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76

The peak power at work when a flash is being discharged is extreme. Example: a classic Metz 45CT (a large but still handheld unit) on full manual power delivers around 90 watt-seconds of electrical output to the flash tube in 1/300s. That means there are 27000 watts at work for a short time. A 27000 watt lightbulb (BTW, your flash is much brighter than ...


16

The reason you were triggering the other flashes is that the other photographer is a rookie. She was probably using the flashes as optical slaves... bad decision. Even if she was using a radio signal she could easily set up a different radio frequency. It is a rookie mistake leaving the flashes as the frequency 1. Because most likely other nonprofessional ...


12

So, what you have here is a mixed lighting situation. The background and star notes are being lit via flash (check out their shadows. Nice and soft and from top to bottom. The main bulb cluster is on the left and yet it has no impact on those shadows) and the bulbs themselves are being lit...by themselves :-). (There's probably a speedlight with a soft box ...


7

Yes, there are several systems that work in the way you describe, where the off-camera lights can switch between different TTL systems, and the only thing you need is an on-camera transmitter unit that matches the camera system (i.e., "speaks" the correct electronic flash protocol, and has a physical foot pin configuration that matches the contact ...


6

Although freshly charged NiMH measure at 1.4 or so volts, they quickly drop to 1.2 under load. However, unlike alkalines, they stay around that 1.2 for a long time (this is called a "relatively flat discharge curve"). Alkalines by contrast have a much steeper discharge curve but do present a higher terminal voltage when new. (Hint: You can separate unused ...


6

Yes, a so-called Strobist setup (a radio controlled off-camera hotshoe flash/speedlight) can be great for learning and experimenting with basic off-camera lighting, even while it won't deliver the same way a proper studio strobe setup would. However, if you can find a studio setup with two lights and two softboxes for less than a TT350+X1T, the chances are ...


6

Just to get the full understanding: Only to freeze fast moving subjects which need shorter shutter speeds than the flash's burning speed HSS is really required? Sort of. That is a common reason to use HSS, but there are also other use cases where HSS may be preferable to using ND filters. When you also want to use narrower apertures interspersed with wide ...


4

There may be others, but at least the Godox X (Flashpoint R2) system functions in this way. You have to have the correct trigger for your camera (e.g. the XPro-N for Nikon or XPro-C for Canon), but you will get TTL regardless of the strobes (though some need a firmware update for this to work). I regularly share a pair of AD200s with my Nikon and a Canon ...


3

We don’t know exactly what 1/3 C means but we can surmise it a typo and should read 1/3 of a second. Assuming this is true, how come the second shot, using a shutter speed of 3 seconds, is not overexposed? This might be a mistake, however, the text of the example you cited reveals the author used an electronic flash as the main light source. In your mind,...


3

You can also switch to Godox's system. You would need the Xpro-C for control from the camera, X1R-C receivers for your flashes, and of course some extra lights. You can get cheap flash units from Godox or Yongnou to work with these receivers, or even add some reasonably cheap monolights to complete your setup (these monolights have a built in trigger ...


3

I use them all of the time in several different hot shoe mount flashes. The only difference I've noticed is that when I put in a set of fresh alkalines, the battery level indicator shows 'full'. When I put in a set of freshly charged NiMH batteries, the indicator does well to show three out of four bars. However, a set of fully charged NiMHs that show three ...


3

Here's a list of common things to check. Are you using the wrong slave mode? For your speedlight to be a radio slave, the antenna icon must be showing, and the backlight should be orange. Godox's TT685 and V860II speedlights for Canon, Nikon, and Sony have five different syncing modes that the horizontal lightning bolt button cycles you through: On-...


3

No, this setup won't work. You're close, but not quite right. The X1T is not a receiver (hence, the "T" suffix) or transceiver — it is a transmitter only. So one X1T cannot trigger another X1T. You still need all the pieces you mentioned, but you also need an X1R to trigger the camera shutter. With wireless remote shutter and flash, you have two events: ...


3

Is this Yongnuo specific model able to be fired in slave mode by another flash? Yes. The Yongnuo YN565EX III has S1 and S2 slave modes that allow another flash to send the "fire" command to the YN565EX III. In S1 mode the YN565EX III will fire when it detects a bright flash of light. In S2 mode the YN565EX III will ignore the first set of short bursts, ...


2

A 6VDC power supply would actually have to be quite massive (think laptop rather than phone power supply sized), big speedlites can draw several amperes when charging. There are a few older flashes that, as per the documentation, deprecate the use of rechargeables (eg the Metz 45CT); this should not be an issue with more modern ones. The most likely cause ...


2

If you literally want to see the AF-assist beam: Mount the 600 EX on your camera Mount the lens cap on the camera's lens, switch it to AF Half-press the shutter release. P. 20 in the flash's manual states about the AF-assist beam: When autofocus cannot achieve focus on the subject in low-light or when contrast is low, the built-in AF-assist beam ...


2

When looking for information about something, it always is a good idea to do a quick research in the manual. The 600EX-RT's manual shows on p. 6: So my guess is that you mean the external metering sensor and the optical transmission wireless sensor, which both sit just above the AF-assist beam emitter (that would be my third guess).


2

No, a TTL speedlight is not overkill for real estate lighting, and Scott Hargis primarily built up his real estate business using manual-only Nikon speedlights and triggered them with their "dumb" optical slave mode ("S"), not even using Nikon's CLS TTL-capable proprietary wireless system. He also often didn't use stands or modifiers, but simply placed the ...


2

The YN-560-TX, as a dedicated radio transmitter requires a radio receiver to trigger a remote flash. The SB-900 does not have one built-in, so you need to add one onto the foot of the flash. You can use the RF-602, RF-603, RF-603 II, or RF-605. But all you will be able to do is fire the flash remotely. The YN-560-TX and an RF-60x cannot communicate TTL, HSS ...


2

Profoto make a case with a shoulder strap for their A1 flash. I'm sure there are similar cheap knockoffs somewhere. Godox makes a similar type bag for their much larger AD600 Pro. Many lens cases come with shoulder straps, Some might be the right size for your flashes. I just use the cases that come with my Yongnuo and Canon speedlights. They have belt ...


1

If someone is already in the Canon RT system (or one of its clones), then Yongnuo triggers would be a good option. A YN-E3-RT II (or the older original version) will communicate directly with any Canon RT flash without a need for an additional receiver. Yongnuo triggers and Yongnuo flashes are two different animals in terms of reliability. I've never had ...


1

Some alternative options to consider: One: Potentially the most cost effective option to running a four group setup like this is: Don't. Use your current three groups, and a fixed level light on a dumb-trigger. Example: Group-1: key-light Group-2: fill-light Group-3: hair-light Fixed Light: background-lights Set up your background exposure to be ...


1

It works reasonably well -- much better inside because the light can bounce around to reach the flashes. Range really depends on whether flashes have line-of-sight to the ST-E2. I'd say 30-40 feet from memory. I have not used it much outside. Wireless is super convenient outside if you have it. In its absence, and over longer distances, I much prefer a long ...


1

Why don't you want to bounce the flash against the ceiling? Because the ceiling is dark, too high or there is no ceiling? In such a situation, I think MagBounce or an umbrella is your best option, although it's not an exact replica, as the light is not coming from above. I have considered purchasing such a MagBounce modifier. A flash stand that is as high ...


1

Which aspect are you trying to reproduce? The light from above? You can bounce light off anything, so any large white (or silver, or whatever color you prefer) thing can be held off camera and have the flash pointed at it. You can hold a large white card or similar reflector above the camera and use it to bounce the flash onto the scene. Probably awkward to ...


1

Those GN are basically the same. The MAX reach of the flash is the GN / aperture f-stop. Let's make the math easy, we'll use GN 44m with an aperture of f/2.0 (you have a little further going to f/1.8). The GN is not regulated. It can be at various ISO (It is usually a rating at ISO 100). It can be different at different lens focal lengths. Some flashes are ...


1

Edit: reading the complete article in detail over lunch rather than the section in question and skimming the rest, the main source is a speedlight, which I missed while searching for more uses of 'flash' from the start of the article. - See Hueco's for the more detailed answer of what's going on with the dual exposure. Possibly a typo in the article (...


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