr's panorama interactive viewer can only be used with equirectangular 360x180 panoramas. And to make it interactive on Flickr only requires adding the "equirectangular" tag (unlike Facebook, where you have to set the metadata). But, the image does have to be an actual ...


2

If you're trying to remap six cube faces back to an equirectangular, the easiest way to do it is with the commercial software package, Pano2VR. Pano2VR lets you feed it six cube face images individually, or in a t-cross format, and will transform it into an equirectangular and vice versa. If you're looking for an open source command-line way to do this, ...


1

The only way to get the cube faces is to cover the cube by shooting a spherical 360ºx180º pano, first. This is non-trivial. See: How are virtual tour photos taken? There are cameras that can create this type of image in a single shot (e.g., Ricoh Theta), but the image quality and resolution of these types of cameras tends to be very low and you have no ...


1

The first image is posted in a dedicated Equirectangular group, featuring such images. In the discussion section of that group this has been discussed here and here for example. The bottom line is that the flickr viewer (and probably most other viewer, too) needs exif data like that: FullPanoHeightPixels = 6000 FullPanoWidthPixels = 3000 ProjectionType=...


1

The height of the area is 15 meters. Ideally, I'd like to create the final image so that it doesn't distort towards the top of the image. Shoot from a platform that is about 7.5 meters high so that the camera can be pointed parallel to the ground and perpendicular to the face of the building.


1

What you know is the field-of-view. Any 4 images in a row covers exactly 360 degrees with no overlap, unlike the source images to produce the original stitched panorama. So 4 images covering 360 means that image has 90 degree angle of view horizontally and vertically. The diagonal angle of view can be deduced by the Pythagoras Theorem to be just over 127°. ...


1

Are you using LR CC? Have you tried boundary warp? *edit I think the wavy lines are caused by distortion from your lens before the photos are stitched. Do you apply lens corrections to the images before stitching in LR?


1

You can also use PtEditor. You can extract a rectangular image and inject it back, although getting your hands on pteditor is no easy job. http://www.photocreations.ca/panotools/ So far i found it here but does not have the pano12.dll


1

The input file (pano.tif above) needs to be a full, spherical panorama, as indicated by 'f4' and the 2:1 aspect ratio. Each cube face will be a rectilinear panorama, as indicated by 'f0' above. The field of view for the face should probably be 90 degrees, rather than 100 as selected by 'v100' above. Here is a shell script from MacOS with Hugin installed: #...


1

Pano2VR or Flexify are probably your simplest solution, but if you're a scripting geek and have to use Hugin tools, then scripting nona commands is the way to go. Since the panoguides board went down in sea of spam, I go to the Internet archives and post DorinDXN's answer (with some minor edits) of a Windows .bat file to create six nona_gui scripts and run ...


1

Which projections are useful to you depends a lot on what type of panoramas you're making, the image itself, and how you want to present the pano. That list is pretty standard for any Panorama Tools-based GUI (that's where the PT in PTGui, PTAssembler, PTLens, etc. comes from). I'd say take a spin through this Hugin manual page on projections to get a ...


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