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4

You misunderstand the purpose of dark-frame-subtraction. While it is a technique used to reduce noise, it only reduces noise that is consistently output from the sensor. Any read noise due to the circuitry or uneven output such as hot-pixels. It does not reduce random noise. When you used dark-frame-subtraction on an image with noise that is primarily random,...


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A while back I tried some of these images and found that it was much more convenient to take a dark frame for a group of long exposures rather than sit and wait for a minute every time I took a minute long exposure (makes star trails look like morse code). At the time I was using RawTherapee which had a darkframe substraction module which worked really well, ...


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Try turning on in-camera darkframe subtraction instead. The designers of the camera have insight into how to best mitigate noise because they have detailed knowledge of the sensor and the noise inherent in the system. The in-camera noise reduction is part of the overall-engineering design specific to the camera. It is the product of informed expert ...


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Instead of reducing noise, the darkframe subtraction increased the noise- or rather, added some dark/monochrome noise. How long was your session? What was the ambient temperature? Was the camera at ambient temperature at the beginning of the session? At what point in the session did you take dark frames? If the camera was at ambient temperature when you ...


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