10

I have an Olympus body (E-PL1) and a Panasonic lens (100-300mm zoom), and haven't noticed any special problems. It feels kind of silly to have 'paid' for in-lens stabilization that I keep turned off, but even when I've accidentally knocked the switch into the on position, it doesn't ruin the average shot (it makes for odd effects during long exposures on a ...


8

Don't worry — the RAW files are the full resolution. They contain all of the data recorded by the camera. The option to change resolution is grayed out because there's no in-camera way to reduce it, not because it is stuck on small. However, for that data to be viewed, it need to be interpreted. See What does an unprocessed RAW file look like? for more on ...


7

So let me get this straight. You have a small, light weight camera that can use a good selection of lenses, and you are thinking of changing systems. You like the camera, it weighs less with a lens on than a Nikon DSLR does without. If you are travelling, the weight is not going to dig into you back. My questions are why change? Have you reached the ...


6

Most P&S I have used does amazing jobs with the built-in presets (Scene modes)! Though most people think the presets are targeted towards amateurs, but trust me they are not! The companies have invested heavy amount of research and money to configure these presets often using real life feedback from very experienced photographers. So I'd not ...


6

The E is a regional suffix. You point to the Australian Panasonic site but on the Canadian one for example, there is no version with the E. Quite commonly the E letter is for Europe and the product is almost always identical except that it may have been certified by a different set of standards.


6

Can you do shutter button half-press to focus? That is usually an easy workaround. Just focus on a simple object with the same exact distance, half-press the shutter button, then recompose (keep the button half-pressed, target the camera on the mirror), then press the button fully. Usually works with most cameras... Another way is to put a non-...


6

Hate to say it, but you're unicorn-hunting. There is no such beast. Understand that you're shooting a camera with a 2x crop factor. So, a "normal" lens is 25mm. And if you're looking at all classic film-era lenses to adapt to your camera, you're also looking at lenses from an age when 24mm was an exotic super-wide lens. And when f/2.8 was pretty much the ...


6

You ask for any advice, so I'm going to provide that. Your built-in flash seems like it's broken. So, you should ignore it and get a shoe-mount flash, since your camera comes with a standard hot shoe. This comes with several advantages, including significantly increased power, and (with most flashes) the ability to bounce the light off of the ceiling instead ...


5

Almost all these systems work in a similar way, be it iDynamic (Panasonic), DRO (Sony), Adaptive D-Lighting (Nikon), HTP (Canon), etc. What they do is adjust the exposure so that to capture more details in the highlights. This causes under-exposure in the shadow areas which the camera compensates for by boosting levels there which reveals the downside of ...


5

From the Exif Info, The normal photo has exposure 1/60s, ISO 80 and f4.9 without flash, focal length 13.6mm. The purple one has exposure 1/60s, ISO 1000 and f5.9 with flash, focal length 33mm. This picture should have been overexposed by at least 3 stops + flash if you had taken it with the same lighting as the normal picture. Its possible that the ...


5

As it happens Stack Exchange gave me a chance to try it out, with the (no longer active) Gear Grant Program. I rented an OM-D EM-5 body and the lens for a couple of weeks, and took it with me everywhere. My first impression was slight disappointment — although it's a mix of metal and plastic construction, it feels much more plasticky than Pentax's "Limited" ...


5

iResolution is just an edge enhancement filter. The "i" part in the name implies, like Panasonic's other "i" features, that the camera automatically controls when, and how much, it should apply this feature. What you select is just the maximum amount by which it will do that - it doesn't mean the camera will use it for every shot. Instead it will ...


5

The FZ1000 tolerates no more than 24V on the trigger contact (with positive on center). Many vintage flashes may deliver 300V or more. For TTL operation use one of the following: - Olympus FL36 or FL50 (that can be found used on ebay) - Nissin I40 - Metz 44AF (or more powerfull, see compatibility list on Metz website) Meike is known not to work properly ...


5

You can use any filters on any lens if they are the same size, with some caveats. Very few lenses have male filter threads instead of the usual female filter threads. I think the Fuji X100 series of cameras are like this, but don't quote me on that. In this case you either need special filters or an adapter. Some wide angle lenses will vignette with the ...


5

I have had a similar issue in Auto mode with my GX80. I had somehow adjusted the exposure compensation so all images were under exposed. Setting the exposure compensation to zero solved this problem!


4

My Oly EPL2 works well with my Panasonic 20mm f/1.7 prime. No quirks at all. The autofocus and image quality work precisely as one would expect. I can't say on the 25 mm f/1.4, but there seems to be a good ethic of m43 interoperability.


4

Reduction of light transmission. The specific amount depends on the specific design. An additional set of refracting elements in the light path, thus an additional distortion / aberration / Image Quality reduction factor. Observable decrease in sharpness at high contrast edges within image. In the case of add-on extenders specifically: Dust between the main ...


4

So, you're right: you're foiled because the Lumix FZ18 isn't an interchangeable lens camera. The adapter you link for is for Panasonic's Micro-Four thirds cameras, like the Lumix GF1, which do use interchangeable lenses. It kind of confusing for Panasonic to use the same branding for both those cameras and their attached-lens models, but there it is. The ...


4

The Panasonic Lumix G 20mm F/1.7 ASPH is better. As its name says, it has a maximum aperture of F/1.7 compared to a maximum of F/3.5 at wide-angle for either currently available 14-42mm lenses. This means the 20mm lets in more than 4X more light and will let you shoot with less light or with the same amount of light at a lower ISO or faster shutter-speed or ...


4

In general, lens based optical stabilisation ought to work very well with a 150mm lens. Modern designs are capable of three stops (8x increase in exposure time) or more. As to whether it will make a large difference to what you can shoot, that depends on how much light you have. Of course image stabilisation does nothing to help you with moving subjects, so ...


4

Shading Compensation is normally called Vignetting Correction. It simply corrects for a known falloff in light intensity towards the edges of the frame. The cameras has to know the lens attached; otherwise it won't work, which is why you sometimes need a firmware upgrade when newer lenses become available. Vignetting is one of the easiest and least ...


4

This is unfortunately the expected behavior for the camera you purchased. It is an extremely basic model with a very limited ISO range for the sensor and a fairly slow lens for the size. It's really more designed for taking daytime and well lit photos and is basically the equivalent of a cheap camera phone, but with a very basic lens put on it to give it ...


4

Today's compact cameras are technical marvels, and the image quality you can get from them is outstanding — provided you set your expectations appropriately. Your particular camera is about the size of deck of playing cards, yet includes a lens that zooms from almost ultra-wide angle to decent telephoto. And, the low-light quality will easily exceed what you ...


4

DMC stands for "Digital Media Camera" although a panasonic dealer told me it means "Digital Still Camera"


4

The cameras are very different in technology and design, so the basic answer is "it depends". There are two fundamental differences.... maybe three. Let's call it three: Your Canon 1000D is an interchangeable lens camera. You may only have one lens (and if so, probably a 18-55mm "kit zoom"), but you have the option of adding literally hundreds of other ...


3

A front mounted wide converter will most likely reduce image quality by introducing new elements into the optical path, increasing the change of flare, as well as increasing the amount of refraction occurring which will result reduced corner sharpness and more distortion/aberrations (unless the adaptor is very well corrected). A front mounted wide converter ...


3

The Panasonic DMC-ZS7 / TZ10 has a sports mode. You could try that. You could also try Aperture Priority AE mode, select the largest aperture possible at the focal length you choose(F3.3 - 4.9). You could also adjust the ISO sensitivity higher, but not too high that the amount of noise or grain is too much for you. A high value would be ISO 800 or 1600, but ...


3

The image quality of a 4/3 and Micro Four-Thirds camera is exactly the same since the sensors are the same size. Therefore you can expect better image quality from newer 3/4 or Micro 4/3 cameras due to technological improvements. It is normal that there will be differences when changing models and even though what you are getting will be some kind of ...


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