50

It looks like you've got a problem with the shutter. Possibly one of the "blades" in the second curtain is missing and allowing light to strike the sensor between the time after the second curtain has completed its travel and the time the sensor is read out. Here's what a 70D shutter curtain looks like. Does the shape of the 2nd of four individual blade ...


31

The light you describe as "green" also contains components of "red" and "blue" light. They are much weaker than the green component, but they are there. Once the exposure is bright enough for the green channel to be fully saturated, increasing the exposure further can not increase the value recorded in the green channel to more than 100%. If green is fully ...


29

The easiest way to solve this problem is to use a neutral-density filter. They are essentially neutral grey filters that cut down on the light reaching the film or digital sensor. Good ones are fairly expensive, because they are surprisingly hard to manufacture. Another option is to shoot in more favourable conditions, like overcast days or really early ...


15

The Olympus OM-D EM-5 can display the cumulative collection of light in a long exposure. But there is another way to test long exposure that takes much less time and works with almost any digital camera. Start out by setting your camera to the highest ISO setting it has, open the aperture of your lens as wide as it will go and start with short exposures ...


13

In general, I would also recommend always shooting RAW, both to better capture the full dynamic range of your camera, and also to avoid the ugly digital clipping of overexposed areas. For the latter, it helps to underexpose your shots a little [...] and then pull the exposure up on your computer. OK, yeah, I was being a bit terse when I wrote that. Let me ...


11

You can close down the aperture and lower the ISO. This will help only up to a point. After that, what you need is a Neutral-Density (ND) filter. Those filters serve to reduce the amount of light reaching the sensor. They vary in strength. An ND4 for example, lets pass 1/4 of the light, so allows exposure 2 stops longer in shutter-speed. You can even get an ...


11

Some considerations: Turn your ISO right down to the minimum value Do you really need f/1.8? Depending on the composition of your shot you can usually still get decent shallow DoF up to around f/4.0 As people have already mentioned, use an ND filter. You can get variable ND filters fairly cheap online but be wary if you're using them at high settings or ...


10

Yes, you can use ISO 1600 in bright sunlight. But you will run into issues: You are getting the drawback of high ISO film (grain) without the benefit (high sensitivity). Depending on your camera you might run into shutter speed problems. Many film cameras are limited to 1/1000 sec or even 1/500 sec exposure time; this will not be enough. When you are unable ...


9

This is known as ETTR which stands for Expose To The Right. As you correctly described, this will improve image quality as long as there is no actual clipping. The name comes from the fact the the histogram will be skewed to the right without actually touching the right edge. There is one more reason why this is good which you did not mention. Sensors ...


9

We have no idea of the brightness of the scene you are photographing. Are you on a Mediterranean beach? In a forest at night? Put the camera on automatic, take a photo, and see what iso, aperture and shutter speed the camera chooses. You should aim for the same exposure, but just adjust other exposure settings (including choice of ND filter) so that you can ...


8

You're never going to get it back to 'good' because your subjects are backlit and you have a massive flare into the lens from the sun itself, right in-frame, which is causing the haze. You could pull some detail into it, but at quite a cost to noise levels & colour tones. This is a quick & dirty attempt just using Photoshop's Camera RAW filter. ...


7

If you are using an automatic exposure mode (e.g. Program mode, Aperture or Shutter-priority) then dialing in +/- exposure compensation tells the metering system to adjust the exposure up or down. Otherwise it will always attempt to produce the same exposure for the same scene. If you are in Manual mode, then you accomplish the same thing by simply ...


7

Automatic Exposure is never perfect, even if such thing exists. What cameras do it attempt to keep most tonalities within the dynamic range of the camera. It does so by measuring the scene in different spots, between 1 and 91,000 depending on the camera and metering mode and then computing exposure from there. If you see over-exposure, meaning the image is ...


7

Without knowing what strength of ND filter you were using, or under what lighting conditions, I can't give a specific answer. However, a little bit of back-of-the-envelope math can help give you an idea of the magnitude of the problem. Assuming you were shooting a brightly-lit scene under bright midday sun, without any ND filters, the Sunny 16 rule states ...


7

Why is it that when the green channel clips, it turns into blue? Actually, it turns towards magenta. Look more closely at your picture. When green clips and the other two channels (red, blue) don't, the result is basically lowering green. Lowering green has the same effect on hue as raising red and blue. Red+blue is magenta, so lowering green by itself ...


6

First - when you take a picture of a large dynamic range scene, not just portraits, and your camera cannot cover this dynamic range you'll either get overexposure of the bright parts or underexposed of the dark parts. There are some ways to workaround this: Shoot the portrait on a different background. Shoot HDR: I don't like this method for portraits, ...


6

You need more light on the background than on the subject. If all four of your lights are the same brightness, then you need to do two things: Insure that the lights illuminating the background are as close to the background as you can place them without being visible in the scene or creating uneven brightness on the background. Also insure that none of the ...


6

It is very likely that the aperture linkage is broken. The aperture is held closed by the spring until the objective is mounted, after that it is held opened by the camera so that the viewfinder is bright and is stopped down for each exposure. If the linkage is broken the viewfinder will be dark and the camera won't know about it and will overexpose as ...


6

You can do an approximate conversion by rounding 320 to 300. But also it's two and a half decades old. You mentioned adding a stop for every decade after the purchase date. Do you know the purchase date? If it expired in 1981, then it was probably not purchased (read: manufactured) in 1981. My suggestion would be to cut one sheet into test strips, and take ...


6

Normally, push processing is used with underexposed film. The typical effect can be seen in the film, Barry Lyndon, nearly all of which was push processed: Still image from Barry Lyndon Overdeveloping the film grows the grains bigger, so that it brings out details in underexposed areas, and reduces detail in normally exposed areas. If most of the ...


5

You are achieving somewhat long shutter speeds of 2 seconds. But the problem is the result of this is that the moving objects are not captured for long enough in the same position to get the desired effect. What might work best is to stack images. You could capture shorter frames of the cars moving, maybe 1/15th of a second for example, multiple times, then ...


5

Since the aperture directly affects image composition, it might not be desirable to stop your lens down when you hit the minimum possible shutter speed and ISO for your camera. The LO ISO option is pointless as well, since this is just an image pulled one stop in software to ISO 100 (in your case), which can be done (and probably better) in your ...


5

Here are a few methods I would use. I would certainly recommend doing it in Camera Raw, since you can fine tune a lot of adjustments at once. If you have truly blown out areas, they will not be recoverable, but the main thing you'll want to do is lower the overall exposure and probably bring up the black point so that you have good overall contrast (...


5

The approximate manual camera setting is likely achieved using the tried and true “sunny 16 rule”. Shutter speed is 1/ISO with the aperture set to f/16. Since you have chosen ISO 100, the exposure, according to this rule of thumb is 1/100 (likely you don’t have the 1/100 so we set the shutter @ 1/125 of a second @ f/16. You have chosen to set the aperture at ...


5

The short answer is that your ND filter is not strong enough. As Alan Marcus's answer points out, according to the Sunny 16 rule, in bright daylight at ƒ/16, you will get a nominally-correct exposure when your shutter speed is the inverse of your ISO (i.e., at ISO 100, you should set the shutter to 1/100 s). Setting the aperture at ƒ/22 buys you an ...


5

An outdoor shot at 5s should be massively overexposed. Taking the "Sunny 16" rule - at f/16 on a sunny day, your exposure should be 1 / (ISO) seconds - assuming you're at ISO 100, your correct exposure at f/16 will be 1/100s, or if your lens can stop down to f/22, 1/50s. However, you're approximately 8 stops over that (5 / (1/50) = 250, log2 250 ~ 8), so ...


5

assume I shoot in RAW on a sunny day. Sunny16 says I can use f/16, 1/100sec, ISO 100 for an even exposure. This is the correct exposure in the sense that middle grey will be at a good level. That's how auto exposure works. I have a slightly different rule : expose for the most important elements of the scene without compromising shutter speed. Shutter ...


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