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The Nikon D5100 doesn't have high-speed sync (HSS) capability (apparently Nikon is known to reserve this feature to higher end cameras, as opposed to other manufacturers), so this option is useless in the X2T when used with this camera. Concerning the X2T delay option, as mentioned in the manual this setting [sets] the firing delay in high-speed sync ...


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Many "generic" flash makers have units that are supposed to be compatible with the Canon RT radio system. Most of them include "RT" in the model number of the units they offer that they claim are compatible. Most of them are, for the most part, compatible with OEM Canon RT devices. Where it gets a little bit messy is when one tries to get two different ...


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I am considering buying the Panasonic Lumix GX85 and would like to know if I can use my Yongnuo YN968 EX-RT flash with it. You might be able to use it as a manual-only flash. Are they compatible? Well, both are ISO-compliant, so you can put the flash on the hotshoe of the camera and fire it in sync. And the sync voltage is low enough that your camera ...


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It's a perfectly viable plan to use a TT350-N (or li-on V350-N) as your iTTL transmitter, but it's not just smaller and less powerful than a V860II-N, it also lacks CLS/AWL capability, it only swivels 270º not 360º, it has no sync port, no external battery port, no recycle beep, and it is not designed to do cross-brand TTL as a radio slave like the full-...


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Using the Godox TT350N as a means to control your other Godox speedlight is a perfectly viable option. If you later decide to buy a dedicated trigger, you can control both of them. The only drawback is that the controls on the flashes themselves are not as straight forward as they are on the Godox X2 or Xpro. Plus you will probably never use the speedlight ...


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As noted in another answer, High Speed Sync has limitations on available power, because of the way the flash has to be operated to light the full frame. There are a couple ways to get around this. Since you noted a dark band in the frame would be acceptable, because you really only need the window, one method would be to turn off the HSS. This will get ...


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Those are just flash basics. Flashes simply cannot put out full power in HSS mode, which HSS will then not likely be enough power this use for your real estate distances. So for your use in this case, use camera S mode (Tv in Canon) so you can set shutter speed to 1/200 second so that HSS flash mode will not be enabled automatically. Limiting shutter ...


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That's the nature of HSS. Instead of one full-power firing of the flash at a point when the entire sensor is exposed, it has to fire a series of very fast flashes at different points while different sections of the sensor are exposed between the slit caused by the first and second shutter blades. Otherwise, you'd get one band of well lit exposure through ...


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I just did the same, using my SB700 (and D850)with the Godox X pro N and the X 1 receivers. It worked great practicing in the house, either on Manual or TTL (on the flashes), but when I tried to set up a quick shot today, the flashes won't flash when on remote mode. I did not remember changing anything after intially finding that the set up was very simple ...


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You have to attach an X1R-C receiver to the foot of the 430EX II to use it in the Godox 2.4 GHz radio system. The X2T is a dedicated transmitter unit and cannot be used as a receiver. Ideally, I would recommend that you consider getting a Godox TT685-C or V860II-C speedlight instead to use as your off-camera speedlight. It's more expensive than the ...


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Yes, you need to attach a separate receiver to the foot of the 430EX II. The 430EX II has a built-in flash wireless slave system, but it will only operate with Canon's proprietary optical wireless system, and only when used with an compatible "Master" flash like a 580EX II, Canon ST-E2, or the built-in flash of some cameras like the T7i or 90D.


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