8

That's the nature of HSS. Instead of one full-power firing of the flash at a point when the entire sensor is exposed, it has to fire a series of very fast flashes at different points while different sections of the sensor are exposed between the slit caused by the first and second shutter blades. Otherwise, you'd get one band of well lit exposure through ...


7

Just to get the full understanding: Only to freeze fast moving subjects which need shorter shutter speeds than the flash's burning speed HSS is really required? Sort of. That is a common reason to use HSS, but there are also other use cases where HSS may be preferable to using ND filters. When you also want to use narrower apertures interspersed with wide ...


6

Yes, a so-called Strobist setup (a radio controlled off-camera hotshoe flash/speedlight) can be great for learning and experimenting with basic off-camera lighting, even while it won't deliver the same way a proper studio strobe setup would. However, if you can find a studio setup with two lights and two softboxes for less than a TT350+X1T, the chances are ...


5

Using the Godox TT350N as a means to control your other Godox speedlight is a perfectly viable option. If you later decide to buy a dedicated trigger, you can control both of them. The only drawback is that the controls on the flashes themselves are not as straight forward as they are on the Godox X2 or Xpro. Plus you will probably never use the speedlight ...


4

I have currently a Nikon D850 along with a SB-700 flash, whose main purpose is to shoot cosplays in events. I'm happy that using it on the hotshoe would get better photos than without it, but still I'm not satisfied. So I'd like to experiment to having it off-camera. Now, I've read [various] ways to trigger the flash off-camera, and I still am ...


3

As noted in another answer, High Speed Sync has limitations on available power, because of the way the flash has to be operated to light the full frame. There are a couple ways to get around this. Since you noted a dark band in the frame would be acceptable, because you really only need the window, one method would be to turn off the HSS. This will get ...


3

Is this Yongnuo specific model able to be fired in slave mode by another flash? Yes. The Yongnuo YN565EX III has S1 and S2 slave modes that allow another flash to send the "fire" command to the YN565EX III. In S1 mode the YN565EX III will fire when it detects a bright flash of light. In S2 mode the YN565EX III will ignore the first set of short bursts, ...


2

I am considering buying the Panasonic Lumix GX85 and would like to know if I can use my Yongnuo YN968 EX-RT flash with it. You might be able to use it as a manual-only flash. Are they compatible? Well, both are ISO-compliant, so you can put the flash on the hotshoe of the camera and fire it in sync. And the sync voltage is low enough that your camera ...


2

Profoto make a case with a shoulder strap for their A1 flash. I'm sure there are similar cheap knockoffs somewhere. Godox makes a similar type bag for their much larger AD600 Pro. Many lens cases come with shoulder straps, Some might be the right size for your flashes. I just use the cases that come with my Yongnuo and Canon speedlights. They have belt ...


2

You have to attach an X1R-C receiver to the foot of the 430EX II to use it in the Godox 2.4 GHz radio system. The X2T is a dedicated transmitter unit and cannot be used as a receiver. Ideally, I would recommend that you consider getting a Godox TT685-C or V860II-C speedlight instead to use as your off-camera speedlight. It's more expensive than the ...


2

Those are just flash basics. Flashes simply cannot put out full power in HSS mode, which HSS will then not likely be enough power this use for your real estate distances. So for your use in this case, use camera S mode (Tv in Canon) so you can set shutter speed to 1/200 second so that HSS flash mode will not be enabled automatically. Limiting shutter ...


2

Commander mode is for Nikon's optical CLS system or their radio WR system. It does not work with Godox's 2.4 GHz radio system. While the Godox TT685-N and V860 II-N full-sized speedlights can be optical CLS commanders/slaves, the TT350-N/V350-N cannot. Your TT350-N is set into radio master mode [antenna icon in lower left with M], to be used as a transmitter ...


2

It's a perfectly viable plan to use a TT350-N (or li-on V350-N) as your iTTL transmitter, but it's not just smaller and less powerful than a V860II-N, it also lacks CLS/AWL capability, it only swivels 270º not 360º, it has no sync port, no external battery port, no recycle beep, and it is not designed to do cross-brand TTL as a radio slave like the full-...


2

The first reason someone thinks they need a speedlight is typically a low light situation where you've hit the limits of iso/aperture/shutter speed. Either because your gear is hardware-limited, or because you may need to stop down and use a high shutter speed (e.g., macro shooting for DoF/camera shake). But the real reason you may want to consider getting ...


1

Check to see if the Wireless ID number on the transmitter is set to the same value as the Wireless ID number on the flash. If either of the Godex units is not capable of using Wireless ID numbers, then the ID number on the other unit must be set to "Off". From comments made by the OP of both this question and the one referenced below to an answer ...


