Hot answers tagged

25

First: please recognize that despite what you may read on click-hungry review sites or fan-fueled forums, every DSLR and mid-to-higher range mirrorless camera on the market will be stellar for the purposes described. Any differences are details — every option is an A and it's then down to arguing over A+ or A++, as well as subjective factors or very ...


16

You appear to be using your lens (100-400/5-6.3) with the aperture wide open. I would expect the glow in your photos to be significantly reduced or absent stopped down to about F8. Many lenses "glow" when used wide open, especially in bright light with high contrast. It is likely associated with spherical aberration and is typically reduced or completely ...


11

The fact you're seeing this with two very different bodies suggests to me it's in the lens. Long zooms tend to have a bunch of elements (anywhere from a dozen to twenty, in my experience). No lens coating is perfect, and no lens surface is perfect. Every time light passes through an air-glass or glass-glass interface at an element surface, there's a small ...


10

There is no problem with this photograph, there is a 'problem' with the scene. There is a lot of dust in the air. The dust in the air scatters light around, therefore you 'lose' light from the mountains, and mountains get darker as they are further away. And light coming from other directions is added to the light coming from the mountains, which makes them ...


8

Most cameras have color profile settings that can be changed. On Nikon cameras, they are called Picture Controls. See pages 155-163 of the D5600 User Manual for details. Presets include: Standard, Neutral, Vivid, Monochrome, Portrait, Landscape, and Flat. You can further customize: Sharpening, Clarity, Contrast, Brightness, Saturation, and Hue. As for the ...


8

As others have pointed out, a large part of the difference between the two is the air quality at the time the image was captured. One was taken in what appears to be fairly clear, dry air. The other was taken through air that was very hazy due to either dust, moisture, or both. Beyond that, there are a few other noticeable differences: The first image is ...


7

Are the frame numbers visible? If they are, processing chemicals and times are fine, but the film was not exposed. If the frame numbers are not visible, whether or not the film was exposed, the processing is at fault - exhausted chemicals or maybe incorrect sequence.


6

Matt is correct. Pretty much everything on the market these days is very good and will outperform a D90 in almost all respects. He's also correct that raw files are intended to allow the photographer (or editor, if a different person) latitude in processing the raw data to create an image. This comes with the price of spending some time post processing, or ...


6

The primary problem here is simply one of exposure. The camera's metering system is not really smart — it doesn't know the difference between a white blanket that's dimly lit and a gray blanket that's brightly lit. It just assumes that everything is somewhere in the middle. Your scene contains a lot of white. This fools the camera's assumption about the ...


6

White-Balance correction works best with a bright grey. Most grey surfaces work but precision is lower when the surface is darker. Correction will not work if any of the channels are clipped which is why too bright is a problem. The reason extreme brightness is problematic is that the camera is unable to figure out what transformation to apply if the ...


5

Turns out you have to set the cameras time zone and time.


5

Focal length does not much depend on the bird or the camera, but instead depends on the distance to the bird. Is distance 3 meters or 30 meters? The camera you own is likely very fine. Use it to learn if your use actually needs any other feature.


5

Your issue probably has nothing to do with focus or how sharp your lens is at various focal length/aperture combinations. You're using a 1/160 exposure time with 300mm focal length on an APS-C size sensor. Camera movement is almost certainly what is causing most of the blur you see. If you use the same ISO and open up the aperture three stops to f/5, your ...


5

That is the EE servo coupling switch. This is only for use with older lenses (non-G AF lenses). Modern AF-S G lenses don't have an aperture control ring (it's completely controlled by the camera body). When a non-G AF lens is mounted, the tab on the lens engages the switch on the camera when the lens's aperture ring is stopped down to is minimum aperture ...


5

There will be minimal difference; particularly for macro type photography where the aperture generally has to be stopped down in order to achieve a usable depth of field. The D610 has a pixel size of 5.95um and the D810 has a pixel size of 4.87um. In order to resolve all visible light wavelengths to that size requires a (theoretical) perfect lens used at f/...


