17

Because they can. That is perhaps the only true answer to your question. As to why they would want to, just follow the money: In the age of digital reproduction an unauthorized copy of a work of art can have a significant impact on sales of authorized prints or books that generate revenue for the gallery, artist, or owner of the piece. If the piece is part ...


11

The gear actually isn't as important in your situation as the workflow to preserve color accuracy. The main issues you'll need to consider are: Accurate white balancing when shooting. This typically involves shooting in RAW format (so you need a camera that shoots in RAW) with some type of color reference in the frame--something like a WhiBal or ...


11

The actual reason vary from place to place but I guess common reasons are: Because they want you to buy a print in the gift shop Light from a flash can actually degrade the painting (this may be a myth, I don't have the expertize to decide based on the evidence) They don't want people standing in front of the painting too long and blocking the passage It ...


11

One key reason is that the museum may not own the piece, and therefore, only have the right to exhibit the piece. They can not transfer the right to reproduce or allow a piece to be reproduced, because that would cause them legal issues. This is especially true in museums that are exhibiting pieces that are not part of their collection. As others have said,...


11

An elaborate copy setup would have rotatable polarizing gel filters on both lamps as well as a circular polarizing filter mounted on the camera lens. Before you take any of these steps, suspend a white bed sheet in front of the painting. Cut a peep hole for the camera; illuminate the painting thru the bed sheet. The idea is totally diffused light.


10

Making a worthy copy of art work is one of photography’s most challenging tasks. You will find that pleasing the artist is next to impossible. This is because he/she will have both the original and your copy side-by-side. The reason this is arduous is because the photographic process optimizes skin tones and certain so called “memory” colors. Artist tends to ...


9

Probably not. Color filters can be useful when you want to get a certain look in a black and white photograph, but usually don't enhance color. That's because they are inherently restrictive — they subtract colors from the scene. Probably what you need is a) better lighting on the painting and b) to shoot in Raw so you can make careful adjustments to bring ...


8

I used to work as an assistant to a guy who shot accessions for the Corcoran Gallery in DC. He used a standard copy photography lighting technique with two Lowell D (now DP) hot lights reflected out of 60" silver umbrellas placed at 45° angles to the art on each side of the camera with their throw pattern overlapping a bit for greater evenness across the ...


6

As Matt Grum nicely proposed, warm tones are the key elements in the "soft painting" look of this beautiful photo. Indeed, if you revert the "bump" in reds and greens, the picture would look like (with auto white balance and levels in photoshop) : If you look carefully, you can discover another element which contributes to the painting-like effect, for ...


5

Some general recommendations. 1) The resolution of the file. You need at least 150 ppi for this. At 3 ft you need 3x12x150=5400px on the long side. So you need a 24Mpx file at least. (The explanation on why 150ppi is out of the scope of this question) 2) You want a sharp lens. Try a Prime lens for this. The longer focal length the better because you ...


4

Almost all museums don't allow flash photography because flashes will may cause damage to the work over time if UV is not properly filtered. As far as non-flash photography, a great many museums are totally fine with it, including many of the best. The Louvre in Paris and the Smithsonian in DC both allow photography of anything in their exhibits. Those ...


4

It sounds like you want to avoid directional lighting, and utilize more ambient light. If you have control over lighting in the room, you could skip using the soft boxes and just increase the ambient. Otherwise, you could try bouncing the soft boxes off walls/ceilings (i.e. not pointed at the painting) to increase their apparent size, which will approximate ...


3

I collect old cameras and have used various cheap methods to cover up scuffs and fill in small dings. These have ranged from Simple Markers as suggested by yourself to using car touch up paint. Several coats of that stuff often fills in very well and gives a good finish. Another way that I have used, and quite possibly the best results, was Epoxy Based ...


3

That wear on the camera edges is called "brassing", and it's usually considered to be a badge of honour for a camera. It means the camera has led a productive life of being used, which is exactly what it was designed to do. Although you've asked how to fix it, I'll offer you an alternative: leave it as it is. It doesn't affect camera function, and in the ...


3

Conceptually you need to boost the reds and greens to produce a very warm overall tone. There are dozens of ways to do this, the main ones would be: White balance during RAW conversion Colour balance tool in Photoshop Photo filter tool in Photoshop Curves tool in Photoshop


3

I'd recommend getting a colour swatch such as the X-Rite Color Checker Passport. If you take a photo of your painting with the device in shot, this acts as a reference for all other photos taken with the same lens and lighting conditions, and ensures the colours are as accurate as possible. The device comes with a stand-alone application and a Lightroom ...


3

Unless you just mean the overall yellow/brown tone, no, you can't do this by adding a filter. You need three things: a model, setup, and lighting. "A model" might seem obvious, but: posing like this isn't innate. It takes skill and practice. You probably need to hire a professional model — or else someone you work well with and a lot of patience. By setup,...


3

If you don't have access to retake the photo using better lighting techniques, one method that might work with an existing photograph is frequency separation. It is often used when touching up portraits. Frequency separation is basically a way of separating the texture/details in the area of an image from the colors in the same area. You could use frequency ...


2

The Palette Knife tool with a fairly large size, medium detail and softness should generate a very impressionist look. You can additionally apply an oil paint filter before or after and it may augment the look. You can find it in the Artistic section in the filter gallery in Photoshop CS6.


2

A flexible tripod with a level from a good brand A platform with two/three steps for shooting the artwork from an appropriate level (you may need, sometime) Consult the curator whether they will allow you to use a flash or not. Because in some art studios, it's strictly forbidden to use flash during taking a photo. If they allow using flash, get a ETTL flash ...


2

I shoot artwork regularly with my Nikon D300, i use a Nikon 50mm 1.4f on arounf 10f, 2x studio flashes, a tripod, and a colour chart. mount the artwork directly in front of the camera, 90 degrees in all directions. always shoot raw, and use a circular polarising filter. IF the artwork is oil, you may need to experiment with flash/ light positioning to ...


2

Filters will definitely help, contrary to the other answers. Let me explain this (and I assume that you shoot in RAW. the only proper way to go.) Let's say you have an average RGB value of (95%, 25%, 10%) through the entire picture. This is basically a heavy red color cast over the image. Now, RED is being digitized using the ~95-100% of the dynamic range ...


2

The problem is most likely white balance. Your camera can't tell the different between a grey painting in red light and a red painting in white light. If it sees a lot of red, it'll probably assume it's in red-ish light and will "correct" away some of the redness. A simple solution is to photograph a piece of white paper or plastic (make sure it really is ...


2

I've been reading (and really appreciating) the Q/A's on this site for quite awhile now, but this is my first foray into making a comment - so please forgive me if I'm off track. You asked "How can I create something like it with Gimp, Photoshop or any other laptop application?". I'm not sure if you are asking about the technical side of how the ...


2

All the other answers are correct. However there is one aspect missing: Don't expect more than what is technically possible Art is the single most demanding type of photography because it asks for colour accuracy. More often than not it is impossible to create a colour-correct print of an artwork. The reason is simple: The colours that Artists use are ...


2

I simply remove the dust from the equipment and then use a couple of applications of a black permanent marker and covering it with ArmorAll protectant (sprayed on a soft cloth) over the entire camera and/or battery grip. You'll never notice the scuffs or brassing and the protectant leaves a pleasing appearance. It's an easy thing to do, you aren't going to ...


2

It's possible to make a copy and may not even require any artistic skill or experience as a painter. It may just depend on your hardware. In the movie, Tim's Vermeer (see: trailer on Youtube), Tim Jenison is obsessed with Vermeer, and whether or not he used optical devices to aid in the photorealism of his paintings. He eventually attempts to recreate a ...


2

I will start by a parallel with printing photos. Having a resolution of 300 ppi (pixels per inch) is relatively standard. It means that 300 pixels of a digital picture will be printed on one inch. It is common to assume that details are conserved with this resolution. So if the original painting is about 30*21 inch (like the Mona Lisa), you will need the ...


2

My two cents: You are new in photography and you are not very good in painting... Do not push yourself too much, but make a real effort to learn. 1) The photo. Here is a greeeeeeat photoshooot of a coca-cola pinup style session. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBUsA-AoRBg If your photo is good, the result is good... so you need to learn photography, ...


1

From the info you are providing there is no way to know. Some hints There is no way of knowing the resolution from the file size. Presumably both files have the same resolution (width x height), they are just delivered in different file formats. A high quality JPEG file has a very low information loss, (less than 0.4% compared to the uncompressed 24 bit ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible