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The technique used by Cortex Camera is called Median Blending. Astrophotographers have been using this concept for years to combine multiple photos of dim objects in the night sky to reduce the noise and increase contrast and color. It is often referred to as image stacking in which hundreds of images of the same piece of sky are overlaid and the values for ...


8

These days, I would think pros use tools like Adobe Lightroom as much as Photoshop. Lightroom 3.x specifically is particularly well suited to removing noise as it uses a newer, more advanced algorithm to do so. It may also be the case that the latest version of ACR (Adobe Camera RAW) for photoshop has the same noise reduction tools if you happen to be using ...


5

This is well beyond my understanding of the technology but I have read an article on this here. http://www.csie.ntu.edu.tw/~fuh/personal/NoiseReductioninRawDataDomain.A2-2-0103.pdf It was an interesting read on the subject. Also I notice you are using GIMP and CS5 for noise reduction, I found both to give me sub par results. I ended up settling on Nik ...


5

There is a way to do this in Photoshop (I'm using CS5 Extended) Shoot multiple exposures. In Photoshop, go to File > Scripts > Load Files into Stack. Click Browse and select the exposures to be used in the Stack and check Attempt to Automatically Align Source Images and Create Smart Object after Loading Layers. This will create a single Smart Object from ...


4

It sounds like you want to use an alternate noise reduction algorithm integrated into Lightroom's RAW conversion, as an alternate for or addition to the built-in noise reduction. I don't think there are any plugins that work that way. Everything I can find uses Lightroom's external editing functionality — which sends a processed TIFF or JPEG to the other ...


3

Many of darktable's algorithms are significantly different from those typically used by other image processing programs. If you cannot get the results you want from darktable, consider trying other raw processing software, such as RawTherapee or UFRaw. The images are consistent with the use of noise reduction filters with different "strengths", where the ...


2

scottbb has more than adequately covered the pure photography side of things, so I'd like to add another aspect. Bouncing a camera repeatedly over a bumpy field on a hard mount & expecting it to last more than a week is going to be an expensive learning curve. I'd see the three main points of potential failure to be - The lens elements being shaken out ...


2

While the actual questions you asked aren't very broad in scope ("should I use Av/Tv/Manual mode?", and "Is the 18-55 STM lens useful for my application?"), I think the details of your use-case open this up to a HUGE range of considerations. Should I use Av mode, Tv mode or manual mode? You should use manual mode, with automatic ISO. Your primary goal is ...


2

As you mention there are several denoise plugins in Darktable, they differs in the algorithm how they will fight noise, speed, artifacts produced, resource usage etc. denoise (non-local means) - works on luma (lightness noise) and chroma (color noise) denoise (bilateral filter) - works on each channel (R,G,B noise) equalizer (exotic wavelets) - i suppose ...


2

My guess is you're using denoise (profiled). If so, then you should read darktable's manual section on profiled denoise, where it is clearly stated that you should use a blend mode to avoid that effect you've shown in your examples that look smeared and painterly. To summarize: Use non-local means for luma noise, combined with blend mode ligthness or HSV ...


2

Denoising is a vast subject, there are a lot of methods and a lot of research papers about it in the literature. A simple and efficient algorithm that you can take a look at is called Non Local Means. Basically it aims at averaging pixels that look similar as there are a lot of redundancy in an image. You can do it on the bayer (by taking into account the ...


2

Which is the main subject in these cases? Which did you, the photographer, mean to be the main subject? You need to decide what you're trying to say with your photo and ensure that the photo communicates that. If that means stopping down so that you have a greater depth of field, that's what you need to do. (I appreciate that with a D5600 and the kit lens, ...


1

I agree with Philip Kendall. That said, the OP asked about setting focus for multiple subjects, i.e., a basic question about controlling DOF. Depth of field (DOF) is the range of distance from the camera that is in focus. It can be shallow or deep. You control it by adjusting your aperture: a small aperture (like f14) gives greater depth of field than a ...


1

The classical solution for edge-preserving noise reduction is to apply a bilateral filter: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bilateral_filter . This calculates the average of a group of pixels in the immediate environment, but it ignores the pixels whose difference is too large, like on the other side of an edge. Thus it filters away the differences that are ...


1

The blur is due to heat haze. I have had this exact same issue happen when taking pictures of birds on lakes. Just this winter I had the same issue when taking photos of snow geese. The only way I've found to "fix" the blur was to either close my distance between the subject and myself, wait for the haze to dissipate or increase my elevation so I wasn't ...


1

DxO 9 has a new PRIME algorithm that is marketed as being a very much improved noise reduction algorithm for high ISO images. Here is a link to start you off on the PRIME algorithm. PRIME by DxO I have used it myself and I am happy and quite impressed by the result. But it is very processor intensive and takes a long time to process each image.


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Here's a link to the User Manual for version 3.12 of Canon's Digital Photo Professional. http://gdlp01.c-wss.com/gds/1/0300009841/01/dpp312-11w-en.pdf (I don't yet have enough reputation to add comments to someone else' answer.)


1

Yes, you will get noisier images at higher ISO numbers, and the blue specs are also noise. The best ISO for an indoor shot depends pretty much on the available light and subject. For a still life, if you can use a tripod, you can use a lower ISO. But if your subject was a cat, you'd need a faster shutter speed and/or flash, hence reducing the light and ...


1

The blue specks are read noise that is being amplified when you try to pull details out of shadows that are pretty much pure black. Noise is a result of low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In the case of digital photography signal is determined by the amount of light allowed to hit the sensor. Noise is a combination of constant read noise caused by the ...


1

Here is my attempt : I've used G'MIC filters "Remove hotspots" and "Smooth [Bilateral]" to achieve the cleaning.


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There are some sophsticated filters that are implemented in software such as the G'MIC plugin of GIMP. You can try this online here. I've never used G'MIC for texture removal and I have not installed it on my present computer, so I'm not sure if it has a good filter that works well for this case. Now, if some standard method doesn't work well, you can ...


1

Yes. Averaging exposures is similar to what you'll see in movies. If you stop on one frame, the grain is visible and often dust spots and scratches. When you're viewing at 24FPS, those aren't as noticeable because the subject is constant, but the grain has a randomness to it.


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