Hot answers tagged

25

First: please recognize that despite what you may read on click-hungry review sites or fan-fueled forums, every DSLR and mid-to-higher range mirrorless camera on the market will be stellar for the purposes described. Any differences are details — every option is an A and it's then down to arguing over A+ or A++, as well as subjective factors or very ...


18

The shutter speed now is 250 From what I can tell from the Google, the Nikon D3100 has a flash sync speed of 1/200. So, you're setting your shutter speed too fast and the curtain is already starting to close when the strobes pop. Your maximum should be 1/200. But, honestly, there's no reason to even flirt with the edge that much. You can go down to 1/125 ...


15

You appear to be using your lens (100-400/5-6.3) with the aperture wide open. I would expect the glow in your photos to be significantly reduced or absent stopped down to about F8. Many lenses "glow" when used wide open, especially in bright light with high contrast. It is likely associated with spherical aberration and is typically reduced or completely ...


14

The Nikon FG-20 has an electronic shutter, which will not work properly if no battery is inserted. You can, with limited capabilities, still use the camera without a battery. Light metereing will of course not work, but the shutter speeds are also restricted to B and a mechanically controlled 1/90s indicated as 'M90' on the speed dial. Unfortunately, the ...


11

In low-light settings the quality is just not good, blurry. I really just do travel photography so don't have time to mess with settings if I am capturing scenes of people out at night in a busy Chinese pedestrian street, for example. Then get a good phone that does computational photography very well. It will think for you more than and better than any ...


11

The fact you're seeing this with two very different bodies suggests to me it's in the lens. Long zooms tend to have a bunch of elements (anywhere from a dozen to twenty, in my experience). No lens coating is perfect, and no lens surface is perfect. Every time light passes through an air-glass or glass-glass interface at an element surface, there's a small ...


10

It depends on the specific camera. The Pentax K1000, for example, only requires the battery for metering, but everything else is mechanical. On your camera, shutter timing is electronic and requires a battery — but according to the manual there is a special setting M90 which provides a 1/90th of a second shutter speed which is all mechanical and can be used ...


9

In the spirit of "Teach a man to fish"... I almost don't know anything about lenses and cameras and photography, I just have D800E camera and I want to buy a lens that I can shoot photos of my family in travel. I'm genuinely curious how someone who doesn't know a thing about photography wound up with almost $2k sunk into their first camera. Photography ...


9

There is no problem with this photograph, there is a 'problem' with the scene. There is a lot of dust in the air. The dust in the air scatters light around, therefore you 'lose' light from the mountains, and mountains get darker as they are further away. And light coming from other directions is added to the light coming from the mountains, which makes them ...


8

Most cameras have color profile settings that can be changed. On Nikon cameras, they are called Picture Controls. See pages 155-163 of the D5600 User Manual for details. Presets include: Standard, Neutral, Vivid, Monochrome, Portrait, Landscape, and Flat. You can further customize: Sharpening, Clarity, Contrast, Brightness, Saturation, and Hue. As for the ...


8

As others have pointed out, a large part of the difference between the two is the air quality at the time the image was captured. One was taken in what appears to be fairly clear, dry air. The other was taken through air that was very hazy due to either dust, moisture, or both. Beyond that, there are a few other noticeable differences: The first image is ...


7

Your underlying problem seems to be how to take (better) photos quickly, not what camera you should get. While equipment can make more of a difference than some would like to believe, it seems you have not yet reached the limits of your current gear. Switching cameras may even slow you down. Recently, I met someone with a brand-new full-frame Nikon DSLR ...


7

Are the frame numbers visible? If they are, processing chemicals and times are fine, but the film was not exposed. If the frame numbers are not visible, whether or not the film was exposed, the processing is at fault - exhausted chemicals or maybe incorrect sequence.


6

From one of your comments: I only have the one lens that came with my Rebel T3 Assuming that's the 18-55 kit lens or something similar, this will be far more significant than the body or the brand you are using. If you changed to (say) the 17-55 f/2.8, you'd get two stops of improvement at 55mm. Change to the 50mm f/1.4 and you'd get another two stops ...


6

Although the transmissivity of the lenses might explain this difference, part of it could also be due to the possibility that the 16-80's electronic aperture mechanism might be miscalibrated. I do not know if this lens's aperture mechanism has a greater or lesser tendency to be miscalibrated, but I assume the possibility is not zero. I agree with you that ...


6

I understand your concern. I personally have bought things on Amazon which looked completely legit but turned out to be fraudulent. (Like, not just generic instead of official, but actually with fake brand silkscreening.) However, this is generally because Amazon isn't really selling most of the stuff on amazon.com — it's a big network of third-party ...


6

Matt is correct. Pretty much everything on the market these days is very good and will outperform a D90 in almost all respects. He's also correct that raw files are intended to allow the photographer (or editor, if a different person) latitude in processing the raw data to create an image. This comes with the price of spending some time post processing, or ...


6

The primary problem here is simply one of exposure. The camera's metering system is not really smart — it doesn't know the difference between a white blanket that's dimly lit and a gray blanket that's brightly lit. It just assumes that everything is somewhere in the middle. Your scene contains a lot of white. This fools the camera's assumption about the ...


5

Hasselblad (250mm) lens was made for 120 or 220 roll film... if I successfully mount it to a full frame 35mm camera, how long is the lens? 250mm. What it's effective focal length? 250mm. That's because "effective focal length" is based on the angle of view obtained by a particular focal length when used with 36 x 24 mm full frame (a/k/a "35mm" 135 ...


5

We depend on the accuracy of our camera settings in anticipation that a “correct” exposure will result. In modern times, built-in metering and chip logic all but guarantee a good outcome. I think this is remarkable because “correct” exposure is a path laden with pitfalls. We place dependence on the f-number markings and shutter speed settings along with ISO ...


5

(This answer is based on the assumption that you are not using different "protective" UV filters, ND filters, Polarizing filters, or any other type of filters on either lens. If you have different filters on each lens, it should be rather obvious where the differences are mostly coming from.) Why is a lens darker than other ones when applying the same ...


5

I'm going to provide a second answer to this question (there's nothing wrong in providing two answers). Somehow, the "landscape", "seascape", "cityscape" suggests me that you want to take wide-angle shots. So certainly you don't want the filter for 35mm f/1.8 lens. I would based on the "-scape" pictures suggest 72mm filter for the wide-angle zoom lens. As ...


5

This is a known issue with the Nikon 18-200 ƒ/3.5–5.6 VR lens. Some people have reported a simple workaround, some others report the workaround doesn't work. The Problem Apparently the VR mechanism inside the lens emits some infrared radiation, enough that it can be picked up in some cases, especially in long-exposure photography. Although, 30 seconds at ...


5

Your issue probably has nothing to do with focus or how sharp your lens is at various focal length/aperture combinations. You're using a 1/160 exposure time with 300mm focal length on an APS-C size sensor. Camera movement is almost certainly what is causing most of the blur you see. If you use the same ISO and open up the aperture three stops to f/5, your ...


5

That is the EE servo coupling switch. This is only for use with older lenses (non-G AF lenses). Modern AF-S G lenses don't have an aperture control ring (it's completely controlled by the camera body). When a non-G AF lens is mounted, the tab on the lens engages the switch on the camera when the lens's aperture ring is stopped down to is minimum aperture ...


5

There will be minimal difference; particularly for macro type photography where the aperture generally has to be stopped down in order to achieve a usable depth of field. The D610 has a pixel size of 5.95um and the D810 has a pixel size of 4.87um. In order to resolve all visible light wavelengths to that size requires a (theoretical) perfect lens used at f/...


5

What kind of lighting are you using? I think that is where a lot of potential for improvement lies. With textured subjects, the angle(s) of your light source(s) with regard to the camera's optical axis can make a significant difference in contrast and the amount of detail you can see. Using flash will also allow you to "kill the ambient" and freeze any ...


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