1

Can someone help me find the right settings please? You don't need the right settings, you need the right trigger. Your flash is set to receive a radio signal from a radio transmitter. You need a Godox compatible 2.4GHz radio transmitter with a Nikon compatible hot foot mounted on your camera's hot shoe to trigger the flash in radio mode. You can use a ...


1

If you are using the built-in flash as your trigger, it has to fire. That's how optical triggering works. You can use a different trigger (radio, cable), or you can use a hard IR-pass filter like Nikon's SG-3IR to prevent the visible triggering flash from affecting your exposure. Going with a radio trigger, preferably one that works directly with your flash, ...


1

I solve the problem. My 622 tx had the latest firmware update, I just updated with the same version :)


1

No. Those cameras, along with a few other recent low end offerings from Canon, do not have an ISO compliant hot shoe with a trigger pin in the center to tell a non-TTL flash to "fire." The YN560-TX is not capable of receiving a "fire" signal from a camera that does not have a center pin. The only workaround for using manual flash with these cameras missing ...


1

The Nikon D5100 doesn't have high-speed sync (HSS) capability (apparently Nikon is known to reserve this feature to higher end cameras, as opposed to other manufacturers), so this option is useless in the X2T when used with this camera. Concerning the X2T delay option, as mentioned in the manual this setting [sets] the firing delay in high-speed sync ...


1

Many "generic" flash makers have units that are supposed to be compatible with the Canon RT radio system. Most of them include "RT" in the model number of the units they offer that they claim are compatible. Most of them are, for the most part, compatible with OEM Canon RT devices. Where it gets a little bit messy is when one tries to get two different ...


1

At a bare minimum, you need to make sure that: Your transmitter matches your camera. If you have a Canon camera, you need the Canon version of the X2T (the X2T-C). The Nikon (X2T-N) or Sony (X2T-S) version will not work on a Canon camera, and vice versa. The 'Channel' selected on the transmitter and the channel selected on the flash's radio receiver are the ...


1

I'm going to propose an alternate solution: consider switching to the Godox flash system, which uses big lithium rechargeable batteries. The battery is proprietary, so that's not so handy, but they're also not that expensive and easily available from major retailers. These will generally give you more shots than a set of Eneloop batteries in a flash, but ...


1

Yes, you need to attach a separate receiver to the foot of the 430EX II. The 430EX II has a built-in flash wireless slave system, but it will only operate with Canon's proprietary optical wireless system, and only when used with an compatible "Master" flash like a 580EX II, Canon ST-E2, or the built-in flash of some cameras like the T7i or 90D.


1

I just did the same, using my SB700 (and D850)with the Godox X pro N and the X 1 receivers. It worked great practicing in the house, either on Manual or TTL (on the flashes), but when I tried to set up a quick shot today, the flashes won't flash when on remote mode. I did not remember changing anything after intially finding that the set up was very simple ...


1

I've never tried this, but I think the Frio Cold Shoe Adapter would do the trick. See Is there a simple flash bracket which holds a flash securely? — 8ts a plastic shoe which snaps securely to the flash"s foot. There's space near the front which you could fit a thin strap though, or you could get a threaded pin to attach to a wider strap.


1

I did not find a definitive answer, so i did what every reasonable person would do and just bought a used nikon and a canon version to test it :). As slaves they both accept nikon and canon master TTL flashes, if set correctly. Like Michael C pointed out, nikon flashes have a golden font on them, and canon is in silver. Here I switched roles and accept ...


1

While the D3200 and your Neewer-branded* Voking VK750 II can both communicate iTTL signals, the Neewer-branded Godox FC16 Rx/Tx triggers cannot. If you look at the pin on the foot of the transmitter, and the hotshoe on top of the receiver, you'll notice there's only a single pin/contact. This is the way the sync (fire) signal is communicated. All the ...


1

The simplest and cheapest way to accomplish off-camera light with remote shutter release using Godox is to get a Flashpoint SPT (single-pin transceiver). Sadly, this is only a good solution if you live in the USA, because the transceiver is an Adorama Flashpoint exclusive. It's basically a Godox analog to the Yongnuo RF-605. The SPT transceiver can do ...


1

Choose an option: "The ground" was not ground, was a metal plate, because you were in an industrial environment, and several pins were in contact at the same time. Probably. "The ground" had a material that is not a conductor, like wood, or granite. It had no effect. I was not gentle and smashed the pins against the ground. Was not the ground. You were ...


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