5

What kind of lighting are you using? I think that is where a lot of potential for improvement lies. With textured subjects, the angle(s) of your light source(s) with regard to the camera's optical axis can make a significant difference in contrast and the amount of detail you can see. Using flash will also allow you to "kill the ambient" and freeze any ...


5

A camera is not a PC where you can swap standard components. Physically, the processor's tiny little contacts are soldered on a printed circuit, so you can't change just the processor, you would have to change the electronics, and it's unlikely that a circuit from a new camera fits in the old (size, but also fixation points). These new electronics would ...


5

This isn't possible with DSLRs using optical viewfinders. This image (source) shows the cross-section of a DSLR: Normally light enters the lens, reflects off the mirror (#2) into the pentaprism (#8) and then to the optical viewfinder (#9). When the mirror is in this position, light does not reach the sensor. When recording a video, the sensor makes 60 ...


4

The view finder of cameras doesn't always cover the whole picture (around 85% on entry-level cameras, 95% on yours) but I don't think this is the problem. You are likely too focused on the bird and see it/remember it bigger than it really is. Try shooting a distant and fixed object with a fixed camera (tripod, or set on a table). Aim at subject, make a ...


4

There are some differences due to the way each camera processed each image. Nikon's 'Standard' Picture Control is more neutral, while Canon's 'Standard' Picture Style is punched up with saturation, contrast, and sharpening. The closest Nikon equivalent of the Canon 'Standard' Picture Style is 'Vivid'. The Canon Picture Style closest to Nikon's 'Standard' is ...


4

If you have to invest, invest first on the lenses. For ambient light portraits, a good prime lens will work wonders. That being said... I will say something totally wrong :o) If a RAW file has dull colors is probably because it has a good dynamic range. If the colors are saturated and the whites and blacks are super contrasted, the dynamic range is most ...


4

Sounds like you have Red-eye reduction switched on. From the linked online manual… The characteristic of red-eye reduction is to pre-flash, one or more times, so your subject's pupils contract, preventing reflection of the flash from the rear of the eyeball.


4

The Nikon scanners do not require regular maintenance. They are however quite prone to dirt and dust. Your best bet keeping the scanner running problem free for a long time is to store it in a clean place (wrapped in a cover) when not in use. Some units are also starting to show signs of age and may e.g. have problems with the lubrication drying out. They ...


4

Assuming all other potential issues are eliminated (and it sounds like you've done a good job of making sure of that), I would check the following: Does the aperture close on its own smoothly? Almost all Nikon F-mount lenses (including this one) have a mechanical linkage to the camera body. So you can easily check the aperture's action by taking the lens ...


4

f/2.6 is one-fourth stop less than f/2.8. Your Nikon D700 only displays apertures in one-third stop increments. The next widest f-number past f/2.8 it displays is f/2.5 Even when the lens is set to f/2.6, your camera has no way to display that number. Apparently it displays f/2.8 unless the lens can open up to f/2.5 or wider. If the lens is set to f/2.6 ...


4

What is that camera? The camera you've pictured appears to be a Nikon D750. How many cameras these days have it especially Nikon D5300? Well, pretty much all digital SLR cameras have full color screens so that they can display image previews. How much color they use in their menu and control screens is a bit more variable. This YouTube video about the ...


4

It certainly depends on whether or not your lens manufacturer supports this officially or has planned for people using it. Some mechanisms won’t be pushable, which means you might break them when attempting to do this. You could always send a mail to the specific lens manufacturer and ask them about it. I would not recommend doing it for any lens that’s ...


4

Your only hope is someone selling salvaged used parts (or salvaging them from another lens yourself). Other than a few external cosmetic parts, such as rubber grips and battery doors, Nikon does not sell parts to anyone - even camera repair shops with great reputations. At least not in the U.S. and Canada.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible