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The AI stands for Auto Indexing, which means there is a movable ring just outside the mount with a tab on it which allowed mechanical lenses to communicate to the body the maximum aperture of the lens. With some Nikon digital cameras, that ring is still there - to make it easier to use AI manual focus lenses. But the older pre-AI manual focus lenses aren't ...


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Nikon has always said non-AI lenses are incompatible with their digital cameras, due to risk of camera damage occurring if we try. I think there are cases that no damage occurs, but it seems foolish to simply walk into that known problem with an expensive camera. If that's your choice, so be it and good luck, but I'd certainly look for a later used lens. I ...


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Thanks for the comments and for redirecting me to eBay. I found those visually very similar lenses that fit the specifications: Avenir Lens Navitar lens Toyo lens It seems that the same lens has been sold by different companies, so my guess is that mine has been sold by a reseller that did not engrave a name on it. It seems it's not sold anymore by any of ...


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Hours, no, but several minutes, yes. Photographers would use "posing stands" to help people keep their position:


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The claim is 'half true'. Very early photographs did take hours of exposure, but by the time the first portraits were being taken, that was down to 15 minutes or so. A long time to be sitting still, of course, but the sitters were aided in the same way as for painted portraiture, they had head- & arm-rests to enable them to hold a pose for this amount of ...


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Robert Cornelius supposedly took the first portrait photograph in America, a self protrait. According to his Wikipedia article: "Cornelius's image—which required him to sit motionless for 10 to 15 minutes—is the oldest known intentional photographic portrait of a human made in America, preceded by at least some months by portraits taken by Hippolyte ...


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This fact is true. And the reason is the light sensitivity of "film". Think about ISO 3 (or probably even less). Also fact about aperture which these days was to so small, probably around f11 (because of the quality of the glass). And the light in studios was no so powerful as contemporary one.


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