22

You won't readily find a Canon EOS → Nikon F or Canon FD/FL → Nikon F adapter. There are reasons for this. A lens's ability to focus through the entire distance range to infinity relies heavily upon the distance it's held from the image plane. This is known as the register distance or flange focal distance, and it's specific to each mount system. ...


22

Your lens is a Yashica ML 50mm f/1.9. The one pictured below is a more recent version of the same lens. The mount is the CONTAX/Yashica mount. Yashica revived the Contax name over a decade after production of any Contax rangefinder cameras and lenses in Germany had ended. Yashica chose to officially market the line as 'CONTAX' (always in all capital letters)...


16

In Custom function menu: C.Fn-7 Release shutter without lense: on The shutter can release. It can shoot in either mode, including P, AV, TV, M. In TV mode, set ISO to auto. ISO becomes a variable according to time and aperture you set.


15

In general, lenses do not degrade in this way. However, some old lenses made up until the 1970s contain elements made of thorium oxide — a radioactive element which yellows as it ages. These were used because they have a different refractive index, with low dispersion — so, generally, better-quality lenses, just as fluorite crystal or other exotic elements ...


15

The aperture ring is engraved with f-numbers duplicated; the duplicates are color coded the same. The lines you are asking about are also paired, same color. The idea is to graphically display the zone of depth-of-field. As an example, you focus on an object at 10 meters (32 feet) as indicated by the thick center white line. Setting the aperture at f/8 (...


12

Just based on visual comparison, this lens appears to be a Helios 44M-4 58mm f/2-16. From the images you linked to, it appears that part of the lens is missing. In the 2nd image, around the lens barrel you can see what appears to be front element retaining clamps or springs. (Helios 44M-x Lenses, in order: 44M-4, 44M-5, 44M-6, 44M-7) How I found it: ...


10

That's the metering fork, that was used to send information about the aperture setting from the lens to the camera on older camera models. The camera would have a pin that fits in the fork, so that turning the aperture ring moves the pin. You can see some images of that at Useful Info: Nikon Lenses.


10

Sadly for Nikon users, the F mount has one of the longest registers ever. (Mechanically) adapting a lens designed for a certain system to one with a shorter register is easy: just manufacture an extension tube of the correct length. The ability of controlling the lens will be mostly lost but this is less of an issue with lenses with mechanical aperture ...


10

Having recently gone through this exercise first-hand, I'll share my results. I bought a Helios 44-2 58mm F/2.0 (M42 mount) on eBay for very cheap. To use the lens with my Nikon D7000 body, I bought a Fotodiox Lens Mount Adapter which includes a removable infinity focus correction lens. Shooting with the infinity focus corrective lens, I was very ...


10

This is the first, "zebra" version, optically the same design as Pancolar 2.0/50. The aperture control switch ("tumbler") should have 2 positions, "A" is counter-clockwise when looking at the front element, "M" is clockwise when looking at the front element - not 3 positions. The rear part of the lens should have an actuator pin that, when pressed, makes the ...


9

Focus confirmation does indeed work. I have a D7000 (which is ergonomically very similar to a D600 - think of a D600 as a D7000 with an upgraded sensor) and have been using a Nikon 80-200mm f/4.5 AI on it perfectly fine. I just rotate the focus dial until the green confirmation dot shows up on the screen. An important concept to realize about a camera's ...


9

This is a "process" lens used to make copies on high contrast film for reproduction in newspapers, magazines, and books. The lens mounted on a square wood board with hole for the lens. The lens mounted with wood screws. On some, the board was metal, usually aluminum. If an aluminum mount was used it was also called a lens board. The lens mounted to metal ...


9

The crank is for rotating the prisms in front of the lens. Prismatic lenses place prisms in the optical path of the lens. These provide a unique special effect. If you look at the front of the lens in the photo you can see several small prisms have been placed in front of the lens. The hand crank rotates them in much the same way that one would rotate a ...


8

If you are talking for AI-P lenses, then there is absolutely no risk (see the other's answers giving the compatibility link). But it looks you are talking more of a pre-AI lens (original F lenses) where the P was meaning "Penta" for 5 elements. In that case there are two answers: The lens is original: it can cause a problem with cameras who have the ...


7

Some film era lenses could produce this effect on digital cameras, it's called a "hot spot". The reason is that unlike film emulsion, which is matte, digital sensor is glossy (as it's composed of thousands of micro lenses) and it causes the light to bounce back to the rear lens element. If this element is flat or if it's curvature is not enough to ...


7

That letter is not a W, but rather an M for Manual. Normally I would expect an A (for Automatic) on the opposite side of the slider. It is used to (de)activate mechanical aperture linkage to the camera. In position M the aperture ring directly controls the opening of the aperture. In position A it only sets the aperture value, but the aperture stays open ...


7

X-Fujinon says it all - that's Fujica X-mount, the one Fuji used on their SLR cameras from the early 1980s, before current mirrorless X-mount. Fujica X-mount has focal flange depth of 43.5mm, so there is no way to effectively use this lens on Canon EF-mount body since EF-mount had bigger focal flange depth of 44mm - there is no way to achieve focus to ...


7

The 100-300mm f/4.5-5.6 USM is a better lens than the 75-300 III. It is sharper, has better build, and most importantly has very fast Ring Type USM Auto Focus. It also has a non-rotating front element which is great when using a polarizer. A +8 rating from a reputable store means you should feel safe buying it and could always return it if there is a ...


7

During the 1970s and early 1990s, Vivitar serial numbers took the following form: MM Y WW SSS     MM = manufacturer code     Y = year; may be ambiguous, for instance 1979 and 1989     WW = week     SSS = item-specific serial number The manufacturer codes used by Vivitar are: 06 - Olympus 09 - Cosina Company, Ltd. 13 - Schneider Kreuznach 22 - Kino ...


7

This sign is used when you focus for infrared light (using IR film or filter). It can be in form of red dot or line. This is need because the IR light wave length is longer than visible light and you need to change the focal plane accordingly. Here is photo from Wikipedia where you can see why you need to change the focal plane:


6

That is for coupling the lens aperture mechanically to the old bodies, which had a pin which fit in that groove, so when you turned the lens aperture ring, the body knew what aperture was set. There is an image here showing the pin: http://www.aiconversions.com/images/VGANikkormatFT2w55Micro.JPG


6

Since you also mention video, I assume you want to mount them on a DSLR. It's not pointless (especially given the saving), but... the result might not be what you expect. This depends of course on the quality of the lens : an excellent one could still perform quite correctly. And maybe tack sharp is not what you need, depending on your artistic aims. I'll ...


6

A good web store like B&H has a list that seems to satisfy that criteria. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/Lens-Adapters/ci/3420/N/4077634486 There you can use filters like Brand (manufacturer) Camera fitting side (male side of adapter, camera mount) Lens fitting side (female, lens mount)


6

No. As far as exposure value goes, an f-stop is an f-stop. It's only where depth of field is concerned (and noise calculations derived from "total light captured", if you're the type who has to go there) that you need to think about equivalent f-stops. So if you are reading 1/250 at f/4, set your camera to 1/250 at f/4. That will give you a correctly-...


6

The AF confirmation actually works on a very similar principle to the old focus screen, in that they compare two different optical paths in order to determine exactly how in or out of focus the image is. The exact technique is different, but they accomplish the same end goal. The only difference is a computer is comparing the sides of the circle for you. ...


6

Since Canon introduced the EOS system in 1987, all EOS EF mount lenses will work on all EOS EF (full frame, APS-H) or EF-S (APS-C) mount bodies. This means they will be functional in terms of automatic metering and auto focus. What field of view each lens will yield on a digital body depends on the size of that camera's sensor. For a closer look at that ...


6

Japan was not the only country making cameras and lenses in the 1970's and 1980's but they had a huge market share. (they still do) Before World War II most good cameras were made in Germany. Japanese companies started making copies of German cameras in the late 1930's and by the time the war ended, these Japanese cameras were very good quality. In the ...


6

How can I modify my NIkon D5500 so I can make a vintage lens auto focus? You can't. I learned that using a TC-16A AF Teleconverter 1.6X might help ... Whatever you learned is probably wrong. From my googling it looks as if the TC-16A was designed to turn AIS lenses into AF lenses (i.e., an interim step to add electronic communication and the physical ...


6

Does old mf lenses give better image quality compared to new kit lens? You'd have to test it, or find tests others have made with those specific lenses. "Old MF lens" spans a huge range of image quality; there is not a single answer for all of them. The test I like to use is to print an ISO 12233 still image test chart onto two pieces of letter-sized paper,...


6

I'm considering buying an old manual focus prime lens for my DSLR. Be aware that you ( at best ) will lose not only autofocus but also auto metering ( you'll have to set exposure manually ). Be careful as well as not all DSLRs can mount manual lenses properly. I've noticed that they're often listed very cheap if they're described as "slightly clouded&...


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