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4

I would suggest trying your SX740 again, but use a far more conservative zoom setting. It should reduce your minimum focus distance to a workable level. The long telephoto setting is for making distant objects as large as possible in the camera, but you really only need to work with things that are close to you. The macro mode and wide angle [ie, not zoomed ...


4

My condolences for how your photos came out. It is always disappointing to get film back and find it in such poor condition. You appear to have a camera issue with film advance, potential light leaks, and possibly an issue with subpar handling by the developer/printer which resulted in a failure align negatives correctly. If you look at the top photo, on ...


4

It means "2nd generation", or "2nd version". Cf. Canon's use of "Mk II" on camera bodies.


3

I'm interested in doing Street Photography... Which is the best option between the two lenses? Street photography is about location ("street"). People may use any lens they desire. What works best depends on the person. Between the two options you mention, I'd consider going with the 17/1.8 because I'd expect it to be reasonably versatile and 14-42/3.5-5....


3

I'm interested in doing Street Photography, so I'm looking for something portable and I wonder if there is any relevant difference in lightweight between the two lenses. This really is a matter of preference. On occasion, I go hiking with a Pentax 645N. Back in the day shooters used things like a Graflex. So, whether or not something is "portable" enough is ...


2

This looks like the film was exposed to light in an uncameralike manner. Either the camera is not light-tight anymore, or the film you used has been abused (unspooled and respooled anywhere outside a darkroom). Also, this is an automatic exposure camera with a selenium cell meter. Selenium meters are known to fail or become intermittent from old age (which ...


2

In part it will depend on the body on which you're intending to use it. I'd already read about the image stabilization question (Panasonic does it in the lens, Olympus in the body, so mixing can lead to no stabilization or the two systems "fighting" each other - though (on an Olympus) either or both could be switched off). Thanks to your question (and ...


2

I don't know anything about either lens. However, after searching The Google Machine, it seems many users have noted that the Panasonic is slightly softer in the corners. Otherwise, the differences are marginal. The price difference between used copies of the lenses is much narrower, so I'd consider looking for a lightly used copy of the Olympus lens.


2

I agree with TheLuckless - point and shoot cameras like yours have Macro settings and can actually get quite close to things. As you zoom in, the minimum focus distance increases. You'll have to experiment but there's probably a balance between zoom and MFD where you'll get the shot that you want. The other option is to crop. That P&S has ~20MP - far ...


2

Either of these cameras would make a good choice. Choosing between them probably depends more on your specific shooting preferences. I have the X100F and have been using it for over a year in street photography and I love it, but as with any camera it's not perfect. The X100F is the latest in the X100 series so it has been refined a lot and it is so good ...


1

That line (low resolution) looks like a scanning defect, where the linear array isn't properly zero'd out. It should be in the exact same pixel place (assuming the images aren't cropped) on every single image. If the tone of the line changes, or waves around, then it could be a light leak. However you'll need to look at the negatives to determine that. If ...


1

No, on this particular lens. The ring flash would use the filter thread which is positioned around the front lens. The ring flash would add weight on the tip of the lens. Since the lens is a small motorized zoom lens, I would not trust it to support a ring flash. The motor and zooming mechanism risks premature breakage, even if not activated during the use ...


1

Yes, there is a very valid reason. Mirrorless cameras typically have an electronic first shutter curtain and a choice between electronic and mechanical shutter for the second curtain. First, you should understand how a traditional mechanical shutter works. In the beginning, the sensor is covered by the first curtain. The first curtain starts to move down, ...


1

Is the -.- at the bottom supposed to be a lens aperture? In which case this would mean that there is no lens or the lens is not detected (bad contacts in the mount, or defective lens or lens not supported, or added with a mount converter). This could also be the reason for MF. There could be some setting to allow taking pictures despite this (legacy/full-...


1

Be aware that some sophisticated wide angle lenses (floating element primes, wide angle zooms) are extremely sensitive to flange distance mismatches, so be sure that any adapter you use is precise in that regard. A mismatch of fractions of a mm that would merely throw off infinity focus with a normal prime can wreck havoc on the corrections and thus the ...


1

As of January 2019, Olympus themselves now produce OEM flash gear with built-in radio triggering: FL-700WR speedlight FC-WR transmitter FR-WR receiver The system allows for TTL, HSS, 2nd curtain, and three groups. The receiver has a sync port for studio strobes as well as a hotshoe for speedlights, and adds a recycle beep. See: https://www.olympus-...


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