23

Your friend is right that it is actually always a 24mm lens — that is a property of the optics and never changes. But, he's wrong in saying that the crop factor does not apply. That's a property of the sensor size of the camera. From a practical point of view, zoom — changing focal length — and cropping are interchangeable. So, using a camera with a smaller ...


22

Your lens is a Yashica ML 50mm f/1.9. The one pictured below is a more recent version of the same lens. The mount is the CONTAX/Yashica mount. Yashica revived the Contax name over a decade after production of any Contax rangefinder cameras and lenses in Germany had ended. Yashica chose to officially market the line as 'CONTAX' (always in all capital letters)...


19

You won't readily find a Canon EOS → Nikon F or Canon FD/FL → Nikon F adapter. There are reasons for this. A lens's ability to focus through the entire distance range to infinity relies heavily upon the distance it's held from the image plane. This is known as the register distance or flange focal distance, and it's specific to each mount system. ...


15

You have already chosen your answer but I'd thought I would elaborate a little. Focal Length: Yes, it stays the same! The age of the lens doesn't matter regarding focal length. As long as there is some way of fitting any lens onto a body (generally a bigger format lens on a smaller format body), whether by an adaptor or by physically changing the mount, ...


15

In Custom function menu: C.Fn-7 Release shutter without lense: on The shutter can release. It can shoot in either mode, including P, AV, TV, M. In TV mode, set ISO to auto. ISO becomes a variable according to time and aperture you set.


15

In general, lenses do not degrade in this way. However, some old lenses made up until the 1970s contain elements made of thorium oxide — a radioactive element which yellows as it ages. These were used because they have a different refractive index, with low dispersion — so, generally, better-quality lenses, just as fluorite crystal or other exotic elements ...


15

The aperture ring is engraved with f-numbers duplicated; the duplicates are color coded the same. The lines you are asking about are also paired, same color. The idea is to graphically display the zone of depth-of-field. As an example, you focus on an object at 10 meters (32 feet) as indicated by the thick center white line. Setting the aperture at f/8 (...


11

Just based on visual comparison, this lens appears to be a Helios 44M-4 58mm f/2-16. From the images you linked to, it appears that part of the lens is missing. In the 2nd image, around the lens barrel you can see what appears to be front element retaining clamps or springs. (Helios 44M-x Lenses, in order: 44M-4, 44M-5, 44M-6, 44M-7) How I found it: ...


10

Having recently gone through this exercise first-hand, I'll share my results. I bought a Helios 44-2 58mm F/2.0 (M42 mount) on eBay for very cheap. To use the lens with my Nikon D7000 body, I bought a Fotodiox Lens Mount Adapter which includes a removable infinity focus correction lens. Shooting with the infinity focus corrective lens, I was very ...


10

As stated here ( and guessed by Dreamager) it is aligned with the lens release button of older Pentax cameras. It's much easier to change the lens in the dark. ( I don't really understand the advantage of the newer orange dots. ) From K-1000 user's manual: In the dark, when red dots are difficult to see, align the white plastic bump on the lens barrel ...


10

Have a look at the Lensbaby Composer (update: discontinued): It has an unique feel to it, has been used very effectively by wedding and portrait professionals for a long time. Now replaced by the Lensbaby Composer 2, quite a bit more expensive. At ~$300 for the Canon EOS mount version, it isn't cheap for a lens that isn't really general purpose at all, but ...


10

That's the metering fork, that was used to send information about the aperture setting from the lens to the camera on older camera models. The camera would have a pin that fits in the fork, so that turning the aperture ring moves the pin. You can see some images of that at Useful Info: Nikon Lenses.


10

Sadly for Nikon users, the F mount has one of the longest registers ever. (Mechanically) adapting a lens designed for a certain system to one with a shorter register is easy: just manufacture an extension tube of the correct length. The ability of controlling the lens will be mostly lost but this is less of an issue with lenses with mechanical aperture ...


10

This is the first, "zebra" version, optically the same design as Pancolar 2.0/50. The aperture control switch ("tumbler") should have 2 positions, "A" is counter-clockwise when looking at the front element, "M" is clockwise when looking at the front element - not 3 positions. The rear part of the lens should have an actuator pin that, when pressed, makes the ...


9

Consider getting a lens reversal ring. Screw it on the filter end and then you can mount the lenses on your D7000 in reverse for some macro shots!


9

When you shoot with a manual lens, with no lens attached or a lens that can't communicate with the camera (tested on the 550D/X2i, I believe this applies to all Canon DSLRs) you have 2 options: Shoot in M mode - you need to set everything yourself but the exposure indicators works and is about as accurate as it is with a Canon lens. Shoot in Av mode - the ...


9

Focus confirmation does indeed work. I have a D7000 (which is ergonomically very similar to a D600 - think of a D600 as a D7000 with an upgraded sensor) and have been using a Nikon 80-200mm f/4.5 AI on it perfectly fine. I just rotate the focus dial until the green confirmation dot shows up on the screen. An important concept to realize about a camera's ...


9

This is a "process" lens used to make copies on high contrast film for reproduction in newspapers, magazines, and books. The lens mounted on a square wood board with hole for the lens. The lens mounted with wood screws. On some, the board was metal, usually aluminum. If an aluminum mount was used it was also called a lens board. The lens mounted to metal ...


9

The crank is for rotating the prisms in front of the lens. Prismatic lenses place prisms in the optical path of the lens. These provide a unique special effect. If you look at the front of the lens in the photo you can see several small prisms have been placed in front of the lens. The hand crank rotates them in much the same way that one would rotate a ...


8

If you are talking for AI-P lenses, then there is absolutely no risk (see the other's answers giving the compatibility link). But it looks you are talking more of a pre-AI lens (original F lenses) where the P was meaning "Penta" for 5 elements. In that case there are two answers: The lens is original: it can cause a problem with cameras who have the ...


8

Breaking down your question: Is it worth the effort? If you already own lenses and don't want to spend money on digital lenses, you could say it is worth it. If you don't want to fiddle with the manual focus, it's not worth it. If you have to use this in an environment where fast focusing is critical, then no, it's not worth it. This is a bit subjective. ...


8

Although jrista answers the question in a basic way, he does not explain WHY a lens may be optimised for colour. As far as I'm aware any given lens will produce an 'adequate' image on both colour and B&W film, as its the same focusing plane and film area, however chromatic aberration is far more prominent in colour (its very hard to spot in B&W, ...


7

I have a feeling that the "Color" portion of the name is simply marketing, as the lenses in question were released at a time when color film was not as common. If there were any technical differences, they would probably be focused on reducing chromatic aberration (CA). Reducing CA is done by modifying the lens design and/or materials so that different ...


7

Some film era lenses could produce this effect on digital cameras, it's called a "hot spot". The reason is that unlike film emulsion, which is matte, digital sensor is glossy (as it's composed of thousands of micro lenses) and it causes the light to bounce back to the rear lens element. If this element is flat or if it's curvature is not enough to ...


7

That letter is not a W, but rather an M for Manual. Normally I would expect an A (for Automatic) on the opposite side of the slider. It is used to (de)activate mechanical aperture linkage to the camera. In position M the aperture ring directly controls the opening of the aperture. In position A it only sets the aperture value, but the aperture stays open ...


7

X-Fujinon says it all - that's Fujica X-mount, the one Fuji used on their SLR cameras from the early 1980s, before current mirrorless X-mount. Fujica X-mount has focal flange depth of 43.5mm, so there is no way to effectively use this lens on Canon EF-mount body since EF-mount had bigger focal flange depth of 44mm - there is no way to achieve focus to ...


7

The 100-300mm f/4.5-5.6 USM is a better lens than the 75-300 III. It is sharper, has better build, and most importantly has very fast Ring Type USM Auto Focus. It also has a non-rotating front element which is great when using a polarizer. A +8 rating from a reputable store means you should feel safe buying it and could always return it if there is a ...


6

No. Do not buy an adapter. Any adapter for Minolta MD lenses to Nikon bodies will either sacrifice the ability to focus to infinity or require a (usually cheap, low quality single) lens element for infinity focus. This is a simple consequence of the Nikon lens mount sitting further away from the body than on the manual Minolta MD system. Short of ...


6

There are separate issues. "Create" a lens - let's interpret that to be a design act - designing the curve according to focal length, required dispersion, etc. Yes, that's doable. There's lens design software around that will take a set of optimization criteria and some constraints and spit out a set of curves and glass types. Rustle up specific software ...


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