4

I bought one today, and I kid you not, it still had its pricetag. R149 - that is South African Rand. In those days the ZAR was trading at R1 to the USD.


4

The most common causes of internal haze in lenses can be divided into three main areas: Surface contaminants. Oil, grease, heavy dust, or even a thumbprint left by a careless technician. Fungus. This can usually be identified by the 'spiderweb' patterns. Balsam Separation. Pine balsam was once the primary material used to bond multiple lens elements ...


4

Looks like fungus to me. You can try to clean it off but it may well have affected the coating and/or etched the glass. It looks like it's in the dead center of the rear element so it may affect contrast and/or image sharpness, perhaps more noticeably at small apertures. Run a roll through it and take shots at various apertures and lighting situations. That'...


4

The essence of the trick is to stand in exactly the same place. This may require some trial & error. Perspective will be your single biggest issue. You can only match perspective by observing from the exact same point. If from that point you cannot encompass the field of view of the original, then you need to either crop to your new border, or use a ...


3

I've got some experience with "found film" -- it's a lot of fun. First, don't expect much; film that stood in the camera, potentially for decades, is likely to be heavily fogged and show mottling and/or wrapper offset (where the ink on the backing has fogged the emulsion in contact with it on the supply and takeup spools). Second, you'll likely ...


2

On internal elements: Vaporized and condensed lubricants from aperture mechanisms, leaf shutters and other lens mechanics. Sometimes, other liquids that got inside and got trapped/washed stuff onto glass surfaces/left a residue (eg fleamarket lenses that got wet or suffered condensing moisture). On external surfaces: Urban air pollution, tobacco or other ...


2

Shooting tethered with a representation of the original image as an overlay is an option for any camera that allows tethered capture with live view.


2

This solution has two aspects to it: Taking the photograph from the exact same location, perspective, angle. Overlaying the photograph in post on the reference image. Taking the photograph Using an overlay will help you find the right camera position and focal length to match the reference image. You don't mention which camera you will use for the photo, ...


2

A very late update: 127 film is now available, new, in both color and black and white, from Rera (Rerapan, ISO 100 B&W, and Rerachrome, ISO 100 color negative despite the name); it's available from B&H Photo and Film Photography Project. Frugal Photographer also offers at least two color print emulsions in 127 (this is the Canadian-packaged Bluefire ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible