31

Your camera is almost certainly applying lens correction for geometric distortion to the JPEG images. This results in the edges of the widest angle images being cropped slightly to correct the barrel distortion most zoom lenses demonstrate at the wide end. The 8.8-175mm (24-480mm FF equivalent) wide focal length ratio zoom lens of your Panasonic FZ2000 ...


7

I will present the "quick and dirty" version of my answer, because I could talk on this topic for pages and pages. Essentially the 14mm f/2.5 "pancake" is a prime lens, which means it does not zoom, it has one fixed focal length. So instead of zooming in and out to frame your subject, you have to move your feet along with the camera! The fixed focal length ...


7

Actually, shooting with a compact camera rather than an SLR is part of the problem. Basically, shooting a game at night means that you don't have enough light for decent exposure times. As a consequence, your exposures are long and the moving objects are blurred. The field's lighting are rarely enough to allow you to capture moving subjects with ISO low ...


7

The answer is probably more profane than you think: Instead of developing a real sophisticated algorithm to get the best resolution out of the source image, the software developers went the "safe" way: add enough crop that will always and under all circumstances deliver an image that is "properly cropped" (whatever that means). I'm saying this as a ...


5

iResolution is just an edge enhancement filter. The "i" part in the name implies, like Panasonic's other "i" features, that the camera automatically controls when, and how much, it should apply this feature. What you select is just the maximum amount by which it will do that - it doesn't mean the camera will use it for every shot. Instead it will ...


5

More image information? Yes. Better image quality? No. The parts being truncated don't scale well because of the rectangular pattern of your sensor's pixel wells versus the curved shape of the correction. So a lot of artifacts can show up in those areas. Like many products intended for mainstream consumption (as opposed to niche products used by experts in ...


5

The FZ1000 tolerates no more than 24V on the trigger contact (with positive on center). Many vintage flashes may deliver 300V or more. For TTL operation use one of the following: - Olympus FL36 or FL50 (that can be found used on ebay) - Nissin I40 - Metz 44AF (or more powerfull, see compatibility list on Metz website) Meike is known not to work properly ...


5

You need better, fuller spectrum light. And you need more of it. The issues you have with your images are due to poor lighting, under exposure, and the resulting high noise.


5

You can use any filters on any lens if they are the same size, with some caveats. Very few lenses have male filter threads instead of the usual female filter threads. I think the Fuji X100 series of cameras are like this, but don't quote me on that. In this case you either need special filters or an adapter. Some wide angle lenses will vignette with the ...


5

These are called "Zebra stripes" and basically warn you that using the current settings, the area they cover is going to be exposed over a certain threshold. This threshold is usually 100% (which means "clipped to white"), but this camera actually allows you to customise the levels - documented on page 220 of the user manual. In this example, since exposure ...


4

So, you're right: you're foiled because the Lumix FZ18 isn't an interchangeable lens camera. The adapter you link for is for Panasonic's Micro-Four thirds cameras, like the Lumix GF1, which do use interchangeable lenses. It kind of confusing for Panasonic to use the same branding for both those cameras and their attached-lens models, but there it is. The ...


4

I have a G3, and have really enjoyed using my 3 Pentax K mount lenses with it. Apart from the physical adapter, you will also need to tell the camera to "Shoot without lens" in the REC menu. Apart from the cost savings, you will also get benefits from those old lenses. They are mechanically much more solid, and also (at least for primes) even if you give you ...


4

The cameras are very different in technology and design, so the basic answer is "it depends". There are two fundamental differences.... maybe three. Let's call it three: Your Canon 1000D is an interchangeable lens camera. You may only have one lens (and if so, probably a 18-55mm "kit zoom"), but you have the option of adding literally hundreds of other ...


4

There is a limit to what the camera can measure. When it is so dark, the camera cannot meter and cannot focus since there is nothing to focus on for an aurora. Autofocus requires contrast and what you are trying to shoot has very little of it. This is the right time to shoot in Manual Exposure mode with Manual Focus. You will have to try a few settings to ...


4

It means "2nd generation", or "2nd version". Cf. Canon's use of "Mk II" on camera bodies.


4

You're the victim of typical indoor light and small sensor. It's darker indoors than what you think. The DC-FZ82 has a crop factor of 5.6. To put this into context, even entry-level DSLRs and mirrorless cameras have a crop factor of 1.5 - 1.6, and professionals use cameras with crop factor 1 (or even smaller than 1!). The amount of light collected is ...


3

According to the manual(pdf), page 59 it can be shown with the [VERSION DISP.] option from the Setup menu. The latest version of all body and lens firmwares can be found on Panasonic's Joint update service for Four Thirds lenses page.


3

From my experience with point-n-shoot cameras shooting sunsets/sunrises I would say the problem is in overexposure. When you try to catch more of what's in front of you the automatic exposure measuring happens on this dark foreground and leads to too bright sky and that really eats out the colors. There is two easy ways to counteract for this. Composition: ...


3

TL;DR: Get some YN-560III or YN-560IV flashes and a YN-560-TX, if you're sure Yongnuo's what you want. You don't need to mod; just avoid the RF-603 (Mark I) triggers First off, posts that say you have to modify Yongnuo gear are probably old and only about the Yongnuo RF-603 (Mark I) radio triggers. They're transceivers. These triggers auto-sense whether ...


3

The GH4 still trumps the GX8 for serious video work - you've noted the lack of headphone socket on the GX8 which is definitely important, but the DPReview preview notes a couple of potentially even bigger differences: Unlike the video-focused GH4, the GX8 doesn't offer 10-bit HDMI output and can't output video over HDMI at all while recording. If what ...


3

This is working by design. In iA ("intelligent automatic") mode with flash enabled, Panasonic cameras attempt to balance ambient light with flash — dragging the shutter. And from what I've seen elsewhere, it tends to be pretty aggressive with this, resulting in shutter speeds like what you're seeing. So, unless your subject is static or there is a lot of ...


3

Most cameras are set up by default in one mode or another to assume that you wish to use the flash as fill or to illuminate your subject only while the rest of the scene is properly exposed by the available ambient light. Your Panasonic GH4 behaves this way in iA mode. Most other cameras do this when set to Av/A mode. Many cameras have menu options that ...


3

On any iso-compatible flash or camera hotshoe, the sync signal--the one that fires the flash in sync with the shutter opening on the camera--is communicated by the pin in the center of the "square" of the hotshoe/foot. So, to fire a flash correctly, you can use any ISO-compatible flash. It just has to have that square layout, use the rails as ground, and ...


3

I don't know if I can set the camera's focus to infinity to avoid the blurring effect when I don't want. For example, when I want to take a picture that both background and subject is clear. Currently I can only choose, blur background or blur subject. The thing you're trying to control is called depth of field, which refers to the range within which ...


3

You are correct in assuming that is uses the time to match to the photos. The accuracy will be determined by how often you set the app to log your location, so if you need high accuracy without running your battery down really quick (i.e. by logging too often) just use the Log now option whenever you take the camera out to take a photo, this will save the ...


3

I reckon it's taken enough of a knock that the either the connection from the camera to the card socket has been damaged, or the pins that connect the socket to the card. Neither is easy to repair, even once you get inside the camera. And you can't really tell the difference from outside the camera because the symptoms are the same. I'd attempt a repair on ...


3

This is a limitation of the electronic shutter used in your camera. Actually, it is a limitation of nearly all electronic shutters, some brands cap it at just 1/60s, some more, such as Panasonic with a 1s cap. It probably depends on the generation and these things are relatively new and bound to improve in future digital cameras. A mechanical shutter is a ...


3

In the Panasonic GX85 user manual, page 193: In the MENU → [REC] → [Quality] menu, select RAW + JPEG (it looks like RAW next to a stack of 3 or 6 boxes).


3

With the Panasonic camera (if you have a tablet or smart phone) you could download imageapp https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.panasonic.avc.cng.imageapp&hl=en_GB which allows remote access/control to the camera


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